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Our convention this day ratified the constitution 187 affirmatives 168 negatives the majority although small are very respectable, and the minority in addition to great Temper & moderation, publickly declare that the Discussion has been fair & candid, and that the majority having decided in favor of the constitution, they will devote their Lives & Fortunes to support the Government—with...
Our prospects are gloomy, but hope is not entirely extinguished. Gerry has not returned to the Convention, & I think will not again be invited. We are now thinking of amendments to be submitted not as a condition of our assent & Ratification; but as the opinion of the Convention subjoined to their Ratification. This scheme may gain a few members, but the issue is doubtful. Farewel RC ( DLC );...
I have made an arrangement to forward by express the result of the convention of New Hampshire to Springfield in this State, from which place Genl. Knox has engaged a conveyance to you at Poughkeepsie. Those who are best informed of the situation of the Question in New Hampshire are positive that the Decision will be such as we wish, and from the particular Facts which I have heard, I can...
Seven States only have been represented in congress since October, of consequence very few questions of national importance have been under the examination of this Assembly—the meetings of the Legislatures have probably detained many of the Delegates, but it is expected, that Ten States will, within a short period, be represented—there is some ground to expect that several of the Southern...
M r. Hancock has accepted as President of congress and will be here in a few days; Seven States have been represented for a few days only since November commenced—Six States only are now represented, I inclose a list of their Names of the Delegates— A Bill passed the house of representatives of Massachusetts during their autumn Session, repealing all the Laws preventing the Return or Residence...
This day for the first our President Mr. Hancock took his Seat in convention, and we shall probably terminate our business on Saturday or Tuesday next. I cannot predict the issue, but our Hopes are increasing—if Mr. Hancock does not disappoint our present Expectations our wishes will be gratified. But his character is not entirely free from a portion of caprice—this however is confidential....
You will undoubtedly hear much of the tumultuous and irregular conduct of a considerably numerous class of people in the western counties of massachusetts—the same temper which appears to have collected these illegal Assemblies in Massachusetts, has shewn itself in New Hampshire, but General Sullivan, who is now President of that State, by very proper and decisive Measures has put an End to...
We may have 360 members in our Convention, not more than 330 have yet taken their Seats. Immediately after the settlement of Elections the Convention resolved that they would consider and freely deliberate on each paragraph without taking a [question on any of them individually,] & that on the question whether they wd. ratify, each [member] shd. be at liberty [to disc]uss the plan at large....
The convention proposed to have been held at Annapolis in the last month on the subject of commerce has terminated without credit, or prospect of having done much good— I inclose you the report which they addressed to their constituents—they were founded in the Opinion that an adjustment of the commercial powers of the several states is intimately connected with the other Authorities of the...
I inclose a newspaper of yesterday containing the propositions communicated by Mr. Hancock to the Convention, on Thursday last. Mr. Adams who contrary to his own Sentiments has been hitherto silent in convention, has given his public & explicit approbation of Mr. Hancock’s propositions. We flatter ourselves that the weight of these two characters will insure our success, but the Event is not...
Letters are this moment received from Genl. Lincoln giving the pleasing intelligence that he dispersed the Party under Shays on the morning of the 5th. instant. The Insurgents had marched on the 4th from Pelham to Pitersham distant 30 miles, with about 1500 Men—Genl. Lincoln moved after them at Eight OClock on the same Evening and came on them by surprize at 9. OClock the next morning, They...
Extra[c]t of a Letter from a Gentleman in Boston of the 4th. March 1787. to R King— “—— has come back from Virginia with News that the Commissioners on the part of New York alarmed the Virginia Delegates, with an account that the Commissioners on the part of Massachusetts were for a monarchy ; & that those Delegates wrote their Legislature of it, who shut their Galaries and made a most serious...
Our convention proceeds slowly. An apprehension that the liberties of the people are in danger, and a distrust of men of property or Education have a more powerful Effect upon the minds of our Opponents than any specific Objections against the constitution. If the Opposition was grounded on any precise Points, I am persuaded that it might be weakened if not entirely overcome. But every Attempt...
