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I have had the honor to receive your Letter of the 25. of August and Doctr Nicholl whose advice I have asked has been so obliging as to give me information respecting the manner in which the order of the Court of Chancery should be published—in a day or two I will procure its insertion in the proper news paper—some little attention will be requisite to avoid as far as practicable the great...
The Receipt of my dispatches will have apprized you of my arrival. For the moment I am engaged in the arrangements which the Settlement of my family require—as soon as I find a leisure moment I will prepare and send you the promised Supplement to my last dispatch, tho I really have nothing of importance to add. I do not recollect whether it has been the usage for our Ministers to proceed to...
Seven States only have been represented in congress since October, of consequence very few questions of national importance have been under the examination of this Assembly—the meetings of the Legislatures have probably detained many of the Delegates, but it is expected, that Ten States will, within a short period, be represented—there is some ground to expect that several of the Southern...
Lord Whitworth was ordered to leave Paris on the Evening of the 3d. instant, unless the French Government should have signed a Minute by which it should be agreed that the English should continue the Military possession of Malta for ten years; that the Island of Lampidusa should be ceded to them for ever; and that the French Forces should be withdrawn from Holland. On the morning of the 3rd....
M r. Hancock has accepted as President of congress and will be here in a few days; Seven States have been represented for a few days only since November commenced—Six States only are now represented, I inclose a list of their Names of the Delegates— A Bill passed the house of representatives of Massachusetts during their autumn Session, repealing all the Laws preventing the Return or Residence...
This day for the first our President Mr. Hancock took his Seat in convention, and we shall probably terminate our business on Saturday or Tuesday next. I cannot predict the issue, but our Hopes are increasing—if Mr. Hancock does not disappoint our present Expectations our wishes will be gratified. But his character is not entirely free from a portion of caprice—this however is confidential....
19 July 1802, London. No. 73. Reports receipt of 25 June letter from Commodore Morris at Gibraltar announcing Morocco’s “unexpected declaration of war” on U.S. Has notified U.S. consuls in Great Britain so that American ships might be forewarned. Does not know why “this unjust Proceeding has arisen,” having “no exact information either concerning the internal condition of Morocco, or of the...
Mr. Elliot, who, it has been said, was appointed, will not come to America; owing, say his friends here, to a disinclination on his part, that has arisen from the death of his eldest, or only son. Mr. Seaton yesterday read me an extract of a letter from London, dated Feb. 2. and written as he observed by a man of information, which says ‘Mr. Fraser is appointed Plenipotentiary to the U. S. of...
War seems more and more probable, indeed it appears to me inevitable: Holland will be involved, and Spain and Portugal must obey the commands of France. The day after the Kings Message to Parliament was communicated to the French Government, Bonaparte delivered to Lord Whitworth a paper (a copy of which I have seen) stating: 1. That the Expedition preparing in the Dutch Ports, was, as all the...
I left London the 18th. and sailed from Cowes the 21st. of last month—on the 16. the King sent a message to Parliament announcing the termination of the discussions with france, the Recall of the English ambassador from Paris, and that the french ambassador had left London; and calling upon Parliament to support “him in his determination to employ the Power and Resources of the Nation in...
In answer to your Letter of the 24 inst. I have the honour to state that no engagement was ever made by me that the long Bills of the Proctors shd. be paid. In consequence of an instruction that I gave to the agt. Mr Bayard to require that the proctors Bills shd. be regularly taxed, several of them came to me, to represent what they called the usage on this subject, and to urge me to...
15 May 1801, London. No. 17. Reports that Lord St. Helens has sailed for negotiations with Russians on the subject of a northern confederacy. Since French influence remains strong in St. Petersburg, believes British may have more difficulty than they expect. Conveys word of British victory in Egypt. Acknowledges receipt of 6 May letter from Dawson, then off Start Point. Dawson reached Le Havre...
You will undoubtedly hear much of the tumultuous and irregular conduct of a considerably numerous class of people in the western counties of massachusetts—the same temper which appears to have collected these illegal Assemblies in Massachusetts, has shewn itself in New Hampshire, but General Sullivan, who is now President of that State, by very proper and decisive Measures has put an End to...
