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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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MS ( DLC : TJ Papers, 36:6252–3); in an unidentified clerk’s hand, with marginal note by TJ; endorsed by him: “Fayette. His decln. of rights”; undated, but this state of the text probably belongs to the end of June or the beginning of July 1789. This text represents an intermediate state of Lafayette’s proposed declaration of rights between that transmitted by TJ to Madison on 12 Jan. 1789 and...
I Most Heartily thank You, My dear friend, for Your Excellent ideas. What will Become of the States Generals God knows. Our House Has this Morning protested Against the Appellation of Commons , and the Commons Have said there Must Be No intermediaire Between them and the King. It is true they Meant the Ministers But we took it for us. In the Mean While the King and Queen are on the...
This Morning Has Been Employed in Hearing the Report of a Committee for Subsistance and As they were Going to Vote thanks to Administration Mr. de Mirabeau Rose and said He Could Give proofs to the House that You Had Made offers to obtain flour from America which Have Been Refused—He Announced His Motion On that Head for to Morrow, and Means to Ground on this an Attack Against Administration....
Before Your letter Came to Hand M. de Mirabeau Had engaged to disown what He Had Advanced. On the Receipt of Yours He did more, He Undertook to Read it to the Assembly, and telling Every thing that was in it He layd it on the table. Some Body Undertook to translate it, and the House Called for the Reading of the translation. I Confess I thought it indelicate, if Not for Mirabeau’s feelings at...
M. de Mirabeau’s Affair brought me Under difficulties and Almost a Quarell with the Ministry. He Had Engaged to Retract Before Your letter Came to Hand. He did it, and Besides read your letter, and laid it on the table. Some Body Undertook to translate it, which He did Very ill, and Many in the House asked for the Reading of this translation. But as M. de MiRabeau Had said Every word which...
I Beg for liberty’s sake You will Breack Every Engagement to Give us a dinner to Morrow Wenesday. We shall Be some Members of the National Assembly—eight of us whom I want to Coalize as Being the only Means to prevent a total dissolution and a civil war. The dificulty Between them is the King’s veto. Some want it Absolute, others will Have no Veto, and the only way to Unite them is to find...
I Cannot let the packet Sail without a line from your filial friend, who, altho’ He depends on Mr Short for your information, wants to Express you those Affectionate and Respectful Sentiments that Are Never So well felt as in UnCommon Circumstances—How often, My Beloved General, Have I wanted your wise Advices and friendly Support! We Have Come thus far in the Revolution without Breaking the...
Amidst the agitations of our revolution, I have always participated in the pleasure which Mr de La Fayette found in following your footsteps, in observing, according to your example and your lessons, the means of serving his country, and in thinking with what satisfaction you would learn the effects and success of them. Permit me, to offer you the assurance of this sentiment and permit at the...
Paris, 1 Feb. 1790. He asks TJ to be of service to M. Minguée, who is leaving for America to “faire un établissement” on the Scioto river, having served with patriotism and zeal in the national Parisian army from the beginning of the Revolution, and from whose great friend, the “Gouverneur de mon fils,” he has just received new testimony in his favor. [P.S.] “I don’t know, My dear friend, When...
It is with the Utmost Concern that I Hear My letters Have Not Come to Hand, and While I lament the Miscarriage, I Hope You do Not impute it to Any fault on My part —In these time of troubles, it Has Become More difficult to Know, or to Reach Opportunities, and How this Will be Carried I leave to the Care of Mr Payne Who Goes to London. Our Revolution is Getting on as Well as it Can With a...