M r. Alsop of this city, whom you must recollect as a delegate from this State to congress in 1775 & 1776, and whose daughter I have lately married, requests me to ask your Opinion, “whether a Refugee, whose Estate has been confiscated here, and to an amount exceeding that of his Debts, can by the British laws, or the Treaty of peace between G. Britain & the united States of america, be...
M r. Alsop of this city, whom you must recollect as a delegate from this State to congress in 1775 & 1776, and whose daughter I have lately married, requests me to ask your Opinion, whether a Refugee, whose Estate has been confiscated here, and to an amount exceeding that of his Debts, can by the British laws, or the Treaty of peace between G. Britain & the united States of america, be...
I have the satisfaction to inform you that on the final Question of assinting to & ratifying the constitution our convention divided, and 187. were in the affirmative & 168 in the negative: the majority although small is extremely respectable, and the minority are in good Temper; they have the magnanimity to declare that they will devote their Lives & property to support the Government, and I...
I leave this city Tomorrow for Boston, and shall be extremely obliged to you to inform me of the Progress and determination of your Convention—you can with difficulty conceive the real anxiety experienced in Massachusetts concerning your Decision—there remains no doubt that a very large majority of the People of Mass: are in favor of the federal constitution. The late Elections for Governor...
I beg leave to recommend to your good offices, and friendly protection, the bearer Mrs. Mercer of this city, the widow of the late Mr. Richard Mercer Purveyor General of the Suthern Hopital of the United States. Mr. Mercer was formerly a respectable merchant in Charleston, South Carolina; and in addition to very considerable losses, which he sustained by the war his family suffered the severe...
M r. Hancock has accepted as President of Congress and will be here in a few days; Seven States have been represented for a few days only since November commenced— Six states only are now represented, I inclose a list of the Names of the Delegates— A Bill passed the house of representatives of massachusetts during their autumn Session, repealing all the Laws preventing the Return or Residence...
I most sincerely congratulate you on the decision of your convention, and am pleased to hear from your Colleague Mr. Brown that by this Time you have returned to New York. I am greatly indebted to you for the frequent information of the progress of your Convention, and should before now have made you my acknowledgements, had I not supposed that you was on your way to Congress, and that Letters...
I hope your information will be confirmed; that the Tide is again turning in favor of the Constitution in Virginia. We make but slow progress in our Convention, the Friends of the Constitution who in addition to their own weight, are respectable as they represent a very large proportion of the Good Sense and Property of this State, have the Task not only of answering, but also of stating and...
By Capt. Boudinot who sailed in January, I wrote to Col. Smith informing him particularly of the situation of our public Affairs—Since that Time Congress has been organized and General St. Clair of Pennsylvania placed in the seat of the President. Nine States have not yet been represented, and of Consequence few measures of importance have even been debated in this Assembly—your communications...
I intended to have written to you previously to my departure from New York—Mr. Jay has undoubtedly transmitted to you the late acts of Congress permitting your return to america after the expiration of your Commission to the English Court, and giving you the unequivocal thanks of the U.S. for the diligent, faithful, and able discharge of your various public duties since our residence in...
M r. Wingrove who some months since arrived here from England with a recommendation from you to M r. Jay, submitted to congress a plan for an american commercial establishment in the East Indies—the project was referred to a committee of congress, who were of Opinion that the commercial intercourse between the United States and India would be more prosperous if left unfettered in the hands of...
You will undoubtedly hear much of the tumultuous and irregular conduct of a considerably numerous class of people in the western counties of massachusetts— the same temper which appears to have collected these illegal Assemblies in Massachusetts, has shewn itself in New Hampshire; but General Sullivan, who is now President of that State, by very proper and decisive Measures has put an End to...
By the January Packet I was honored with your letter of the 23. of December, and by M r. Anstey who arrived in the February Packet, I received your’s of the 22. of January: I pray you to accept my acknowledgments for these Kind attentions, and to be assured that if any communications in my power concerning our common country, will afford you any information, the pleasure of transmitting them,...
By the January Packet I was honored with your letter of the 23. of December, and by M r. Ansley who arrived in the February Packet. I received your’s of the 22. of January. I pray you to accept my acknowledgments for these Kind attentions, and to be assured that if any communications in my power concerning our common country, will afford you any information, the pleasure of transmitting them,...
