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I was at Colo. Peter Randolph ’s about a Fortnight ago, and my Schooling falling into Discourse, he said he thought it would be to my Advantage to go to the College, and was desirous I should go, as indeed I am myself for several Reasons. In the first place as long as I stay at the Mountain the Loss of one fourth of my Time is inevitable, by Company’s coming here and detaining me from School....
This very day, to others the day of greatest mirth and jollity, sees me overwhelmed with more and greater misfortunes than have befallen a descendant of Adam for these thousand years past I am sure; and perhaps, after excepting Job, since the creation of the world. I think his misfortunes were somewhat greater than mine: for although we may be pretty nearly on a level in other respects, yet I...
I have been thinking this half hour how to begin my letter and cannot for my soul make it out. I wish to the Lord one could write a letter without any beginning for I am sure it allways puzzles me more than all the rest of it. And to tell you the plain truth I have not a syllable to write to you about. For I do not conceive that any thing can happen in my world which you would give a curse to...
Your’s of May 30’th came safe to hand. The rival you mentioned I know not whether to think formidable or not as there has been so great an opening for him during my absence. I say ‘has been’ because I expect there is one no longer since you have undertaken to act as my attorney. You advise me to ‘go immediately and lay siege in form.’ You certainly did not think at the time you wrote this of...
From a croud of disagreeable [companions] among whom I have spent three or four of the most tedious hours of my life, I retire into Gunn’s bedchamber to converse in black and white with an absent friend. I heartily wish you were here that I might converse with a Christian once more before I die: for die I must this night unless I should be releived by the arrival of some sociable fellow. But I...
In the most melancholy fit that ever any poor soul was, I sit down to write to you. Last night, as merry as agreeable company and dancing with Belinda in the Apollo could make me, I never could have thought the succeeding sun would have seen me so wretched as I now am! I was prepared to say a great deal: I had dressed up in my own mind, such thoughts as occurred to me, in as moving language as...
The contents of your letter have not a little alarmed me: and really upon seriously weighing them with what has formerly passed between αδνιλεβ and myself I am somewhat at a loss what to conclude. Your ‘semper saltat, semper ridet, semper loquitur, semper solicitat’ &c. appear a little suspicious, but good god! it is impossible! I told you our confab in the Apollo: but I beleive I never told...
I received your letter of Wednesday the 18th instant; in that, of this day, you mention one which you wrote last Friday, and sent by the Secretary ’s boy; but I have neither seen nor heard of such a one. God send, mine of Jan. 19 to you may not have shared the same fate; for, by your letter, I am uncertain whether you have received it or not; you therein say, ‘you hope to have received an...
As the messenger who delivered me your letter, informs me that your boy is to leave town tomorrow morning I will endeavor to answer it as circumstantially as the hour of the night, and a violent head ach , with which I have been afflicted these two days, will permit. With regard to the scheme which I proposed to you some time since, I am sorry to tell you it is totally frustrated by Miss R....
This letter will be conveied to you by the assistance of our friend Warner Lewis. Poor fellow! never did I see one more sincerely captivated in my life. He walked to the Indian camp with her yesterday, by which means he had an opportunity of giving her two or three love squeezes by the hand, and like a true Arcadian swain, has been so enraptured ever since that he is company for no one. Betsy...
I like your proposal of keeping up an epistolary correspondence on subjects of some importance. I do not at present recollect any difficult question in natural philosophy, but shall be glad to have your opinion on a subject much more interesting. What that is I will tell you. In perusing a magazine some time ago I met with an account of a person who had been drowned. He had continued under...
I received your last by T. Nelson whom I luckily met on my road hither. Surely never did small hero experience greater misadventures than I did on the first two or three days of my travelling. Twice did my horse run away with me and greatly endanger the breaking my neck on the first day. On the second I drove two hours through as copious a rain as ever I have seen, without meeting with a...
I am at length arrived here, after a long, but agreeable trip along the continent as far as New York; which however was less agreeable for want of a companion, whose equal curiosity might have kept one in countenance in rambling over the different places which lie on the road. This I expected from you, and wrote to you upon that subject early in the spring; and nothing could equal my vexation...