28 March 1803, London. No. 88. “My No. 86. [19 Mar. 1803] communicated the tenour of Lord Hawkesbury’s Note of the 15. to the French Ambassador: the conclusion of the Note refers to the demand of France for the evacuation of Malta and declares ‘that the King cannot consent to its evacuation unless substantial security be provided for those objects which in present circumstances would be...
13 March 1802, London. No. 58. Reports there is no further information on the negotiations at Amiens since his last letter. In a “ free conversation ,” Addington “ yesterday told me that during the last Fortnight his mind had balanced whether to wish the conclusion or rupture of the negotiation ” but that the British were ready to sign a definitive treaty “provided it be done without any...
Care has been taken to put our friends at the eastward on their guard. Measures have been pursued to ascertain opinions in different quarters, and on this as on a former occasion, the object may be silently abandoned should it appear absolutely desperate. If Clinton should be supported this will be the case; if not the Party must resort to some other northern character, hence the Hopes of this...
30 July 1801, London. No. 28. Believes French invasion of Great Britain unlikely despite military preparations on both sides. Has heard nothing from Egypt. Reports that Sweden has agreed to British-Russian convention; expects Denmark soon to follow suit. Relays report that Tripoli declared war on U.S. 14 May. RC ( DNA : RG 59, DD , Great Britain, vol. 9). 2 pp.; in a clerk’s hand, signed by...
In the Paris papers of the 6th. instant is an article respecting the american negotiation, that seems to be drawn up with more care, and greater knowledge of the Subject, than is usual in a mere paragraph of the Editor’s—; and when considered in connexion with the present state of the french press, and the rumours of a like tenor, that have prevailed during the last weeks, leads to the belief...
28 February 1803, London. No. 82. Acknowledges JM’s letters of 16 and 23 Dec. 1802 . “By Lord Hawkesbury’s desire, I have conferred with Colo. Barclay respecting the continuation of the Boundary through the Bay of Passamaquoddy who has made no objection to the line we have proposed, tho’ he appears to think that it would be improper to cede to us the Island of Campo Bello unless the cession...
We may have 360 members in our Convention, not more than 330 have yet taken their Seats. Immediately after the settlement of Elections the Convention resolved that they would consider and freely deliberate on each paragraph without taking a [question on any of them individually,] & that on the question whether they wd. ratify, each [member] shd. be at liberty [to disc]uss the plan at large....
26 May 1802, London. No. 68. Reports anxiety among British manufacturers and merchants “founded upon the Belief that France would exclude, either wholly or in a very great degree,” British manufactures. “The prohibitory Laws of France passed during the War have been declared to be in force, and were it not for a recent and extraordinary Law which puts into the hands of the Chief Consul,...
9 February 1802, London. No. 52. States that the definitive treaty is not yet signed but preparations are being made to reduce the war establishment. Virtual annexation of Italian Republic by France will not impede peace with England, and neither Austria nor the rest of Italy has a voice at Amiens. The size of Great Britain’s peacetime establishment is unknown, but it will be larger than...
The convention proposed to have been held at Annapolis in the last month on the subject of commerce has terminated without credit, or prospect of having done much good— I inclose you the report which they addressed to their constituents—they were founded in the Opinion that an adjustment of the commercial powers of the several states is intimately connected with the other Authorities of the...
Mr. William R. Foster, son of a reputable Gentleman who is my near neighbour, and for whom, and for whose Family I take a particular Interest, is desirous to serve in the Navy. I have reason to think favorably of Mr. W. R. Foster’s Reputation; and can have no doubt, should he enter into the navy, that he will serve with credit to himself, and advantage of the Public. I have abstained from...
Herewith I enclose the Letter of the Comee. of the Senate, together with my answer to yr’s of the 4. Should it still be thought inexpedient to ratify the Convn. without farther Explanation I should think there would be no objection on the part of G. Br before the delivery of the Ratifications, to exchange with Mr Monroe a dec[larati]on that the Conn. was concluded without Reference to the...
