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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Page, John

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Your welfare, That of m’rs Page, and your heir apparent give me great joy: but much was I disappointed at not seeing you here today. surely you will visit the city some time in the co urt: do not let family attachments totally rusticate you. in answer to the interrogatories of your letter , I left my wife and family well; I have been in constant health myself and still continue . I left well,...
Your two favours of Mar. 15, and Aug. 23. 1785. by Monsieur de la Croix came to hand on the 15th. of November. His return gives me an opportunity of sending you a copy of the Nautical almanacs for 1786. 7. 8. 9. There is no late and interesting publication here or I would send it by the same conveiance. With these almanacs I pack a copy of some notes I wrote for Monsr. de Marbois in the year...
On receipt of your letter we enquired into the probability of getting your seal done here. We find a drawer and an engraver here both of whom we have reason to believe are excellent in their way. They did great seals for Jamaica and Barbadoes both of which are said to have been well done, and a seal for the Philosophical society here which we are told is excellent. But they are expensive, and...
Your favor of Nov. 16. recieved Nov. 26. is now before me and I inclose you a letter of mr Gore , which I presume we may consider as the final result of our endeavor to procure an asylum in the colony of Sierra Leone for such persons of the description composing that colony as we might find it expedient to send there. Since the date of the resolution which has been the subject of this...
Th: Jefferson asks again the intermediation of mr Page to convey to mr Robertson a corrected commission and he salutes him & mrs Page with great attachment and respect. DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
The Pot-clay, a Cherokee chief having lately died, his friend delivered to Majr. Martin a silver badge which he said had been given by the Governor of Virginia and therefore desired should be returned to him. It’s size, figure, and inscription is as below. To give you a better idea of it I inclose a reversed impression of it on paper. To shew you how little I think you have a right to refuse...
I am to acquaint Mrs. Page of the loss of my favorite pullet; the consequence of which will readily occur to her. I promised also to give her some Virginia silk which I had expected, and I begin to wish my expectations may not prove vain. I fear she will think me but an ungainly acquaintance. My late loss may perhaps have reac[hed y]ou by this time, I mean the loss of my mother’s house by...
Mr. John D. Burke, who is engaged in writing the history of Virginia is sollicitous to have the means of consulting some volumes of laws & newspapers among my collection at Monticello, and has asked that I would deposit them with you where he might have the convenience of consulting them. presuming he had your approbation, I have desired mr T.M. Randolph to have them securely packed, addressed...
I am sorry to hear that the Indians have commenced war, but greatly pleased you have been so decisive on that head. Nothing will reduce those wretches so soon as pushing the war into the heart of their country. But I would not stop there. I would never cease pursuing them while one of them remained on this side the Misisippi. So unprovoked an attack and so treacherous a one should never be...
Your’s of the 11th. is recieved. in appointments to public office of mere profit I have ever considered faithful service in either our first or second revolution as giving preference of claim, and that appointments on that principle would gratify the public and strengthen that confidence so necessary to enable the Executive to direct the whole public force to the best advantage of the nation....
I received your friendly letter of Apr. 28. by Mr. Mazzei on the 22d. of July. That of the month before by Monsr. Le Croix is not come to hand. This correspondence is grateful to some of my warmest feelings, as the friendships of my youth are those which stick closest to me, and in which I most confide. My principal happiness is now in the retrospect of life. I thank you for your notes of your...
I received your letter by Mr. Jamieson. It had given me much pain that the zeal of our respective friends should ever have placed you and me in the situation of competitors. I was comforted however with the reflection that it was their competition, not ours, and that the difference of the numbers which decided between us, was too insignificant to give you a pain or me a pleasure [had] our...
The case described in the inclosed letter is one to which I am an entire stranger. the writer seems really entitled to all the sympathies of our nature. the power of pardon resting with yourself, she should have addressed herself to you directly. I do not know whether she has done this or has counted on your known friendship to me, and that her distresses passing thro’ that channel would reach...
It appearing that Philip Williams & Jacob Ray charged with having committed a felony within the district of Columbia, have fled from justice, and have been found and arrested in the state of Virginia, it has become my duty on behalf of the said district to demand that the said Philip & Jacob be delivered up in order that they may be removed to the said district to be proceeded against...
Your letter with several others was put into my hands just as company was coming in to dinner yesterday, and it was not till late in the evening that I was free to open them, or I should not have deferred the answer till this morning.—I will certainly join you in the note you desire, but at the same time must ingenuously say that were the payment to fall on me, it would be impossible for me to...
‘In the midst of life we are in death.’ so has said some great moralist, and so says truth even for the young: and how much rather for us who have closed our thirteenth lustre! I have moreover heard that you have been particularly afflicted by want of health latterly, insomuch as to make it probable the indispensable attentions to your office are burthensome to you. would it be a relief to...
Your letter of Nov. 22. should have been sooner answered, had I had an earlier moment at which I could have done it. but it’s object has not been delayed. I put it immediately into the hands of Genl. Dearborne who promised to save you all further ceremony or trouble, by ordering the fugitive, if at fort Mc.Henry, to be sent down in irons & delivered to the civil authority at Norfolk. I hope...
Your favour of the 13th. desiring a suspension of the Act for raising new levies has been duly received and laid before the board. They think they cannot with any propriety suspend an Act after the Terms are all past by which it should have been carryed into execution. It would only answer the end of a remission of Penalties which would be an Abuse of the suspending Power given them by the...
You have probably seen or heard of some very abusive letters addressed to me in the publick papers by a mr Martin of Baltimore, on the subject of Logan’s speech, cited in the Notes on Virginia. I do not mean to notice mr Martin, or go into the newspapers on the subject. but I am still anxious to enquire into the foundation of that story, & if I find any thing wrong in it it shall be corrected,...
This very day, to others the day of greatest mirth and jollity, sees me overwhelmed with more and greater misfortunes than have befallen a descendant of Adam for these thousand years past I am sure; and perhaps, after excepting Job, since the creation of the world. I think his misfortunes were somewhat greater than mine: for although we may be pretty nearly on a level in other respects, yet I...
Your’s of May 30’th came safe to hand. The rival you mentioned I know not whether to think formidable or not as there has been so great an opening for him during my absence. I say ‘has been’ because I expect there is one no longer since you have undertaken to act as my attorney. You advise me to ‘go immediately and lay siege in form.’ You certainly did not think at the time you wrote this of...
This letter will be conveied to you by the assistance of our friend Warner Lewis. Poor fellow! never did I see one more sincerely captivated in my life. He walked to the Indian camp with her yesterday, by which means he had an opportunity of giving her two or three love squeezes by the hand, and like a true Arcadian swain, has been so enraptured ever since that he is company for no one. Betsy...
Yours of the 2d. inst. has been duly recieved. I have altogether declined my journey to Bedford, and therefore am in no danger of being absent when yourself & family shall render us the kindness of a visit. as all roads appear bad to the traveller, and he is liable to be ill-advised in the choice of them, I take the liberty, on my own knolege of the routes from Richmond here, as well as on the...
I received your letter of Wednesday the 18th instant; in that, of this day, you mention one which you wrote last Friday, and sent by the Secretary ’s boy; but I have neither seen nor heard of such a one. God send, mine of Jan. 19 to you may not have shared the same fate; for, by your letter, I am uncertain whether you have received it or not; you therein say, ‘you hope to have received an...
I received your last by T. Nelson whom I luckily met on my road hither. Surely never did small hero experience greater misadventures than I did on the first two or three days of my travelling. Twice did my horse run away with me and greatly endanger the breaking my neck on the first day. On the second I drove two hours through as copious a rain as ever I have seen, without meeting with a...