You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Lafayette …
  • Period

    • Jefferson Presidency

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 3

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Jefferson Presidency"
Results 1-45 of 45 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
The Necessity of an Active Correspondance with the U.S. Has never been Better Evinced than on the Arrival of a West India Rumour which would Have dreadfully Alarmed us, Had we not Been in the Blessed Possession of Your Own Letters. I Hope You will never leave Your friends in Europe Without Regular Intelligence of Your personal Welfare. the Want of it I feel, the More, My dear Jefferson, as It...
The Answer to Your kind and Welcome Letter By the Arcturus Has Been Already forwarded By General Armstrong—But in the Situation of This Side of the Atlantic and the Intermediary Seas duplicates are not a Superfluous Measure to insure a Safe Arrival on the American Shore. I Shall therefore improve the Opportunity of two or three Vessels Just Going But only to write a few lines and Copies of...
Your Good Letter inclosed in the Official dispatches by the St. Michael Has Afforded me Great Comfort. No Balm Can Be Applied to a Suffering Heart More Soothing than the Sympathising Affection and Regrets of Such a friend as You—While I Have So often with Her Lamented the Loss of Your Happiness I did not foresee that Before Long I should Be Entitled to a Reciprocity of Your Condoling Pity—and...
Permit me, my dear friend, to inclose the Copy of my Last Letter to You—there Have Been, since that date, Great Changes in Europe, all Coming from and Congenial to one System and depending on one Man—My Situation is the Same as when I made Your friendly Heart a partaker in the Miseries of an irretrievable Loss, and inconsolable Grief, and when, forced to Appear importunate, I insisted on the...
The only intelligence I Have derived from the last packet Are that You Have Been ill but Had Recovered Your Health, and that You Are Going to be Made a president of the United States. My feelings on Every One of these Accounts You do Not Question. I am Equally Sure of Your Sympathising Concern for the Cruel Loss Which Has devoted to Eternal Grief a Heart Hitherto Superior, I Can Say, to...
Altho’ my Letter by Young Mr. McHenry Had Not Reached You, I am sure You Have by this time Heard of My Unhappy fate. The Wife whose Loss I am left to Mourn Has Been Long known to You—in Her, as Every Moment of an Union of Thirty four Years, I Have found the Greatest Blessing My Heart Could Wish for and more than a Compensation for Every possible Misfortune—The Great and Amiable character She...
The Constant Mourning of Your Heart will be deepened by the Grief I am doomed to impart. Who Better than You can Sympathise for the Loss of a Beloved Wife? The Angel who for thirty four Years Has blessed My Life was to You an Affectionate, Grateful friend—pity me, my dear Jefferson, and believe me for Ever, with all My Heart, Yours Mr. and Mde. de Tessé, at Whose House We Have Attended Her...
I Cannot Resist an Opportunity to write to You—there is for me the Heartfelt Consolation in Expressing the Anguish I feel to a friend Ever, and in this Instance more Than Ever Ready to Sympathise with me— My Wife is Under the pains and danger of a Malignant fever which Has Been preceded By a thermic desease of a Very obscure Nature— There Have Been for Some time fears of an Obstruction of the...
The Last Vessels have brought me nothing from you, Unless some miscarriage has taken place which I would not Wonder at, But I have received two Letters from our respected President, and as I have by this Opportunity aknowledged them, I will not repeat what he will, no doubt Communicate. The State of Public affairs You will find fully explained in your official Dispatches, Nor do I Know at this...
Your Letters of the 26. May and 14th. July are come to me nearly at the same time—The older in date a few days latter—In both I have enjoyed your most precious friendship—Your account of Burr’s conspiracy was eagerly expected, and while I abhorr his liberticide projects I am happy in a new instance of the impractibility of such a perversion of men and things on the Land of freedom—I also...
Mr. de Montarby who is Going to America wishes to be by me presented to You, and am Happy with opportunity to oblige so deserving a Gentleman. Several Circumstances Have prompted him to Accept a proposal of Mm. Fouston and Ravel , one of the Most Respectable Houses in Europe, And Render them, in the U.S., Services which will Give Him the Happiness, much envied by me, to Visit the shores of...
