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Averse to any connexion with the war beyound what may be permitted by the laws of strict neutrality, we are pleased to see the Proclamation. I have no precedents with which to compare it, but I could have wished to have seen in some part of it the word “Neutrality,” which every one would have understood and felt the force of. Having anxiously considered the point respecting which we conversed...
Not finding Philadelphia notes to remit, I have directed Specie to be sent to you, by the messenger of the Branch, who sets out tomorrow. Will not the late change of affairs in Holland enable you to proceed with a loan? On every account, it would be truly advantageous, if you had a handsome Sum to invest at this Time. The Bank you are sensible are disposed to do all in their power, but...
[ New York, June 14, 1793. On June 15, 1793, Hamilton wrote to King : “The ideas expressed in your letter of the 14th correspond with my view of the subject.” Letter not found. ]
The french fleet from the Chesapeak arrived here yesterday, and are in the north river above the Battery. The Ambuscade also arrived last Evening and her accounts, confirmed by those of many Spectators of the combat, have no doubt of the Flight of the English Frigate. (You will have seen in our news papers, an invitation for a meeting in the Fields to address Mr. Genest who is daily expected...
[ New York, August 10, 1793. On August 13, 1793, Hamilton wrote to King : “The Post of to day brought me your letter of the 10th.” Letter not found. ]
You will recieve herewith enclosed a Publication by Mr Genet denying his having declared that he wd. appeal from the President to the People —a publication by us that we would shortly proceed to state the Evidence and Circumstances relative to that Transaction, and also our manuscript address to the public containing such Statemt. We think it more expedient as well as more delicate with...
About a Fortnight since I wrote to you intimating the probability that Mr. Jay & I should call on you and General Knox on the subject of Mr Genets Declaration that he would appeal from the President to the people. A letter of this date from Mr. Jay & me will inform you & the General of the present posture of this Business—you will perceive that the Statement that we have concluded to publish,...
Letter not found: from John Jay and Rufus King, 27 Jan. 1794. In his letter to Henry Knox of 15 Feb. , GW referred to “the subject of Mr Jay and Mr King’s letter to me, of the 27th of last month.”
The amendment reported by the committee of the Senate to the Bill relative to the Balances due to the Creditor States is in itself so important, and particularly so interesting to the State of New york, that I feel great reluctance to be absent while the same is under Discussion; but a sudden indisposition in my family compels me to return to Newyork, I hope to be again in my Place on Monday...
[ Philadelphia, June 10, 1795. On June 11, 1795, Hamilton wrote to King : “I thank you for your letter of the 10th.” Letter not found. ]
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 14, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for several words and phrases inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXIII” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 14, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for several words and phrases and one paragraph inserted by H, the draft of this essay is in the handwriting of Rufus King. The paragraph...
It will be useful, as it will simplify the Examination of the commercial articles of the Treaty, to bear in mind and preserve the Division that we find established by the 12. 13. & the 14. & 15. articles. Each respects a particular Branch or portion of the trade between the two Countries, the regulations whereof, differ from, and are severally independent of each other. Thus one is relative to...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 25, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for several words, phrases, and footnotes inserted by H, the draft of this essay is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , November 28, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for a few phrases and sentences inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXVII” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 2, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for a few phrases and sentences inserted by H, the draft of this essay is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 5, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for minor changes in wording made by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXIX” is in the handwriting of Rufus King. On a page attached to the...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 9, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for a few words inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXX” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
I send you Dunlap of this Morning, in it you have the foreign intelligence. Fenno Dunlap & others have erroneously stated that Mr Warder brought the Ratification of Great Britain—no official Dispatch has been received. Rutledge was negatived yesterday by the Senate. From present appearances the address to the President by the House will pass without a Debate. The Draft has been by agreement in...
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald, A Gazette for the Country , December 23, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for some words and phrases and one full paragraph inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXXIV” is in the handwriting of Rufus King.
ADf , in the handwriting of Rufus King, Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; The [New York] Herald; A Gazette for the Country , December 26, 1795. For background to this document, see the introductory note to “The Defence No. I,” July 22, 1795 . Except for some phrases, sentences, and two paragraphs inserted by H, the draft of “The Defence No. XXXV” is in the handwriting of Rufus King. On the...
