You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Lee, Arthur
  • Recipient

    • Franklin, Benjamin

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Lee, Arthur" AND Recipient="Franklin, Benjamin"
Results 1-50 of 88 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
AL : Historical Society of Pennsylvania Mr. Lee’s Compliments to Dr. Franklin. The Gentleman who deliverd him the inclosd Letter, having informd him, that the Bearer of it from Mr. Cushing was under an express injunction to deliver it to Dr. Lee in the absence of Dr. Franklin, as the Contents requird immediate attention; Mr. L. took the Liberty of opening it. The Contents however appear to Mr....
ALS : American Philosophical Society I write to you more to prove my remembrance of you, than for the importance of any thing I have to communicate. The two defeats near Boston seem to have made little impression on the Ministry. They still talk of great things to be expected from their Generals and Troops when united. One of your judgment will draw more information from the single word Rebels...
AL : National Archives; copies: National Archives; copy: University of Virginia Library This is the first time that we have printed a letter addressed to Franklin but not meant for him. Our reason is that he eventually received it, contrary to the writer’s intent. The whole episode remains to this day, thanks to the character of Arthur Lee, in Winston Churchill’s phrase “a riddle wrapped in a...
LS and two copies: National Archives; copy: South Carolina Historical Society We joined each other at this place on the 22d. of December and on the 28th. had an Audience of his Excellency the Count De Vergennes, one of his most Christian Majesty’s principal Secretarys of State and Minister for Foreign Affairs. We laid before him our Commission with the Articles of the proposed Treaty of...
LS and copy: National Archives; copy: Harvard University Library Since our last, a Copy of which is enclosed Mr. Hodge is arrived here from Martinique, and has brought safely the Papers he was charged with. He had a long Passage and was near being starved. We are about to employ him in a Service, pointed out by you, at Dunkirk or Flushing. He has delivered us three sets of the Papers we...
ALS and copy: National Archives Since Our last We have received the inclosed Intelligence from London, which we take the earliest Opportunity of forwarding, in hopes it may be received with Our other Letters by Nantes. A Vessel from So: Carolina, loaded by that state, which sailed the 20th December, is arrived at L’Orient with Rice and Indigo. As We were particular in Our last which was sent...
ALS : Connecticut Historical Society I arrivd here the night before last, and shall proceed tomorrow. Your Dispatches I receivd from Mr. Montandouine, and they will go on board this day with the others, as the Ship is to sail tomorrow. Mr. Williams has purchasd another Ship, I think the Ct. Vergennes, of three hundred tons, which he expects to dispatch in three weeks. The demand we made upon...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Since my last, I have been informd of an agreement made between Mr. Morris and the Farmers general, by which he stipulates to let them have all the Tobacco which shall arrive in France during the war, on the account of the Congress, at seventy Livres a hundred. The ratification of this bargain they knew on the 30th of last month, which I think was about the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I thank you for your Letter of the 12th. I wish the news may be true. I found a Letter here from London of the 2d. which says, that Ships are actually sent for the ten thousand Germans, which with three thousand british they expect to have very early in America. That they hope for great advantages from dissentions in Pensylvania. That Burgoyne’s destination...
ALS : Connecticut Historical Society I arrivd here this day and shall pursue my journey to-morrow, and as the march is as regular as the Sun, it is agreed that the Voiturier shall place me in Madrid, in 13 days. By Mr. Delap’s account the Imports from America, I mean from the United States, amounted last year to fifty five thousand pounds Sterling. He expects soon to have an exact list of the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Morristown National Historical Park I am thus far safe on my journey, which by the spur of six pistoles more I am to finish two days sooner than was at first agreed. Therefore if no accident happens, I shall reach my destination on the 6th. of next month. In the Committee’s Letter of the 23d Ocr. to me, it is said we are to negotiate with other...
ALS and copy: National Archives We send you herewith the Draught of a Frigate, by a very ingenious Officer in this service, which appears to Us peculiarly suitable for Our purpose, and We are in hopes of being able to ship Cordage and Sail Cloth, and Anchors &c. sufficient for Five or Six such Frigates, by the Time you can have them built. Though deprived of any intelligence from you since the...