14Memorandum Books, 1767 (Jefferson Papers)
Aug. 25. survey forfeited sold it to Edward Pharr for 37 lib. 10/ cash and gave him a deed &c. Payne after this expr essed sad ness at losing his mill but said he had rather it should be in his h ands? than any other’s. On which Pharr told him? if he would make up his money in a twelve month he would return the land. He agreed with Payne to keep the mill: Payne left the mill as there was no...
Your welfare, That of m’rs Page, and your heir apparent give me great joy: but much was I disappointed at not seeing you here today. surely you will visit the city some time in the co urt: do not let family attachments totally rusticate you. in answer to the interrogatories of your letter , I left my wife and family well; I have been in constant health myself and still continue . I left well,...
16Memorandum Books, 1768 (Jefferson Papers)
Jan. 7. Inclosed writ in Christian v. Patteson to sheriff of Buckingham. 13. Samson v. Wm. Winston. The trial was in April 1758 (or within a court or two of it). Search S. O. for Kimbro’s depon. 14. Thompson v. Robertson. The def. is dead. Wm. Cabell has rented the land to Patr. Napier, Benjn. Thacker, & Anthony Askew. Send for escheat warrt. Delivered the sheriff the sci. fa. in Hickman v....
I sit down to petition your suffrage in favor of a friend, whose virtues and abilities have made him such to me, and will give him equal place in your esteem whenever you have an opportunity of becoming acquainted with them. The gentleman I speak of is the Revd. James Fontaine, who offers himself as a candidate for the place of chaplain to the house of burgesses. I do not wish to derogate from...
18Memorandum Books, 1769 (Jefferson Papers)
Jan. 1. Recd. of J. May Summs. in Witt v. Biby and also in Bowyer v. Buchanan, but Qu. wherefore the latter having sent one before. 12. Handcock v. Walker and Witt v. Biby. Delivd. Summ. to G. Thompson. Henry Rose (Amherst) v. Joseph Lifely. Friendly caveat for 148 acres Amherst. Employed by Rose. 16. John McCue (Albemarle) v. Alexander Patten (Amherst) and David Kincaid (Augusta). Enter...
I am truly concerned that it is not in my power to undertake the superintendance of your son in his studies; but my situation both present and future render it utterly impossible. I do not expect to be here more than two months in the whole between this and November next, at which time I propose to remove to another habitation which I am about to erect, and on a plan so contracted as that I...
Your messenger being about to return before I have an opportunity of conferring with Mr. Blair on the subject of your caveats, I must undertake an answer to your letter tho’ deprived of his assistance. As to the small survey of 220 acres, we need be at no other trouble or expence about it, Mrs. Wood and James Wood not proposing to defend it, and Harrison (as I understand) laying no claim to...
Ero apud Society spring on Tuesday per quatuor. Fortasse et I. Lepus-æmula veniet. Apis ibi et tu quoque. Ferto sequelam tuam Septentrionalem. Ferto etiam, ut ante tibi præcepi, tabulam scaccariam. Oculus feram viros. Si possemus gignere tabulam pro hac vice expressè factam, lignum apis puteus. Sed de hoc postea confabulemur. Suntne bubulæ terræ patris tui in Augusta salvæ? Id est nonne sint...
[7 September 1769] R un away from the subscriber in Albemarle , a Mulatto slave called Sandy , about 35 years of age, his stature is rather low, inclining to corpulence, and his complexion light; he is a shoemaker by trade, in which he uses his left hand principally, can do coarse carpenters work, and is something of a horse jockey; he is greatly addicted to drink, and when drunk is insolent...
A.6. ✓ Resolved that a question being once determined must stand as the judgment of the house, and cannot again be drawn into debate. A.9. ✓ Ordered that the orders for the business appointed for the day be read by the clerk before any other matter be proceeded on. A.5. ✓ Ordered that when a question shall arise between the greater and lesser sum or the longer and shorter time , the question...
24Memorandum Books, 1770 (Jefferson Papers)
Jan. 3. Inclosed writs in Harrison v. Bernard and Howell v. Netherland to Carter H. Harrison. 5. Committed my opinion in Dr. Campbell’s case to writing. 21. Donaghe v. Leeper. Delivd. Summses. to pl. Waterson’s and Johnston’s cases. Recd. by Hugh Donaghe 308 English half crowns = £48–2–6, 4 half Joes = £9, 1 Caroline and Portugal peice of gold £3–5–7 ½, two doubloons = £8–12 and two pistoles =...
