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As I know of no measure from abroad, which is capable of such extensive and injurious effects as the cession of Louisiana and the Floridas to France, it has been a subject of my unremitted solicitude and attention from the moment of our first suspicions concerning it. Its importance was fully and repeatedly developed to the Ministers of this Country before the conclusion of the Preliminaries,...
Buena parte has made the Debut of the campaigne by the easy tho important conquest of Malta. This Island has been supposed impregnable and therefore was the Depositary of great wealth removed there from Italy. It contained likewise an excellent arensal, two or three ships of the Line, and as many as 6.000 excellent Seamen. It was the maltese Seamen who made the fine campaign under Suffrein in...
I wrote to you two days ago by a private ship, as the Packet goes in a day or two I avail myself of the Opportunity to inform you that I have sent to the Secy of State my Resignation, and requested to be relieved in time to return home in April next. As there is reason to apprehend that we may be at war with all the barbary powers, as well as morocco I have asked for a Passage home in a...
The Letters which I have received from you are dated May 21. June 15. 30. July 23. 24. 27. 28. and Oct. 21. The principal Subjects to which they relate have already been taken notice of in the course of my Correspondence: the object of this Letter is to reply upon those miscellaneous Subjects which have hitherto been omitted. —St. Croix River Boundary.— I have taken occasion to explain to Lord...
In confirmation of the rumours of the day, Carnot’s answer to Bailleul, published during the Exile of the former, states the Project which had been discussed in the Directory to obtain from Spain a cession of Louisiana and the Floridas. A reference to that performance, copies of which I at the time sent to the Department of State, will shew the manner in which it was expected to obtain the...
Not finding Philadelphia notes to remit, I have directed Specie to be sent to you, by the messenger of the Branch, who sets out tomorrow. Will not the late change of affairs in Holland enable you to proceed with a loan? On every account, it would be truly advantageous, if you had a handsome Sum to invest at this Time. The Bank you are sensible are disposed to do all in their power, but...
Anticipating the rupture which may be regarded as having in effect taken place, I have sought and without difficulty found opportunities of conversing with those Members of the Cabinet who have the most influence in its decisions in order to impress upon them the very great importance, in the event of War, that the Instructions given to their Naval officers should be drawn up with plainness...
On the Evening of the Eleventh a Cutter arrived from Petersburgh, with a Copy of the Convention concluded on the 17th. ulto. between Lord St. Helens and Count Panin, by which the misunderstanding between England and Russia is amicably adjusted. The northern Confederacy, as you will recollect, aimed at the establishment of two Principles of Maritime Law: one that free Ships make free Goods; the...
I have nothing to add to my official letter respecting ⟨the⟩ negotiation relative to the 6th. article. The additional articles concerning Contraband and the impressment of Seamen were refered to Lord St. Vincent, who has informed me that he immediately reported upon them; he had before told me that he was in favour of their adoption; the Chancellor has assured me that he would attend to the...
Annexed I send you the copy of a letter which I have just received from Lord Hawkesbury on the subject of the Depredations upon our Trade in the West-Indies. As there can be no objection to it’s publication, you will perhaps think it advisable to have the Letter and it’s enclosures printed in our news papers, by which means it will reach the West-Indies, and be seen by those whose abuses it...
Although for the reason suggested (in my Official correspondence,) I have omitted to send you an account of what passed respecting the 6 & 7. Articles of the Treaty of 1794. subsequent to Mr. Dawson’s departure, I have on reflection thought it might be satisfactory, and perhaps useful, that I should in this way supply the omission. Lord Grenville, on being consulted by Lord Hawkesbury, having...
Since writing you a day or two past, I have had the pleasure to receive your Letter by the Packet, and am rejoiced to find my hopes confirmed by your Opinion that we shall not be wanting to ourselves in our Conduct towards France. Immediately on hearing of the proceedings of the Admiralty Judge of st. Domingo, I remonstrated to the Government against them, and was without delay answered that...
It has undoubtedly been said in England that the act of congress of the 15. of February relative to the federal Revenues, is full proof that the united States are in the utmost confusion, and that the Union is nearly dissolved— ignorant as the People of England still are of the Genius and Temper of the Citizens of America, it will not be extraordinary that such Opinions should be fondly...
Commodore Dale while at Toulon having informed me that he might have occasion to draw upon Messrs. Mackenzie and Glennie for more than the amount of the Funds in their hands subject to his Draughts, I communicated the same to these Gentlemen, who have assured me that the Commodore’s Bills shall be duly honoured. The arms which have been making by Mortimer for the Bey of Tunis are completed;...
I have received your letter of the 22. of august with an inclosure that has been delivered as directed. On that subject, things are here, as we could desire: there will be precisely such a cooperation as we wish, the moment we are ready. The Secretary of State will shew you my communications on this Subject, tho’ I have not a word from him respecting it; your outline corresponds with what had...
Mr. Jay will be with you this week —you will therefore have an opportunity to converse with him respecting our very unpleasant situation. All the measures which have been pursued have been calculated to induce the Legislature to call a convention to revise the decision of the canvassers. So far as I am able to form an Opinion, a majority of the Assembly are Clintonians, and if so, will not...
