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This Letter Will Be delivered By Mr Geo. Flower Who is Going over With an intention to Settle in America . I know Him to Be one of the Most desirable Acquisitions the U.S. Can Make. His departure from England is Suspended Untill a Line of introduction from me to You Can Reach Him. While it Shows the proper Sense He Has of Your Acquaintance, I find in it a Very pleasing Gratification, as Mr...
AD (draft): Library of Congress 1. The Burning of Charleston (Date) A fine Town by the Waterside, being a Port, but without any Defence. A Spire rising among the Houses, belonging to the House of Worship. A Belfrey belonging to the Town House all in Flames.— The Inhabitants had all left it. 2. The Burning of Falmouth (Date Nov. 1775) A fine Town & Port, but without Defence Ships firing hot...
La nature a fait les hommes egaux, et les distinctions entre eux necessitées par la monarchie, ont pour base, et doivent avoir pour mesure l’utilité generale. Les droits de l’homme assurent sa proprieté, sa liberté, son honneur, sa vie; nulle atteinte ne peut y etre portée qu’en vertu de loix consenties par lui, ou ses representans, anterieurement promulguées, et appliquées par un tribunal...
L : American Philosophical Society Mr et Mde. La Marquise De lafayette et Mr. De Gouvion profiteront avec grand plaisir de l’Invitation de Monsieur Franklin et auront l’honneur de Diner chez lui Dimanche. The earliest possible year, though the note could also have been written in 1785. Lafayette’s former aide Gouvion ( XXIII , 160–1n) was in America on March 27 from 1777 through 1781 ( XXXVI ,...
This Letter will Be delivered By M r Jullien a Citizen distinguished By His Litterary and political knowledge as well as By His patriotic Sentiments. He Has Been for a Long time employ’d in the Commissariat and offices of the military department and Has particularly Applied His Studies to the Line of education. Being desirous to visit the U. S. , altho’ He is not on the lists of proscription,...
While You are Honorably Engaged in patriotic Concerns for which my feelings Have not Ceased, during Six and thirty Years, to be truly American, I don’t Like to intrude on Your time With observations Relative to My private affairs. Yet the Correspondance is Now So Uncertain that I will not miss a Good opportunity to trouble you with a few Selfish Lines. I am much pleased to preface them with...
I Have Been Honoured with Your favour By Mr̃ Joy to Whom I Will Readily Render Every Service in My power, and am also to thank You for the Valuable Books You took the trouble to Collect for me—in the Cause of My Black Brethren I feel Myself Warmly interested, and Most decidedly Side, so far as Respects them, Against the White part of Mankind— Whatever Be the Complexion of the Enslaved, it does...
It is a Melancholy thought to Me that While I Could Be So Happy at Mount Vernon, I am Still Almost As much Separated from you as I have Been for five Years in the Coalitionary prisons—But Altho’ I Lament, yet I Cannot Repent the determination we Have Been obliged to take—Much Less on Account of My Health which Has Been Recovering fast Enough, than for the very Bad and Lingering Condition in...
I have the honor to forward a dispatch recommended by the president of Congress, to be sent to you by a particular conveyance. Lieut. Stokely is charged with it, and directed to deliver it into your own hands. Lord Cornwallis was at Birds yesterday, from which place he retired with his main body, into Williamsburg. We have been pressing his rear, with our light parties, supported by the army,...
I hope you have receiv’d my letter from Cramberry where I aquaint you that I am going to hice town tho’ we are schort of provisions—when I got there I was very sorry to hear that Mister hamilton who had been riding all the night had not been able to find any body who could give him certain intelligences—but by a party who comes back I hear the ennemy are in motion, and theyr Rear about one...
I Have Received Your first favour from Philadelphia with the Greater Satisfaction, as it promises me the pleasure to Hear Again from you Before long —a pleasure, My Beloved General, which Your friend’s filial Heart wants to Anticipate, and Enjoys most Affectionately—I Have not Been surprised to Hear of Your Attendance at the Convention, and would indeed Have wondered at a denial—on the success...
From the Bottom of My Heart I Congratulate you upon the Arrival of the French Fleet—Some Rumors Had Been spread, and spy accounts sent out—But no Certainty untill the Admiral’s dispatches Came to Hand—Inclosed I send you His letter and that of Mis. de St Simon Both of whom I Request you will Have translated By Tilmangh or Gouvion alone as there are parts of them personal which I do not choose...