I inclose a newspaper of yesterday containing the propositions communicated by Mr. Hancock to the Convention, on Thursday last. Mr. Adams who contrary to his own Sentiments has been hitherto silent in convention, has given his public & explicit approbation of Mr. Hancock’s propositions. We flatter ourselves that the weight of these two characters will insure our success, but the Event is not...
Letters are this moment received from Genl. Lincoln giving the pleasing intelligence that he dispersed the Party under Shays on the morning of the 5th. instant. The Insurgents had marched on the 4th from Pelham to Pitersham distant 30 miles, with about 1500 Men—Genl. Lincoln moved after them at Eight OClock on the same Evening and came on them by surprize at 9. OClock the next morning, They...
After further enquiry, I annex little credit to the notice posted at Loyds’, that two american vessels had been carried into Algiers. Two vessels the Franklin morris master, and the Rose (master not known) said to be of Philadelphia, are reported to have been taken by the cruisers of morocco or some other of the Barbary Powers. These are also the vessels which are mentioned at Loyds as having...
Extra[c]t of a Letter from a Gentleman in Boston of the 4th. March 1787. to R King— “—— has come back from Virginia with News that the Commissioners on the part of New York alarmed the Virginia Delegates, with an account that the Commissioners on the part of Massachusetts were for a monarchy ; & that those Delegates wrote their Legislature of it, who shut their Galaries and made a most serious...
20 June 1802, London. No. 70. Has received the duplicate of JM’s letter of 1 May ; as soon as the original arrives, will take “immediate measures to complete the Convention by exchanging the Ratifications.” The commission under article 7 is proceeding satisfactorily; more than fifty cases have been decided since it recommenced its business, and once the exchange of ratifications is made,...
4 October 1801, London. No. 37. Had expected to close negotiations on article 6 of the Jay treaty in time to forward result via Dawson, who is on the point of embarkation, but they are not yet concluded. Transmits instead a report of activities since his dispatch no. 32 [24 Aug.]. Will not agree to any variations on or enlargements of the [1783] treaty of peace as this would only “lay the...
Annexed I have the honour to send you a copy of my Correspondence with Mr. Anstey upon the Subject of the British Debts. Reference may be had to numbers 93 & 98. of the last series; the former inclosing Copy of a Paper delivered to Lord Grenville on the 23. of November 1800, as a commencement of the negotiation, and the latter explaining his Lordships reasons for devolving on Mr. Anstey the...
I have the honour to send you enclosed the copy of a convention which I have signed with Lord Hawkesbury concerning the 6. & 7. Arts. of the Treaty of 1794—As the discussions which led to this Result were begun and conducted under your instructions, I feel it to be my Duty, as well as a mark of Respect that is due to you, to send you this Copy by the same opportunity that I avail myself of, to...
10 June 1802, London. No. 69. Acknowledges JM’s public letter of 7 Apr. “communicating the Presidents approbation of the Convention respecting the 6 & 7 articles of the Treaty of 1794”; by “private accounts of a later date” has learned of the Senate’s consent. Has no news as to countervailing duties; “their continuance or repeal is a question submitted to the decision of Congress.” Does not...
Owing to my absence from NYK. I had not the honour of receiving yr letter of the 13. before yesterday. Although the suspended Items in my a/c are in my judgment equitable charges, yet as they seem not to be included within the List of contingent expenses heretofore allowed, I feel myself duly sensible of the Presidents liberality in the direction which he has authorised to be sent to the...
[ New York, March 24, 1791. “The Legislature of this State have incorporated the Bank, limiting its capital to a million of Dollars and its duration to twenty years . The Treasurer is authorised to subscribe to the Loan proposed to Congress all the Continental paper in the Treasury and by a bill that passed the Legislature this morning, he is directed to take in behalf of the State, one...
Our convention proceeds slowly. An apprehension that the liberties of the people are in danger, and a distrust of men of property or Education have a more powerful Effect upon the minds of our Opponents than any specific Objections against the constitution. If the Opposition was grounded on any precise Points, I am persuaded that it might be weakened if not entirely overcome. But every Attempt...