AL : American Philosophical Society I have been desird to stop here which is half way to Madrid, in order to negotiate with more secrecy. There appears more timidity here than with you. What I shall be able to do, I cannot yet determine, but I am told that if I proceed to Madrid it will be likely to prevent the execution of those good intentions there may be towards us. I beg you will write me...
LS : National Archives; L : British Library; copy: National Archives It is now more than 4 Months since Mr. Franklin’s Departure from Philadelphia, and not a Line from thence written since that time has hitherto reached either of your Commissioners in Europe. We have had no Information of what passes in America but thro’ England, and the Advices are for the most part such only as the Ministry...
ALS : American Philosophical Society In my return to this place, I receivd the joyful intelligence which I enclose; and in which I congratulat you a thousand and a thousand times. The Congress had removd to Baltimore, and General Putnam was providing for the defence of Philadelphia, before this happy change in the posture of the hostile Army. It is said that the cruelties exercised in the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have receivd an answer from the Court, thro the Duke de Grimaldi, to this effect. That the reasons for wishing me not to come to Madrid are insuperable. That the States may depend on the sincere desire of Spain to see their Liberties establishd and to assist them as far as his own situation will permit. For this purpose I had only to direct the House of...
Copy: Harvard University Library We wrote to you pretty fully on the State of Affairs here, in ours of the 12th of March and 19th of this Month, since which there has been little Alteration. There is yet no Certainty of a sudden Declaration of War, but the Preparations go on vigorously both here and in Spain, the Armies of france drawing towards the Sea Coasts, and those of Spain to the...
Three copies: National Archives I reached this three days from Munich and in expectation of hearing from you to Morrow shall not proceed till the 29th. Dresden will be my next Stage. There is a Cold tranquillity here, that bodes us no good. On ne peut pas echauffer la froi deur alle magne [froideur allemande]. From what I learn we need be under no apprehensions from Russia. I hope you will not...
Two copies and transcript: National Archives The post in and nothing from you. I therefore shall proceed to Morrow and hope to reach my destination in eight days. The chief purpose for giving Money in my memorial was to pay the Interest of our Loans and Support our funds. I added the paying the Ship we were obliged to build in Holland in lieu of those requested. To these purposes therefore...
Copy and transcript: National Archives Lee reached Berlin on June 4, and soon discovered that his mission would encounter major obstacles. He announced his arrival to Count Schulenburg, the Prussian Minister, and sent him detailed suggestions about how trade might be established between Prussian and American ports. Out of the correspondence that ensued in the next three weeks the central...
Copy: Harvard University Library; copy and transcript: National Archives; extracts with added paragraph: Harvard University Library, National Archives I have not yet receivd a line from you. It is not easy to divine the reason of so long a silence. There is for sale here and deliverable in any port in France, fourteen thousand weight of brass Cannon at 6 Guineas the Quintal, and Six thousand...
Copy and copy of a second version: Harvard University Library; copy and transcript of the second version: National Archives In my last of the 28 June I mentiond my having been robbd of my Papers, and having retreivd them in a few hours. Whether in that time they were read I cannot ascertain, but I think if they who had them, had examind them, they woud on no account have restord them. In my...
AL : University of Virginia Library Mr. Lee presents his Compliments to Dr. Franklin and Mr. Dean. He has been prevented from waiting upon them this morning as he intended, but will do it this Evening having a Letter to communicate. The Bearer Mr. Floyd will wait to carry Dispatches, if the Gentlemen think it necessary; if not he is sollicitous to go off this Evening, and wants an advance of 7...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. A. Lee presents his Compts. to Dr. Franklin and begs to have the Papers he mentiond to Dr. Franklin, namely Count Vergennes’s Letter, the last Memoire to him, the last Letter to the Committee, and the list of Stores shipt from Marsailles. Mr. L. sends a Newspaper, which Mr. Izard borrowd and desird him to return. Addressed: The Honble / Benjamin Franklin...