On my Long wished Return to my farm and to a family Circle, it becomes a firm object for me to let You Hear from me, and to Entreat some Lines Acquainting me with the State of Your Health and personal Concern. this packet is Intrusted to M r frederick Jacquemone , the worthy Son of my Intimate friend who in the times of the Repu can Government was at the Head of the direction for public...
… [France has ordered] two large Armies to get in readiness … in Flanders and … in Alsace.… I hope matters will be compromised and a War avoided…. Your Ministers will write you more than I can respecting their negotiations…. Our friend Mr. jefferson has been unwell but now feels better…. Remember me to the Governor and all friends in Virginia.… Printed extract (Charles Hamilton Catalogue No....
While I was indulging the Hope to See M r Coles at La Grange , to possess Him Some days in our family, to go with Him to Aulnay where M r et M de de tessé , expected the pleasure to Receive Him, I Have Been Yesterday informed of His Sudden departure—I immediately Came to town, But am much Vexed at My disappointment—The impression M r Coles Has made Upon me Makes me Heartily Regret Not to Have...
Your letter of the 10th of May is the last one that Came into My Hands for which I Beg leave to offer You My Best thanks—and in Case former Answers do not Arrive, I Must Again tell you How Happy You Made Your friend By Your letters inclosing the proceedings of the Army—In Every instance, My dear General, I Have the Satisfaction to Love and to Admire you—the Conduct You Had on that Occasion was...
Your kind favour, May 10h, is an additional proof of the friendly Concern in My Behalf for Which I Beg Leave to Repeat My Most Affectionate Thanks. The instruction issued from the General land office ought, it Seems, to Have procured the Certificate Necessary, But Sufficient, to obtain a patent. That Some thing in the Secondary Measures at New orleans Has Been Wanting Appears to Be pretty Well...
Altho’ the Affair for Which I presume to Adress You Has Been Recommended and Elucidated by the Governement of this Country, and altho’ My friends the Heirs Beaumarchais Are Giving an Account of the Business, Which to Mr Munroe Has Appeared Satisfactory, and Will, I think, Equally Satisfy Mr Livingston, I feel Myself, on two Accounts, Impelled to Unite My private Voice to those public...
I Have Been Honoured with your favor of the 14th and while I am to thank you for the pains You took of Acquainting me with particulars Relative to Col. Ross, I feel a sincere pleasure in this opportunity to Continue our Correspondance. The Honor of Hearing from you Shall Ever Be wellcome, and I Beg leave from time to time to present You with the Camp Gazette, and with the assurance of My...
Before this Comes to Hand Your Excellency Will Have Got an Accurate Account of the Action Between the two fleets, where it Appears that Notwistanding their Inferiority Our Allies obtained the Honor of the day. But the Object of the Expedition was Lost, and the Attak of Portsmouth Unfortunately Post poned. On the Point of Setting out for the Grand Army, I will at least do My Best for the Relief...
Here I am Arrived in the fond Expectation to See of Sunday morning, But find myself once more disappointed in my Eagerness to Reach Monticelo; the kindness of our friends on the Road will Make the Journey less Expeditious than I Had intended it, and the Great Business of the elections on Monday Has Coincided with those preparations to make it inconvenient for many to receive us on that day. I...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am just Coming from Versailles where I went à hunting with the king, and I Do take this first opportunity of inquiring for the state of your health— I hope you are free by this time from your troublesome Gout— I make no doubt but that you knew last Night of the Senegal being taken by our troops— that Advantage I think is interesting for the Allied powers,...
L : American Philosophical Society Le Mis. De la fayette fait Ses compliments à Monsieur franklin et le prie de lui faire lhonneur de Venir diner chez luy jeudy prochain en Sa maison Rue de Bourbon. May 1. The other American peace commissioners went as well: Butterfield, John Adams Diary , III , 117. Having reached the age of majority (25 years), Lafayette was able to purchase a house on the...
I am sorry to hear from Major Gibs that My letter of last Night did not Reach you Before your departure from head quarters—it had been written at one o’clock, as soon as I took my position for the Night, and intrusted to Clel Ogden who promis’d to send it By an officer acquainted with the Roads. depending upon your Communication of the sad intelligence to Cher de la luzerne, I did not send to...
I can not let go back my guide without taking this opportunity of wraiting to your excellency tho’ I have not yet public business to speak of—I go on very slowly some times pierced by rain, sometimes covered with snow, and not thinking many handsome thoughts about the projected incursion into canada —if succèss were to be had it would surprise me in a more agreable manner, by that very reason...