It has undoubtedly been said in England that the act of congress of the 15. of February relative to the federal Revenues, is full proof that the united States are in the utmost confusion, and that the Union is nearly dissolved—ignorant as the People of England still are of the Genius and Temper of the Citizens of America, it will not be extraordinary that such Opinions should be fondly...
On the 28 ulto. the Bank of England stopped payment in Specie. And since every Bank in Great Britain has followed the Example; the Directors say the Bank is more than Solvent, exclusive of their capital Stock invested in the Funds. Committees of the two House of Parliament, which have examined the affairs of the Bank, confirm by their Report the Declaration of the Directors, and Associations...
Since the removal of the Negotiation to Paris, I am less able to send you early and exact information of its progress. It is understood that according to the Instructions sent to Lord Whitworth on the 3rd. instant, his Lordship concluded his Conferences, as well with Mr. Talleyrand as with the First Consul, by declaring that a refusal of the satisfaction he was ordered to demand would be...
The Arch Duke having expelled Jourdan & Moreau from Germany the Parties are in respect to territory in this Quarter where they were when the campaign began. Buonaparte by the latest accounts from Italy is critically circumstanced, and it seems not improbable that he likewise will be compelled to retire from Lombardy. The mission of Lord Malmesbury remains undecided, and though the negotiation...
I had the honor to write to you under date of the second of November, at which time the congress of the last year was at the point of seperation to make way for their successors— states sufficient to form a new Congress did not assemble until the 23 d. ult, when they proceeded to the choice of a President, and M r. Hancock, although absent, was elected— whether he will accept the Appointment...
In a Letter dated October 7. Commodore Dale informs me that he had been obliged to ask the English Government at Gibraltar for certain Supplies that his Squadron stood in need of; a List of the Articles and of their prices is contained in the Commodores Receipts, copies of which were enclosed in his Letter to me. I have hitherto received no application for payment, and am in hopes that such...
As Mr. Church is the bearer, I refer you to him for what it would take many Pages to relate, and will only say that notwithstanding the injuries we continue to receive from France I still hope, the same policy that has hitherto kept us out of the war, will continue to influence and decide our Government. How the new President will conduct himself in a situation thorny and embarrassing remains...
2 April 1803, London. No. 89. Reports that no answer has yet been given to Andréossy’s note, which declined all discussion of Malta. “Lord Hawkesbury’s Answer will probably be delivered to day; it will without doubt persist in the Determination communicated in his first Note, and may disclose new and additional reasons in its support.” The issue of an overture Napoleon reportedly made to...
Mr Gore having during my absence acknowledged the receipt of your letter to me, and at the same time transmitted to you copies of the correspondence with the President of the Sierra Leone Company, I have only to resume the subject where he left it— The idle and disorderly Character of the Negroes who deserted their masters and joined the Br: army in america , and who constitute the greater...
Mad: agrees wth. Wilson in his difinition of executive powers—executive powers ex vi termini, do not include the Rights of war & peace &c. but the powers shd. be confined and defined—if large we shall have the Evils of elective Monarchies—probably the best plan will be a single Executive of long duration wth. a Council, with liberty to depart from their Opinion at his peril— Farrand, Records...
This speech preceded Wilson’s motion, seconded by JM, to combine the judiciary with the executive in vetoing legislative acts. Mad. The Judicial ought to be introduced in the business of Legislation—they will protect their Department, and uniting wh. the Executive render their Check or negative more respectable—there is weight in the objections agt. this measure—but a Check is necessary...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 9, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for a few words inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXX” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
We have the honor of addressing this by our worthy friend, the honorable Mr. Sayre, who was formerly Sheriff of London. The active part, which at the commencement of the revolution, he took in favor of America, is, we presume, too well known to you, to require a relation: and the loss he sustained, in consequence of his opposition to the british ministry, is not less a matter of general...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 14, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for several words and phrases inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXIII” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald, A Gazette for the Country , December 23, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for some words and phrases and one full paragraph inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXXIV” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 26, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for some phrases, sentences, and two paragraphs inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXXV” is in the handwriting of Rufus King. On the...
It will be useful, as it will simplify the Examination of the commercial articles of the Treaty, to bear in mind and preserve the Division that we find established by the 12. 13. & the 14. & 15. articles. Each respects a particular Branch or portion of the trade between the two Countries, the regulations whereof, differ from, and are severally independent of each other. Thus one is relative to...
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney moved that the members of the first branch of the legislature “‘instead of being elected by the people, shd. be elected in such manner as the Legislature of each State should direct’” ( Farrand, Records Max Farrand, ed., The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787 (4 vols.; New Haven, 1911–37). , I, 358). Agt. the Election by the Legislatures and in favor of one...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 2, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for a few phrases and sentences inserted by H, the draft of this essay is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 5, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for minor changes in wording made by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXIX” is in the handwriting of Rufus King. On a page attached to the...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 14, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for several words and phrases and one paragraph inserted by H, the draft of this essay is in the handwriting of Rufus King. The paragraph...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 25, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for several words, phrases, and footnotes inserted by H, the draft of this essay is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 28, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for a few phrases and sentences inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXVII” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.