I am to acquaint Mrs. Page of the loss of my favorite pullet; the consequence of which will readily occur to her. I promised also to give her some Virginia silk which I had expected, and I begin to wish my expectations may not prove vain. I fear she will think me but an ungainly acquaintance. My late loss may perhaps have reac[hed y]ou by this time, I mean the loss of my mother’s house by...
I take the liberty of interceding for your friendly aid to Mr. James Ogilvie a gentleman of my acquaintance now in London. Purposing last fall to go to Britain for orders he made the usual application to the commissary for his recommendatory letter to the bishop. This man, partly from an evil disposition to defeat the wishes of some gentlemen, no favorites of his, who bore a warm friendship to...
I am to beg the favor of your friendly interposition in the following case, which I hope you will think sufficient to excuse the freedom of the application. Sometime last fall Mr. Jas. Ogilvie proposing to go to Britain for orders made the usual application to the commissary for his recommendatory letter to the bishop. The commissary finding him somewhat deficient in his Greek expressed some...
I some time Since received a letter from Colo. Randolph of Tuckahoe requesting I would inform him what I knew of his right to Leatherwood land and as you are or will be his Lawer I trouble you with it which is as follows. There was leive granted by the Council to Colo. Peter Jefferson Charles Lynch and Ambross Smith to take up fifteen Thousand Acres of Land adjoining Randolph & Co. at the Wart...
29Memorandum Books, 1771 (Jefferson Papers)
Cash acct. in R. C. N.’s cases (till get into order). 1771 April 16. Scott v. Scott. Recd. 30/. May 4. Bowker v. Mimms. Recd. 25/. Octob.  15. Newby v. Bailey. Recd. 25/. 27. Archer v. Jones. Recd. 21/6. 31. Collier v. Mennis. 2 suits. Recd. £5. paper +  gold .
To be sold to the highest Bidders, on Thursday the 31st of this Instant (January) at the House of Colonel Bernard Moore , in King William, Eighteen Hundred Acres of land for the Life of Colonel Moore , lying on
To be let to the lowest bidder, on Thursday the 14 th of March, at Charlottesville, in Albemarle, The building of a prison of brick, with two rooms below, and two above stairs. Plans
Not expecting to have the pleasure of seeing you again before you leave the country I inclose you an order on the inspectors at Shockoe for two hhds. of tobacco which I consign to you, and give you also the trouble of shipping as I am too far from the spot to do it myself. They are to be laid out in the purchase of the articles on the back hereof. You will observe that part of these articles...
I wrote you a line from Wmsburgh last October; but lest that may have miscarried I take this opportunity of repeating what was material in that. On receipt of your letter (and, oh shame! of your only letter) of March 28. 1770. which came not to hand till August we took proper measures for prevailing on the commissary to withdraw his opposition. But lest you should be uneasy in your situation...
To be sold to the highest Bidders, on the second Wednesday in March, being the Day before Caroline Court, at Colonel Bernard Moore’s Plantation in Caroline, The Stocks of cattle, hogs, corn , and fodder.
To be sold to the highest Bidders, on the third Thursday in March, at King William Courthouse, being Court Day , Eleven Hundred and twenty five Acres of exceeding fine well timbered land lying on Pamunkey , below Ruffin’s
It is agreed between John Randolph, Esq., of the City of Williamsburg, and Thomas Jefferson, of the County of Albemarle, that in case the said John shall survive the said Thomas, that the Executors or Administrators of the said Thomas shall deliver to the said John 100 pounds sterling of the books of the said Thomas, to be chosen by the said John, or if not books sufficient, the deficiency to...
Yours of the eighth of April I have received, and since that your favour of five pounds as counsel for Messrs. Cunningham & Nisbett at the suit of Jamieson & Taylor. Before we can regularly proceed to take any proofs in the cause it will be necessary for Messrs. Cunningham & Nisbett to send us their answer denying or admitting the several charges in the bill as far as their own knowledge...
As it was somewhat doubtful when you left the country how far my little invoice delivered you might be complied with till we should know the fate of the association, I desired you to withhold purchasing the things till you should hear further from me. The day appointed for the meeting of the associates is not yet arrived, however from the universal sense of those who are likely to attend it...