[ Philadelphia, April 1, 1796. On April 2, 1796, Hamilton wrote to King : “Thank you for yours of yesteday.” Letter not found. ]
In general I agree in the Course you recommend. Separate Bills will be reported to the House this morning, providing for the Sp. Ind. & Alg. Treaties—they will pass the H. and be sent to the Senate by the middle of the week. I percive no impropriety in adding to the first of these Bills recived by the Senate, and in succession to each of them if requisite, a Provision for the Br. Treaty. Such...
The Petitions of the Merchants and others will be printed today, and it is said they have been signed by almost every Merchant & Trader in the City —Pettit, Barclay, & some few others are exceptions. A counter Petition has been very industriously carried through the City and its Suburbs; and though very few merchants, Traders, or principal mechanicks have signed it, it will shew a long...
In committee of the whole on friday it was resolved by the casting vote of Muhlenburgh the chairman, to make provision by Law for carrying the Treaty with England into Effect. Yesterday the Resolution of the Committee of the whole was passed in the House by 51. against 48. A proposition to prefix to the Resolution a Preamble declaring the Treaty to be injurious to the Interest of the US. and...
The inclosed letter will give you all the information that we have on the Subject to wh. it relates. It seems problematical whether PH. can be induced to agree in the arrangement —some circumstances of which I have lately heard incline me to believe that he will not. Our session will close by the first of June provided no farther impediment is thrown in the way of the Provision for giving...
[ London, August 6, 1796. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from … Mr. King” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
It would have been agreeable to this Government if we would have agreed to the appointment of Doct. Swabey as the fifth commissioner; he is really a very candid and honorable man, but for the same reason that we could not satisfy the Commissioners on the part of G.B. with the appointment of our Country man Colo Trumbull, an equally candid and honorable character, they have been unable to...
I received this morning a Letter from Mr. Monroe dated Paris August 28. of which the following is an extract—“As soon as the order of this Government , as notified by the minister of foreign Affairs to Barthelemi the present Ambassador at Basle appeared in the Papers, for it was never notified to the foreign ministers here, I applied for information whether orders were issued for the Seizure...
Immediately after the publication of the Letter from the french Government to their Minister Barthelemi at Basle, announcing their determination to seize the cargoes of neutral vessels destined to the English Ports, I wrote to Mr. Monroe informing him that the Br. Gov. disavowed the having issued any recent order for the capture of neutral Cargoes bound to french Ports as alledged in the...
I have had the honor to receive your Letter of the 25. of August and Doctr Nicholl whose advice I have asked has been so obliging as to give me information respecting the manner in which the order of the Court of Chancery should be published—in a day or two I will procure its insertion in the proper news paper—some little attention will be requisite to avoid as far as practicable the great...
The Arch Duke having expelled Jourdan & Moreau from Germany the Parties are in respect to territory in this Quarter where they were when the campaign began. Buonaparte by the latest accounts from Italy is critically circumstanced, and it seems not improbable that he likewise will be compelled to retire from Lombardy. The mission of Lord Malmesbury remains undecided, and though the negotiation...
I have the Honor to inclose a copy of the Gazette, containing a Publication of the Chancery Order, you sent me for that Purpose. I shall forward other Copies by future Opportunities, And have the Honor to be, with perfect Respect & Esteem Sir Yr ob. & faithful Serv. PHi .
[ London, February 4, 1797. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
I have had the pleasure to receive your Letter of the 16. of Decr. and I need not express the Satisfaction which the information that it contained afforded me, the Probable termination of the Election of Pr. the general Temper of the Country, & the Effect likely to be produced by Mr. Adet’s notes are such as I had not only hoped but expected; if by prudence & Firmness, which have hitherto kept...
I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 22d of december. Count Rumford being in Bavaria. I have requested the minister of that Country at this court, to forward your Letter to the count with his next dispatch—I have delivered to Mr Fulton the letter for him, and as soon as Sir John Sinclair returns to Town I will also deliver the Letter addressed to him—I have before sent two copies...