4 June 1805, La Grange . “Permit me to Introduce and Recommend to You Mm. Armand de Letten and Casimir Rham, Swiss Gentlemen, and Near Relations to My Worthy friends Mm de Letten. I Much Wish My interest in their Behalf May promote the kind Wellcome and Occasional Services to which their own Merit Entitles them.” RC ( PHi ). 1 p. Henry Casimir De Rham (1785–1873) established himself as a...
These are, my dear Hamilton, two letters By which I communicate to the french general the happy intelligence Concerning the taking of the Convoy, and inclose to them the paper that Relates the affair as well as the success of the expedition on the Spanish Main. I give you joy, my dear friend, on this success of the Combin’d fleet, and Might also Rejoice with you on some thing else By way of...
The Arrival of Mr. Crawford and two Letters from our friend Monroe and david parish Have informed me that You Were in Good Health. I Expect the pleasure of a letter from You along With the patents which You Have Been pleased to Entrust to Mm Gallatin and Bayard. They Will probably find Means to Convey them before the End of the Year. A Communication I Meant to Open through one of the...
I Beg for liberty’s sake You will Breack Every Engagement to Give us a dinner to Morrow Wenesday. We shall Be some Members of the National Assembly—eight of us whom I want to Coalize as Being the only Means to prevent a total dissolution and a civil war. The dificulty Between them is the King’s veto. Some want it Absolute, others will Have no Veto, and the only way to Unite them is to find...
[. . .] [. . .]ngston Has [. . .] My frien[. . .] [. . .] you and the philosophical Society With two Copies of a Work [Which], [not]wistanding the Actual turn of the public Spirit, Has Attracted Much Notice in France, and Will I am Sure Appear to You a Very Distinguished performance—An other Friend of Mine, Cen Tracy , My Colleague in the Constituent Assembly, My Son’s Father in Law, Now a...
Le Mis. De la Fayette a l’honneur de faire ses compliments à Monsieur Jefferson et lui envoye la lettre de Mr. Le Cte. De Florida Blanca. Il verra que dans ce tems l’article des Limites avoit été différemment reglé que les prétensions Espagnoles ne semblent l’annoncer. L’original de cette lettre fut envoye dans le tems au Congres. Une Copie remise à Mr. Jay mais il n’y eut rien de plus de fait...
Mr. Livingston is Going—I Heartily Lament Not to Accompany Him—it is Necessary for me to Hope You Will Approve My Motives, not only those I Have Stated in former Letters; the Copies of Which I Beg Leave to Inclose, But those also Which in Confidential Conversations He Will more particularly Explain—My Heart is known to You, My dear friend, and if You think You Have to Blame me for Mistaken...
ALS : American Philosophical Society; transcript: Harvard University Library I Had the Night Before Last the pleasure to See Mr. franklin and Gave Him some Account of the Situation our Affair Was in at that time. I Can for the Present be More Particular, and will Relate What Has Past Respecting the letter of Mr. de Veymerange and the Several Articles a list of which Has Been put into My Hands....
A Man is just Arriv’d at My quarters who says that the Cork fleet Arriv’d in Newyork on Sunday last—his informant saw himself thirty six vessels Coming up—the Man adds that Gnl Smith is gone to the City and suppos’d to embark with this late envoy of troops—But I don’t put a perfect dependance on what he says nor on the inclos’d letter he has Brought me from Merc ereau —I am sure that the...
I have Receiv’d your excellency’s favor notifying your arrival at cramberry and am glad to have anticipated your orders in not going too far—I have felt the unhappy effects of the want of provisions for I dare say if we had not been Stopp’d by it, as we were already within three miles of the ennemy’s rear, we would very easely have overtaken them, and fouht with advantage. I have Consulted the...
to My Great disappointment Mr P—— is Return’d this Morning and Brings no details with him—I Wanted him to Go Again, But You alone Can induce him to do it—from what he Says, the Ennemy are going to undertake A great Movement—he will himself wait on you and tell you what had been Said to him about Rhode island, and what about improving the opportunity of theyr fleet’s going to London—tho I do...
Your orders have reach’d me so late, and found me in such a situation that it will be impossible to follow them as soon as I could wish—it is not on account of any other motive than the impossibility of moving the troops and making Such a march immediately for in receiving your letter I have given up the project of attaking the ennemy, and I only wish to join general lee —I was even going to...