So Long a time Has Elapsed, Since I Had the pleasure to Hear from You that I think it Better for fear of Omissions or Repetitions to inclose Copies of two Letters Sent of triplicate the Answers to which Are Eagerly Expected My Sentiments Have been During thirty Years so well known and proved to You that it is Almost Superfluous to Mention What I felt at the painful tho imperfect intelligence...
Permit me to inclose the Copy of a Letter which has been adressed to you in november Last—Your information of public Concerns in Europe through the Ministerial Channels Cannot fail to be as regular and exact as I could give it from Lagrange. What I was writing about the Oder has been proved true for the Vistule and is in train to be verified on the banks of more Easterly Rivers—My Son Son in...
To your Diplomatic Correspondence I refer you for European Intelligence. The Prussian power is no more. Every Prince of this Side of the Vistula is depending on the Conqueror’s Nod for his Reward or Punishment. The french Arms have been this fall more irresistible than ever. The European Continent Will be in the Course of the Winter new Modelled As far as novelty can be produced in Royal...
I Have lately So Much Trespassed on Your time that I Will Not to day trouble You Again With Louïsiana Affairs, and Plans of pecuniary Liberation. Permit me only to Mention the Case of a Beloved Creditor, Mr. Erick Bollman, to Whom Besides the immense debt of My Gratitude, I find Myself indebted for Six thousand francs. You Know that independant of the Mortgage Upon the Lands, I Will Be able to...
Permit me, My dear friend, to Inclose the Copies of Letters to You, mr Madison, and mr Duplantier which set out this day by a direct Opportunity, So that I shall only Add the Expression of my Affectionate, Grateful Respect and friendship DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson. The Letters to Mr. Madison and M. Duplantier which accompagny this are so full of my Louisiana Concerns that I need not...
Altho’ I have not this long while heard from you, I have Had very material proofs of your’s and our Beloved President’s Rememberance. Letters from Louisiana were brought to me by a Respectable merchant Late Mayor of New Orleans and particularly introduced by Governor Claiborne. He had a letter from M. Duplantier giving me Several informations and for the remainder refering me to the bearer...
Your Letter of the 6h. June, My dear friend, or Rather a Copy of it from the press Has Come to Hand. I think it is the duplicate of one Which Has Been Lost, and By the Bye I Caution You Against the Ink of Your Copying press, as the Whiteness of it Has Rendered it Very difficult for General Armstrong and for me to Read the Respective dispatches You Have on that day Adressed to Us. Yet I Have...
Mr. David parish, now a french Citizen, and Inhabitant of Antwerpt is Going to Visit America. The Character of His House, His family, and Himself will Sufficiently Introduce Him. But I am Happy in this Instance to Indulge a lively Sentiment of friendship, and a deep Sense of Obligations to Him and His Worthy parents. Mr. John parish His father, during our Captivity of olmütz, Was the American...
4 June 1805, La Grange . “Permit me to Introduce and Recommend to You Mm. Armand de Letten and Casimir Rham, Swiss Gentlemen, and Near Relations to My Worthy friends Mm de Letten. I Much Wish My interest in their Behalf May promote the kind Wellcome and Occasional Services to which their own Merit Entitles them.” RC ( PHi ). 1 p. Henry Casimir De Rham (1785–1873) established himself as a...
This Letter will Be presented By Mm. Armand de Leller and Casimir Rham two Swits Gentlemen, Near Relations to My Excellent friends Mm. de Leller. Permit me to ReCommend them to You, and as they will Be Long on their Way I only Add the Expression of My Grateful Affection and Respect DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Mr Rapatel aid de Camp to General Moreau is going to America where He wishes His Services May Be Accepted. He is an officer distinguished By His Interest His Character and Several Actions of Eclat. His Numerous Brothers are, as well as Himself faithfully Attached to the patriotic Cause. the Honor He Had to Serve in Gnl Moreau’s family ought to Have Recommended Him at Any time and with Every...