AL : American Philosophical Society On November 4 the commissioners learned that the King of Spain, enraged by an American capture of goods belonging to his subjects, had canceled a loan to the United States. Vergennes suggested, according to Arthur Lee’s journal, that a letter to Madrid from the commissioners would doubtless be effective; the King was as quick to forgive as he was to take...
ALS : University of Virginia Library; copy and transcript: National Archives What elicited this letter, as witness the second notation, was one from Dr. John Berkenhout, a shadowy figure who hoped to be Whitehall’s emissary for exploring peace terms, and had initiated a correspondence with Lee on that subject the previous August. Berkenhout’s letter is unsigned and undated, though it refers to...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. A. Lee’s Compliments to Dr. Franklin and Mr. Deane. He receivd a Letter yesterday from Bilboa informing him, that the ten thousand Blankets for which Mr. Lee had remitted money from the spanish fund were ready to be shipt together with a very great quantity of Sail and tent cloth, Anchors, Cables, Cordage and Dreggs but that they must either purchase...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. Lee’s Compliments. Mr. Girard appeared much surprizd at the doubt about the frigate, as he had sent the necessary Dispatches to Passi yesterday which made it plain that no alteration had taken place respecting the frigate at Bordeaux. He thinks Mr. Beaumarchais shoud be desird to bring in his Account, and that we shoud send it to Count V. who will...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I calld at Passi yesterday in expectation of meeting you together, that I might have an explanation of the affair with Mr. Stevenson, in which the whole blame is left to rest most undeservedly on me. I have been informd, that a Letter was written on this subject by Mr. Stevenson to the Commissioners, which has been answerd by you Gentlemen without any...
Transcript: National Archives; incomplete copies: National Archives, Harvard University Library When the conversation turned to day on giving Mr. Williams credit for 200,000 l.t. more on our Banker, as we were just parting there was not time to consider the subject so maturely as the largeness of the demand seems to me to require. But I presume it cannot be either proper or warrantable in us...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am sorry that the things to which I objected having been continued in the Instructions for Capt. Jones prevent me from giving my signature to them except in the manner which I have the honor to send you. I am Gentlemen with great esteem Your most Obedient Servant Notations in different hands: A Lee to BF. & SD / A. Lee to BF. & SD. Lee’s dissent is...
AL : American Philosophical Society The background of this note was Lee’s dispatch from England to the committee of secret correspondence of June 3, 1776. William Carmichael was supposed to deliver it but did not for more than two years; he and Silas Deane opened it, kept it, and used it, Lee believed, to cause trouble for him. The statement about the episode that Lee enclosed with his note is...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; two LS : University of Virginia Library; copies: Harvard University Library, South Carolina Historical Society More mature deliberation and fuller lights upon the subject, have satisfyd me that I was wrong in receding from my opinion against the admissibility of the 12th. Article in the proposd commercial treaty. I shoud therefore think myself neglectful of...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I enclose you a note of the price of Arms in the King of Prussia’s Manufactory, sent me by the Baron Schulenburg; with information that the Director had orders to let us have whatever we orderd. He says they will come cheaper if we do not want them so highly finishd as the King requires them. Shoud you think it proper that any of them shoud be sent to...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: University of Virginia Library I receivd yesterday the above Note, which I do not well understand. Is it intended, as the Note imports, to send away the public Dispatches without any consultation upon them, or about the person, (with whose name I have not been favord,) to whom they are to be confided? I have the honor to be, with great esteem...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy without the postscript: University of Virginia Library The Answer with which you honord me, this day, to my Letter of yesterday, in which I desird to know whether the public Dispatches were to be sent away without any consultation on their Contents, informs me “that you are and were ready to consult with me, whenever I please upon any circumstance...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Titles of the Bills movd for by Ld. North 1st. That leave be given to bring in a Bill to enable his Majesty to appoint Commissioners with sufficient Powers to Treat, consult and agree upon means of quieting the Disorders now subsisting in certain of the Colonies, Plantations and Provinces in North America. 2d. That the Propositions be referrd to the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Harvard University Library; two copies: National Archives; three copies: University of Virginia Library The return of our Dispatches by Mr. Simeon Deane, appears to me to be an event from which great public consequences may flow. I therefore feel it the more extraordinary, that you shoud have taken any steps in it without any consultation with me....