However Silent You May please to Be, I will Nevertheless Remind You of a friend who loves You tenderly and who By His Attachment Desires a Great share in Your Affection. This letter, My dear Sir, Will Be delivered or sent By Count de Segur, an intimate friend of Mine, A Man of Wit and of Abilities, and whose Society You will Certainly Be pleased With. I Warmly Recommend Him to You, and Hope He...
I Have Had some time Ago the pleasure to write you a letter the duplicate of which shall Accompany this —The intelligence Has Since Come to Us of your Having Accepted the Command of the Armies—But you will Not be the less pleased to hear of the dispositions to a fair Reconciliation on the part of the French directory which I Hope will be Reciprocated By the American Governement—To what I took...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. Lafayette, c.30 Oct. 1778. GW wrote Vice Admiral d’Estaing on 31 Oct. : “I received a letter yesterday from the Marquis.”
Your last letter, my dear Excellent friend, is dated the 26 th I Had been long deprived of your so much Valued Correspondence. The motives of Health, and sickness in the wrist unluckily dislocated and Very ill mended, form an Apology but too forcible, but very painful. I would have put you to inconvenience, but when you can well Bear writing, think of your oldest and best friend, to whom Some...
Before Your letter Came to Hand M. de Mirabeau Had engaged to disown what He Had Advanced. On the Receipt of Yours He did more, He Undertook to Read it to the Assembly, and telling Every thing that was in it He layd it on the table. Some Body Undertook to translate it, and the House Called for the Reading of the translation. I Confess I thought it indelicate, if Not for Mirabeau’s feelings at...
Your letters Become More and More distant, and I Anxiously Wish for your Speedy Appointement to the Presidency, in order that You May Have a More Exact Notice of the Opportunities to Write to Me. This Will not tell you Much of politics. The two Imperial Courts are preparing for a Vigorous Campaign Against the turks. Russia intends Sending a Squadron into the Mediterranean, and altho’ it does...
Mr Rapatel aid de Camp to General Moreau is going to America where He wishes His Services May Be Accepted. He is an officer distinguished By His Interest His Character and Several Actions of Eclat. His Numerous Brothers are, as well as Himself faithfully Attached to the patriotic Cause. the Honor He Had to Serve in Gnl Moreau’s family ought to Have Recommended Him at Any time and with Every...
Altho’ I Cannot omit an opportunity of writing to You, my letter will not Be so long and Minuted as I would like to make it, Because of the Constant Hurry of Business occasioned By the Assembly—every day, Sundays excepted, is taken up with General Meetings, Committee’s, and smaller Boards—it is a pretty extraordinary sight at Versailles, the more so as great deal of patriotism and firmness Has...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I intended Having this day the pleasure to See You, But am obliged to Stay Here for the Queen’s Concert, and Will do Myself the Honour to Call Upon You to Morrow Morning— Then I will lay Before You a letter I Have Received from mr. de Calonne— I am glad to Hear the Washington is Soon Expected, and Hope we May Get intelligences Before My departure which is...
I have Receiv’d three different Accounts from Newyork, and tho’ the Authorities Are Not unquestionable—I will lay them before you that we May Compare them with other Accounts. A man Sent in By dr Burnet Says that part of the Cork fleet is Arriv’d, betwen twenty and forty Sails—that the Rest is given over for lost—the troops in Newyork about 1500—at Bergen 250—there was an alarm on the 15th at...
Was I to found my Hopes Upon the Letters I have from Congress, I would please my fancy with the Expectation of Wellcoming You to the European Shore—and Yet, when I Remember Your obstinate plans of life, I am affraid least my Warm Wishes Should be disappointed—in the Mean While, I will Continue writing, and By the Way Will advise You to send Your Answers By the packets Rather than By a private...
As you will Receive a letter from Gal St Clair Who had been desir’d by Congress to Go with me to the Pensilvania line, I have Nothing to add But that I am here with him, and that I Impatiently wait for Your Arrival which has been Announc’d by Mjor Fishburne on his Going through this place. This Affair is the More Serious as the Men have Appointed a Committee Compos’d of Theyr Ring Leaders...
This letter is not By Any Means directed to the Commander in chief, But to My Most Intimate and Confidential friend—I will lay Before you My Circumstances and My wishes—Certain I am You will do whatever You Can for me that is Consistent with Your public duty. When I went to the Southward You know I Had Some private objections—But I Became Sensible of the Necessity there was for the detachement...