I do myself the Honor of introducing to your civilities Doctor Provost, Chaplain to Congress and Rector of the Episcopal Church in this City—the Doctor goes to England for consecration as a Bishop. His very amiable private character, his exemplary conduct in his profession, & his firm attachment to the Freedom & Happiness of mankind, have very justly endeared him to his friends, & Countrymen—...
I send you a copy of the confederation between the New England Colonies, together with a few Extracts from the Journals of the Commissioners. As I hope to leave Town on Tuesday for Boston, I pray you to return me these papers Sometime Tomorrow. You are sensible that information from the southern States relative to the proposed Constitution will be of importance to us at Boston while engaged on...
Seven States only have been represented in congress since October, of consequence very few questions of national importance have been under the examination of this Assembly— The meetings of the Legislatures have probably detained many of the Delegates, but it is expected, that Ten States will, within a short period, be represented—There is some ground to expect that several of the Southern...
Federal is an association of distinct Govt: into one—these fed. Govt. in some instances legislate on collective bodies, in others on individuals. The Confederation partakes of both—Piracies are cognizable by the Congress—&c. Our powers have this object—the Freedom & Happiness of our Country—we must go all lengths to accomplish this Object—if the Legislatures have no powers to ratify because...
I had the honor to write to you under date of the second of November, at which time the congress of the last year was at the point of seperation to make way for their successors—states sufficient to form a new Congress did not assemble until the 23 d. ult. when they proceeded to the choice of a President, and M r Hancock, although absent, was elected—whether he will accept the Appointment is...
A confidential intimacy with our common friend M r. Gerry, with whom I have served during the last year has given me full information of the correspondence which has lately passed between you and him: and it is in consequence of a Sentence in your last letter to M r. Gerry, that I take the Liberty of addressing this to you— if M r. Gerry remained in Congress, I should suppose that the...
It has undoubtedly been said in England that the act of congress of the 15. of February relative to the federal Revenues, is full proof that the united States are in the utmost confusion, and that the Union is nearly dissolved— ignorant as the People of England still are of the Genius and Temper of the Citizens of America, it will not be extraordinary that such Opinions should be fondly...
It has undoubtedly been said in England that the act of congress of the 15. of February relative to the federal Revenues, is full proof that the united States are in the utmost confusion, and that the Union is nearly dissolved—ignorant as the People of England still are of the Genius and Temper of the Citizens of America, it will not be extraordinary that such Opinions should be fondly...
I had the honor to write to you under date of the second of November, at which time the congress of the last year was at the point of seperation to make way for their successors— states sufficient to form a new Congress did not assemble until the 23 d. ult, when they proceeded to the choice of a President, and M r. Hancock, although absent, was elected— whether he will accept the Appointment...
Mad: agrees wth. Wilson in his difinition of executive powers—executive powers ex vi termini, do not include the Rights of war & peace &c. but the powers shd. be confined and defined—if large we shall have the Evils of elective Monarchies—probably the best plan will be a single Executive of long duration wth. a Council, with liberty to depart from their Opinion at his peril— Farrand, Records...
This speech preceded Wilson’s motion, seconded by JM, to combine the judiciary with the executive in vetoing legislative acts. Mad. The Judicial ought to be introduced in the business of Legislation—they will protect their Department, and uniting wh. the Executive render their Check or negative more respectable—there is weight in the objections agt. this measure—but a Check is necessary...
We have the honor of addressing this by our worthy friend, the honorable Mr. Sayre, who was formerly Sheriff of London. The active part, which at the commencement of the revolution, he took in favor of America, is, we presume, too well known to you, to require a relation: and the loss he sustained, in consequence of his opposition to the british ministry, is not less a matter of general...
Charles Cotesworth Pinckney moved that the members of the first branch of the legislature “‘instead of being elected by the people, shd. be elected in such manner as the Legislature of each State should direct’” ( Farrand, Records Max Farrand, ed., The Records of the Federal Convention of 1787 (4 vols.; New Haven, 1911–37). , I, 358). Agt. the Election by the Legislatures and in favor of one...