Mr. Livingston is Going—I Heartily Lament Not to Accompany Him—it is Necessary for me to Hope You Will Approve My Motives, not only those I Have Stated in former Letters; the Copies of Which I Beg Leave to Inclose, But those also Which in Confidential Conversations He Will more particularly Explain—My Heart is known to You, My dear friend, and if You think You Have to Blame me for Mistaken...
The Arrival of General Armstrong is the Last Opportunity I Had to Hear from You—I Was More fortunate as to public intelligences—The Reelection of our dear Respected president, and of Course the Continuation in Office of His Collaborators, With the Speech Worthy of Him He Has pronounced Have Speedily Enough Been Received in paris Where I Came to Confer with Gnl. Armstrong and Mr Livingston—of...
Your letter June the 27th, with a post Script of the 11th. July, is the last from You I Have Received—there I found New Motives for Grateful feelings and Serious thoughts—it Became the Matter of Conferences with Mm. Livingston, Monroe, and Armstrong, Where each of Us Endeavoured to Guess and follow What Would Have Been, on the Spot, Your Sense of public duties and personal Situations—they Have...
Here I am with my son and daughter in law who is going to increase our family. Her father is to stand god father to the child and if He is a Boy we intend taking the liberty to give Him Your Name. You Have No Greater Admirers in the world than my two friends Tracy and Cabanis who live quietly in this village, going now and then to an insignificant Senate and employing their time in...
I Have on the 8th Octobre Adressed You with a long Confidential Letter and Entrusted it to Mr. Livingston—Since Which General Armstrong Has delivered Your kind favor of June the 27th With the Subsequent Informations You Have Been pleased to Send for me. In Every part of those transactions I find Myself Under Such Obligations to Your friendship that While I have words to Express them, I feel I...
I have two days ago written a long Letter to M. Jefferson which as it will be communicated to you leaves me nothing here to Speack of but Landed Property & pecuniary Plans—The last matter among so many, I would have wanted to entertain you upon, had not every other been debated in that first part of my correspondence. You will no doubt feel with me, when in my Answer to our respected friend I...
My Letter of the 1st July Had Made You Expect a More particular Answer to Your important Communications—Yet, However impelled I was By friendship Gratitude, and American patriotism, it Has Become impossible for me to find a proper Opportunity—I Have Been detained at the Hot Springs of Mont d’or from Which I derived Much Benefit and the probability, in a Second pilgrimage, to Compleat My Cure—I...
I Have Received Your kind Letter dated March the 30th, and while I most deeply feel my new obligations to Your friendship I wish I Could Conveniently express the Respectful sense I have of the additional favor Congress have been pleased to confer upon me—but I Have only a few moments to improve the Opportunity that Offers—Permit me therefore Merely to Aknowledge the Receipt of Your letter, and...
I am Happy in the Opportunity to present to You Mr David Parish a Worthy Member of the Respectable family to Whom I am Attached By intimate ties of Gratitude and Affection. His father, Mr John Parish was Consul of the United States in Hamburgh When My Wife and Daughters Arrived there on their Way to Olmutz. in Him they found Hearty Welcome, friendly Advices, Generous Support—nor did ever...
Give me leave to present to You M. L’ Herbette a french Citizen of a Respectable family, Great personal Merit, and to Whose Worthy Uncle I am Under Obligations the Nearest to the Heart—I know this introduction will insure to Him Your Good Wishes and kind Patronage—With the Highest Regard and Most friendly Affection I am Yours RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received “by mr L’Herbette ” on 16...
This Letter Will Be Delivered By M. de foncin Whose Abilities as an Engeneer, and Whose personal Character Entitle Him to Your particular Notice—our Acquaintance with Him dates from a time Not Unknown to You When an Enterprise Had Been Made at Cayenne for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery—M. de foncin’s zeal on the Occasion, and His Actual perseverance in the principles of Humanity and Justice...