9 February 1803, London. No. 81. “As I apprehended might be the case, Bird Savage & Bird have answered my demand for the surrender of the Bills of Exchange lately remitted to them, by saying they were unable to deliver them up, as they had been discounted before their failure.” Has requested the firm to prepare and send him “their Accounts including all receipts and Payments up to the day on...
24 September 1801, London. No. 35. Acknowledges JM’s letters of 21 May , 15 and 30 June , and 24 , 27 , and 28 July , the last three conveyed by Erving. Contrary to his earlier report, Denmark has not agreed to the convention with St. Petersburg, but he assumes it will eventually do so in order to regain its possessions in the East and West Indies. Discusses the situation in Europe after the...
10 May 1803, London. No. 97. “Upon farther search several Trunks of Papers respecting West Florida have been discovered, and upon my application orders were immediately given to deliver them to me. I have annexed Copies of the application, and Answer, in order that the manner may appear in which these Documents came into our possession. “I am told by the Clerk who found them that there are...
M r. Alsop of this city, whom you must recollect as a delegate from this State to congress in 1775 & 1776, and whose daughter I have lately married, requests me to ask your Opinion, “whether a Refugee, whose Estate has been confiscated here, and to an amount exceeding that of his Debts, can by the British laws, or the Treaty of peace between G. Britain & the united States of america, be...
4 September 1801, London. No. 33. Reports that several American merchantmen have been seized off blockaded French coast despite Lord St. Vincent’s assurances that such vessels would be warned and turned away. Hopes to have these ships released soon. Expresses surprise that American merchants still continue to risk valuable ships and cargoes after long experience with the situation and their...
The question of Peace or War is still undecided; and as France plays for Time, and England (in which there is a public opinion) for a good Case to lay before the Nation, the negotiation may be spun out still longer; tho’ it continues to be said, as has been said for the last fortnight, that the next Messenger would enable the Ministry to bring it to a close. The objection of the British...
5 August 1802, London. Suggests that if the president consents to his return to the U.S., the same public ship could bring his successor and return King home. Realizes it is unlikely a frigate from the Mediterranean would be convenient, since “coming from that Quarter she might be liable to perform Quarantine which would occasion a long detention, as well as great Expense.” Requests to be...
23 December 1801, London. No. 45. Encloses copy of a letter from Lord Hawkesbury to Sir John Nicholl that has resulted in an order of restitution by the High Court of Admiralty in favor of all American vessels and cargoes detained on passage to Le Havre, except for the Frederick of New York and its cargo, the agents having brought that case to trial too soon. Conjectures the sentence may be...
14 August 1801, London. No. 29. Encloses copies of letter from John Turnbull of Turnbull, Forbes, & Company and the order in council referred to therein. Has sent Arrowsmith’s five-volume atlas; plans to forward Faden’s collection of maps and charts as soon as it is completed. RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 59, DD , Great Britain, vol. 9); letterbook copy and copies of enclosures ( NHi : Rufus...
From the month of May till September or October, including what is here called the long vacation, very little Business can be done in London; it being the custom of almost all official Characters to pass the summer in the Country, and to visit London as seldom as they can. I am not aware that anything very pressing will, in the course of the summer, especially if the Peace be definitively...
M r. Alsop of this city, whom you must recollect as a delegate from this State to congress in 1775 & 1776, and whose daughter I have lately married, requests me to ask your Opinion, whether a Refugee, whose Estate has been confiscated here, and to an amount exceeding that of his Debts, can by the British laws, or the Treaty of peace between G. Britain & the united States of america, be...
I have the satisfaction to inform you that on the final Question of assinting to & ratifying the constitution our convention divided, and 187. were in the affirmative & 168 in the negative: the majority although small is extremely respectable, and the minority are in good Temper; they have the magnanimity to declare that they will devote their Lives & property to support the Government, and I...
I have not been able to obtain the consent of the Sierra Leone Company to receive the Slaves which the State of Virginia might be willing to send to that settlement. My Correspondence on this Subject has been closed by a Letter from the Chairman Mr. Thornton which states that the Company are in Treaty with Government to receive the Colony under its exclusive control. The fact I understand to...