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Copy: Library of Congress With this, you will receive Dispatches; with which you are to sail with all possible expedition. You will enclose the Dispatches in a Box with Lead, and have it always ready to sink, shoud you be in unavoidable danger of falling into the Enemies hands. To prevent this misfortune, you will constantly keep a good look-out, and be very cautious how you approach any...
In your Letter of the 19 th May last, you were pleased to inform us that you had already accepted Bills which had been drawn on you to a considerable amount by M r. Barclay and Lamb, in consequence of the appropriation which had been made by Congress for forming Treaties with the Barbary Powers; but as we have no advice from you since that date we are at a loss to know whether the whole or...
Desirous as I am of returning you my thanks for the very honorable proof you have given me of your esteem; I cannot wish that this may find you in Port. I am not under the least apprehensions of their succeeding for any time against us personally; but I am afraid they will injure the public and introduce a system of faction and corruption which it will be very difficult to change. For me the...
Your Letter informing me of the Alteration of your Intention, not having reached my House till some time after the Hour you had appointed for setting out for Versailles, I was gone before it arrived. I informed Count Vergennes, that you were coming, and we waited till 5’ O’Clock under no small Embarressment, especially myself, to conceive what detained you. Count Vergennes says, that as there...
My fever not being yet sufficiently removd to permit me to come to you; I write to you to submit the absolute necessity there is of informing the Minister without delay of the State of our Finances and that the Supply we have askd is immediately necessary. It is possible they may wait for such information before they put the intention we are told they have of supplying us in execution. We...
(I) and (II) LS : American Philosophical Society I have been informd that Dr. Bancroft is soon to go to England, charg’d with a Comission from us, or which concerns the trust, which is jointly repos’d in us. I beg the favor of you to inform me whether this is true. I have the honor to be, with the greatest esteem & respect Gentlemen, Your mst. obedient Hble Servt. Addressed: Honble. B....
You had an opportunity of seeing the commencement of this business of Jones and the Alliance, of which I enclose you the suite. Capt. Landais has been orderd from Amsterdam to Passy by Dr. Franklin where the Doctor, M. Chaumont and Dr. Bancroft have held a Court of Enquiry upon his conduct, and their report, I am told, is to be transmitted to Congress. In the mean time Jones has taken...
Give me leave to congratulate you on your happy arrival in your native Country; & on the respectable reception that has attended it. I beg the favor of you to present my congratulations on the same account to Mrs. Adams. Thou I am not an Admirer of the new Constitution, yet as you approve of it & as a great many wise and good men expect much honor & advantage to our Country from the adoption...
The Ratification having this day, the first on which nine States were represented, been unanimously passed; a special Messenger will be immediately dispatchd with it which gives me an opportunity of writing a few words to you which may arrive speedily & safely. The department of foreing Affairs being not yet filld, the business is of course in disorder & neglected. The arrangement of that...
Being at this place, on private business, I cannot omit the opportunity of writing to you. The critical & alarming situation of this Country, makes me extremely anxious to hear the issue of your negociations at S t. James’s. An obstinate adherence, on the part of the british, to thier present commercial system; will, for a time, involve us in great difficulties. But I am persuaded, the...
I am so unwell to-day that I cannot stir out. Will you have the goodness to expedite what is necessary for Mr. Livingston and he will bring the Papers for me to sign. I suppose a Commission, Instructions and our Orders for his sailing will be sufficient. Adieu RC ( PPAmP : Franklin Papers); addressed: “Mr Commissioner Adams Passi”; docketed in an unknown hand: “Hon. A. Lee Esqr to Hon J. Adams...
Yesterday’s advices from England inform us, that Gen. Lincoln was collecting an Army in S. Carolina to meet the Invaders, and that Prévot was to be re-inforcd from N. York; so that it looks as if the War woud be transferd to the Southward. The English loan rises rapidly in its value, as appears by the Omnium, which in a few days mounted from 4 PCt. to 6½. Besides this our Enemies will...
I am obliged to you for yours of the 31st. which I received by Capt. Landais. You will have perceived by my last, that what you write relative to an application to Mr. Grand was what struck me upon reflection. Far from wishing to involve you with such People, I am clearly of opinion that it never will be for your honor or interest, or those of the public, to have any connection with them. The...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have the honor of forwarding you a Letter just receivd. As I know the Gentleman who offers himself to be unexceptionable as to character & abilities he has my approbation, & I hope will meet with yours. I have the honor to be with the greatest respect & esteem Gentlemen Yr. most oblid. Humble Servt Notation: A. Lee Feb. 9. 1779— The preceding letter.
ALS : American Philosophical Society <Chaillot, May 17, 1778: Because I am not well enough to come to Passy I send you my drafts of important letters; alter them as you wish. If our subordinates disregard our orders, and involve us in debt without accounting for what they spend, we and the public suffer.> Published in Taylor, Adams Papers , VI , 130.