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: Harvard University Library; two copies: University of Virginia Library I must submit my opinion to your judgment as to the propriety of postponing the proposition I mentiond. I am so convincd of the necessity and of its being our indispensible duty to send the Treaties in french, which is stipulated to be the text, that I will employ every moment of...
Copy and transcript: National Archives; copy: University of Virginia Library Mr. A. Lee presents his compliments to Messrs. Franklin and Deane, and begs to know whether tomorrow at 11 oClock will be agreeable for them to consult on what he proposed relative to their being acknowledged. The proposal to obtain French recognition of the commissioners, made in his letter of Feb. 26: above, XXV ,...
AL : American Philosophical Society Mr. A. Lee’s respect to Dr. Franklin. As it is probable the Evening will be dark and bad, which together with the badness of the road at this season will render it very inconvenient for Dr. Franklin to go from Challiot in the Evening; Mr. Lee woud prefer postponing the meeting till to-morrow at Passi. Mr. L. begs the favor of Dr. F. to send him the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy and transcript: National Archives This note and Franklin’s reply, which follows, must have been exchanged in the early hours, for later the same morning Lee called on his friend Lauraguais and told him that the commissioners were withholding the news of Deane’s recall until official confirmation arrived. As early as the 6th Deane himself had heard...
ALS : American Philosophical Society A Gentleman has ask’d particulars of me about a Packet which he says he understood from you was to sail soon with our Dispatches. Nothing having communicated to me on that subject; I beg the favor of you to inform me whether it is so with the name of the vessel, when and from whence she will sail. I have the honor to be with great respect dear Sir Your most...
ALS : American Philosophical Society In consequence of what you mentiond to me relative to the german Courts, I consulted the Spanish Ambassador whether it coud be determind with any degree of certainty, how long it woud be before the business I am pledged for with his Court woud require my attendance. His answer was, that it was altogether uncertain. In this situation it appeard to me that...
LS : American Philosophical Society; copies: Harvard University Library, South Carolina Historical Society, Virginia Historical Society; transcript: National Archives The report I hear of Mr. Deane’s intending soon to leave Paris, obliges me to repeat the request, I long ago and repeatedly made, That we shou’d settle the public accounts relating to the expenditure of the money entrusted to us,...
LS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: National Archives; partial copy: Marquess of Abergavenny, Eridge Castle, Sussex (1955) It was with the utmost surprise, that I learn’d yesterday, that Mr. Girard was to set out in the Evening for America, in a public Character; and that Mr. Deane was to accompany him, without either you or he having condescended to answer my letter of the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; copy: National Archives Mr. Grand has informd me, that Mr. Williams continues drawing upon him, tho he has receivd no Order to answer his Draughts, and I believe has no funds in his hands at present. As this is an irregularity I have thought proper to advise you of it. For myself having never been informd or consulted about the Orders that have been given...
ALS and AL (incomplete draft): American Philosophical Society Not knowing any thing of the transaction referrd to me; nor whether the Captains have given any order for the payment, I cannot judge whether it is fit to discharge the enclosed Accounts. I have the honor to be Sir Your most Obedient and respectful Servant Addressed: To the / Honble B. Franklin / at / Passi Notation: Ar Lee to BF....
Being too much indisposd to come to Passi this morning, and thinking the subjects of the enclosd Letters of pressing importance; I have sent you what I think shoud be written. You will make such Alterations as you think proper. But if the subordinate Servants of the public continue to obey or not obey our Orders as they please—to act as they will, without taking our orders—to involve us in...
ALS : American Philosophical Society <Chaillot, May 17, 1778: Because I am not well enough to come to Passy I send you my drafts of important letters; alter them as you wish. If our subordinates disregard our orders, and involve us in debt without accounting for what they spend, we and the public suffer.> Published in Taylor, Adams Papers , VI , 130.