Below I send you a state of the prices of the books you mentioned in your’s as far as it is my power to judge without having seen them. Much depends on their being new, much or little worn, and also upon the editions. And besides this the prices are sometimes accidentally high or low. However I have affixed such prices as I have usually known them cost in England. If the Hawkins’s pleas of the...
The case of Plume v. Portlock now lies at the Rules in danger of a dismission for want of a declaration. Mr. Blair directed me to apply to you for instructions in this matter. Your favor herein will oblige Dr. Sir Your friend and servt., P. S. On looking further into the Rule docket I find myself referred to you also for instructions to draw the bill in McVee v. Wilson . I have Wilson’s bond...
Among the Treasurer ’s causes which I have undertaken to finish is a suit brought against you by Martar . As I am an utter stranger to the nature of the demand of the plaintiff, and of your defence I must trouble you to give me timely notice of both. If you would chuse subpoenas to summon any evidences be pleased to write a line to Mr. James Steptoe my agent at the Secretary’s office who will...
I sat down with a design of executing your request to form a catalogue of books amounting to about 30. lib. sterl. but could by no means satisfy myself with any partial choice I could make. Thinking therefore it might be as agreeable to you, I have framed such a general collection as I think you would wish, and might in time find convenient, to procure. Out of this you will chuse for yourself...
I must again trouble you in the case of MacVee v. Wilson &c. Oranges, since on a second attempt to draw the bill I find my instructions deficient. The condition of the bond of Wilson to McVee is ‘that Wilson shall indemnify McVee from all costs of suits writs or disturbances that shall arise against the said McVee on the said James Wilson’s account by Mr. Paul Loyall or his assigns, and if any...
Know all men by these presents that we Thomas Jefferson and Francis Eppes are held and firmly bound to our sovereign lord the king his heirs and successors in the sum of fifty pounds current money of Virginia, to the paiment of which, well and truly to be made we bind ourselves jointly and severally, our joint and several heirs executors and administrators in witness whereof we have hereto set...
45Memorandum Books, 1772 (Jefferson Papers)
July 5. Roses v. Lifely. Wrote to Hugh Rose state of my acct. chargg. no new fee for 2d. caveat which makes the balce. £3–6–6. 7. Waterson’s cases. By written instrument of his (which see) the horse for which I gave him £20. is to be for my trouble with his caveats & petitions and as to his actions at law now depending whereon is a balance of £17–10. if I recover I am to have fees, otherwise...
I have just received notice from Mr. Wythe that in the case of Jamieson and Taylor v. Meredith and others he will move at the next court to have the effects delivered into the plaintiff’s hands. I have not yet had time to enquire whether such steps have been yet taken as will entitle him to do this. However it is better that your correspondents prevent it which cannot be done with certainty...
In the suit in Chancery brought by Jamieson and Taylor against Meredith, Cuningham and Nisbett, Macall Stedman and company underwriters to the policy of insurance which is the foundation of the suit, and yourselves as having effects of some of the underwriters in your hands, I find the only interrogatory of the bill you are concerned to answer is this ‘whether you or either of you have in your...
I obtained for you last June an order of council against Price for the 234. acres of land caveated by you. You must therefore before the 10th. day of December return to the Secretary’s office a copy of the order of council which will cost you 10/9, a copy of the survey, 5. rights 29/2, the governor’s fee 21/6, and Secretary’s fee 10/6 or the lands will be liable to a caveat. I observe Price...
Inclosed is a copy of Dickie’s bill against you. You will be pleased to send me a state of the case as it is to be set forth in your answer. In this you should take care to answer every allegation and interrogatory. As soon as I recieve this I shall put it into the form of an answer and return it to you to be sworn to. I am Sir Your humble sert., RC ( ViU : Cabell Deposit). On the back are...
Your scruples on that part of the answer which denies your having in your hands effects of any the defendants except Messrs. Conyngham and Nesbitt, are just. The circumstance of your holding any thing of Mr. McCaul’s was unknown to me. I now send you two answers. The one admits effects of Conyngham and Nesbitt and also of McCaul, and denies it as to the others. The other answer admits as to...