I receivd your favor, my dear Sir, by which I percieve you are once more a farmer at Braintree—a real Cincinnatus without being of that noble Body which resembles him in name alone. I am inclined to believe that you also will be calld from your plough to fill the place of Vice President under the new Constitution. Virginia, I think will return Genl. Washington and yourself. If the four New...
I enclose you some late proceedings by which you will perceive that Mr. Laurens is to be made a victim if possible to the system of throwing every thing into one man’s hands. By these votes you will judge pretty accurately who are Devotees to this unjust, unwise, and irrepublican system. Except that of N. Y. where one of the ays was from policy given against the motion of which he was probably...
I have but one moment to tell you, that I left Mrs. Adams your Children, General and Mrs. Warren in good health four days ago. I shall soon set out for Philadelphia. Hancock is chosen Governor, owing cheifly to your absence. I paid a visit to Mrs. Dana at Cambrige, who with her Children are well. Please to remember me to her Husband. Mr. S. A. is at Congress, which is very thin. They have...
LS : American Philosophical Society I perceive by the letter you have sent me that Mr. Deane’s claim is ascertaind by marks, and therefore have signd the letter. But I think enquiry shoud be made after those goods which were bought with the public Money in Holland, and which those now given up were supposd to be. I am unwilling to sign the Letter to Capn. Jones, because it does not contain the...
By the bursting of the Lock of one of my trunks on the journey, I was so unfortunate as to lose the packet of M. Gerards Letters; among which was that you copied, and of which I must beg you to send me an authenticated Copy. Since my arrival here, I receivd a Packet from Congress which came by the Confederacy. In that is the Copy of one of the most false and wicked Papers I have read upon the...
I enclose you my Copy of Capt. Jones’s Instructions. My opinion is that in quitting his Ship without our leave or orders was a breach of his duty—that his continuing here after receiving his orders is a still more flagrant breach of his duty—that we shall be justly blamd, if we do not give him immediate and peremptory orders to proceed to his duty and compel obedience to them. You will see by...
I receivd your favor by Mr. Blodget and thank you. It seems uncertain where or how this will find you, therefore I shall not enclose the Cypher. When I know where a private hand may find you, I will send it so as to be secure. A person is nominated to take the place of the great man at Philada. who will leave it upon his arrival. You will probably get thither before him. We have no other local...
To a written Letter, one of you was civil enough to return me a verbal answer, that Doctor Bancroft was appointed to transact business for us in England, and that his instructions shoud be sent to me. Why you shoud think that in the choice of a person to represent us, I shoud have no voice; I am at a loss to conceive. The notorious character of Dr. Bancroft as a Stockjobber is perfectly known...
I cannot let this opportunity, thõ, from M r. Jefferson’s hurry, a transitory one, pass; without writing you a line. The arrangement of our foreign affairs which makes M r Jay Secretary here, & joins M r. Jefferson with you, must I think be pleasing to you, as they both have a friendship for you & are men of ability. It was my wish that the negociations might be carried on at the Hague or in...
You have often complaind that taking care of the public Papers, and having the business of the Commission done in your rooms; was an unequal share of the public burthen apportiond to you. Whatever may be my sentiments on that point, yet to remove, as far as I can with propriety, all cause of discontent; I am willing to appropriate a room in my House for the meeting and deliberations of the...
By advices from America since my last to you, my Enemies are determind to impeach my attachment to our Country and our her cause, per fas et per nefas. This makes it necessary for me to request of you, your opinion on that point, from the knowlege you have had of my conduct while we acted together in Commission. The Calumnies of wicked men, can only be refuted by the testimony of those who are...
Being too much indisposd to come to Passi this morning, and thinking the subjects of the enclosd Letters of pressing importance; I have sent you what I think shoud be written. You will make such Alterations as you think proper. But if the subordinate Servants of the public continue to obey or not obey our Orders as they please—to act as they will, without taking our orders—to involve us in...
Either my Letter to you of the 29th. March miscarried or you are in my debt. The inclosed MS which belongs to you was seald to go by Mr. Ford and was omitted by mistake. This will be delivered to you by the Chevalier de la Luzerne and M. de Marbois, whom you will find to be Gentlemen worthy of the important trusts they fill. I am much obliged to you for your kindness to Mr. Ford, and hope you...
LS : American Philosophical Society Your Letter informing me of the Alteration of your Intention, not having reached my House till some time after the Hour you had appointed for setting out for Versailles, I was gone before it arrived. I informed Count Vergennes, that you were coming, & we waited till 5’ O’Clock under no small Embarressment, especially myself, to conceive what detained you....
I have hoped for Leisure to answer your favor as fully as, in my own Vindication, it demands. There are matters touched in it, which imply a Censure upon me, which a recapitulation of facts, I am satisfied, would convince you is unjust. But as I dispair of sufficient Leisure for some time, I must content myself with replying to what is immediately necessary. A desire to remove as much as I...