On the 28 ulto. the Bank of England stopped payment in Specie. And since every Bank in Great Britain has followed the Example; the Directors say the Bank is more than Solvent, exclusive of their capital Stock invested in the Funds. Committees of the two House of Parliament, which have examined the affairs of the Bank, confirm by their Report the Declaration of the Directors, and Associations...
As Mr. Church is the bearer, I refer you to him for what it would take many Pages to relate, and will only say that notwithstanding the injuries we continue to receive from France I still hope, the same policy that has hitherto kept us out of the war, will continue to influence and decide our Government. How the new President will conduct himself in a situation thorny and embarrassing remains...
As I forward several copies of the news Paper that contained the advertisement concerning your suit in the Chancery of Virginia, though a Ship in which one of them was sent, has been carried into France I hope some others arrived safe and in Season —Every one is anxious to hear from Vienna, the latest accounts from which, leaving it uncertain whether we are to expect the news of a Great...
Unless greater attention is given to the procuring of the requisite evidence in the Cases of Capture than has yet been done, we shall ultimately meet with serious Losses, and give occasion to much Complaint. The Sufferers depend on the Government, and the Government on the Sufferers, and thus that wh. shd. be done is omitted. I inclose to you a copy of notes wh. Mr. Gore & I made this morning...
Lord Malmesbury will leave London in three or four Days for Lille where the conferences between this Country and France are to be held. Opinions fluctuate concerning the Probability of peace. A Struggle evidently exists in France between the Directory & the Legislature, in the latter of which Bodies it is supposed there is a sincere desire of Peace. Some late proceedings in the Legislature, or...
No satisfactory Opinion can yet be formed concerning the termination of the negotiations for Peace. Even those who are supposed to have the best information are without confidence—on the one Hand peace may be concluded sooner than any one thinks probable, on the other the negotiations at Lisle and montebello may be suddenly broken off, and France again engaged with austria as well as England....
I have requested Capt. Newel of the Ship Cleopatra, who is bound to Philadelphia to take charge of a Diploma delivered to me for you by Sir John Sinclair, President of the Board of Agriculture. I have just received from Mr. Strickland a letter for you; but as he informs me that the letter is to accompany a small box, containing an assortment of seeds which is also to be sent to my care, but...
I have had the honor to receive your Letter of the 15 of June; and having a few minutes before the Mail for New York is dispatched, I employ them in sending you inclosed the copy of a Letter that I received a few days past from our Consul at Hamburgh, which announces the approaching release of General La Fayette. Knowing the friendship that you have uniformly had for him, and recollecting...
We have this day accounts from Paris, which tho~ very important and interesting, are not unexpected. The Breach between the Councils and the directory has for some time destroyed all Prospect of a reconciliation between them; and either an organized civil war, in consequence of the different sides adopted by the several armies, or a Measure like that which has happened, had become...
I have had the honor to receive your Letter of the 31st of July, and according to your request, have procured, and now send inclosed the Affidavit of Mr Harrison the Publisher of the London Gazette, that the Chancery Order which you some months since sent to me for that purpose had been published in that News Paper for nine weeks successively. With the most perfect Respect and Esteem, I have...
[ London, November 13, 1797. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c. dates & persons from 1796 to Augt. 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.
I had the Honor today to receive your Letter concerning young la fayette, who arrived at Calais about three weeks since—this I have learnt from an american who saw him there. As it was well known in France that his father & family are in Holstein, I presume that the young man must have left France, and gone to his family—I understand that General La fayette intends imbarking for america Early...
It will not surprise you to hear that an open Scism, accompanied by mutual reproaches took place between our Envoys before they separated. Mr. Gerry remains at Paris; and there is a strong opinion that great pains will be taken to persuade him to consent to a public reception, in order to deceive and mock his Country with overtures of an insidious negociation. Marshall & Pinckney left Paris...
[ London, May 26, 1798. King’s notation for this letter reads: “Hamilton. Politicks.” Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Rufus King’s “Memorandum of Private Letters, &c., dates & persons, from 1796 to Augt 1802,” owned by Mr. James G. King, New York City.