I Have received my dear Friend, your Letter, May the 1st. and it has been a most lively heartfelt pleasure for me to revise the Expression of a Friendship on which my dependance has ever been entire as it was deeply founded on the Reciprocity of my Sentiments for you. I Hope you have had my Letters of Congratulation for the happy Cession of Louisiana to the United States. An Event which the...
Altho I Have Not for Many Years Heard from You, I Hope that if You Have Received a Long Letter of Mine writen a few months Ago, I may Before Long Expect Your wished for Answer. Let me Here Repeat My joyful and patriotic Congratulations for the Accession of Louisiana, and the future one of the floridas to the United States—indeed I am Also to Rejoice as a french man; the Entanglemen of this...
Altho’ the Affair for Which I presume to Adress You Has Been Recommended and Elucidated by the Governement of this Country, and altho’ My friends the Heirs Beaumarchais Are Giving an Account of the Business, Which to Mr Munroe Has Appeared Satisfactory, and Will, I think, Equally Satisfy Mr Livingston, I feel Myself, on two Accounts, Impelled to Unite My private Voice to those public...
In the Joy of my heart I congratulate you on the happy arrangement which has Lately taken place—The occupation of Louisiana by the French Governement was big with Evils—I doubly felt them—Now I see for the United States noble boundaries, and for that Vast Country the insurance of Liberty and republican Union—How happy I am in that transaction I want Words to Express With respectful and...
I would like by this opportunity to write to you a long letter, but having been Laying on my back for two months past, and being for three weeks to come, doomed to the same situation, I must confine myself to a few lines written near my bed. The particulars of the accident and his cure will be given to you by General Bernadotte, whom I must particularly introduce and his lady to Mrs. Hamilton...
General Bernadotte is so gloriously introduced by his own reputation, and Character, that I shall only present him to you as my personal friend. He is of all men the one I would better like to see going to America as an ambassador, was he not also the man, whom all true and steady patriots cannot but heartily wish to keep nearer to his own country, where none surpass, and but few can equal the...
Letter not found. 4 January 1803, Paris. Offered for sale in Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 686 (11–12 May 1892), item 1504, where it is described as a three-page letter in Lafayette’s hand.
Had I Not a proper Reliance on the Steadiness of Your Sentiments I Might fear You Have forgotten the old friend Who Has Not for Many, Many Years Received one Line from You. But I Conclude from the feelings of My Own Heart that Your Reciprocal Affection to Me Has not diminished, and that through the Vicissitudes of a Life as Stormy as it is Now Quiete, I Have Been Accompagnied With Your...
[. . .] [. . .]ngston Has [. . .] My frien[. . .] [. . .] you and the philosophical Society With two Copies of a Work [Which], [not]wistanding the Actual turn of the public Spirit, Has Attracted Much Notice in France, and Will I am Sure Appear to You a Very Distinguished performance—An other Friend of Mine, Cen Tracy , My Colleague in the Constituent Assembly, My Son’s Father in Law, Now a...
On My Coming for a few Days to Paris I find two Opportunities to write to You and Am Happy to Repeat the Expression of My old Constant Affectionate Regard—Mr Levingston’s Official Correspondance and that of Mr King, Now in this place Will Let You know All the politics of Europe—The Interior politics of France I Have No pleasure to Expatiate Upon, Nor Can You fail Anticipating My Sentiments on...
I Have not this Long While Had the pleasure of a Letter from You —Yet I Hope You Have Received the Heartfelt Expressions of my old, Constant friendship, and the Affectionate, patriotic Wishes Which Accompagny You in a Station Where the Welfare of the United States, and the Cause of liberty are So Highly Interested—So Confused Have Been the Ideas of Europe that Never She Could be So Much...
I Had Been a Long While Without Hearing from You When Your Welcome Hand Appeared Again in the Letter of Which Mr. dawson Was the Bearer—I Hastened to Paris that I Might Receive Intelligences of our Beloved American Country and Her Worthy president. They Have proved Much to My Satisfaction—the More So as Besides the patriotic Affection Which Binds me to the United States I think the Exemple of...