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Supposing the particulars of the New York election interesting to you, I will give you a statement of the votes, as follows. Clinton Jay Suffolk  481. 228 Queen’s county  532 288 King’s county  244 92 City & County of N.Y.  603 739 Orange  551 80 Dutchess  751
I inclose you a state of the case between Barrett and myself. You will be so good as to observe that it is not the money sued for that I care a rush about, but that I am anxious it should not be thought that I had put anybody to the trouble or delay of suing me for a just debt. Barrett, by suing me without having applied to me either personally or by letter, put it out of my power to propose...
I am a stranger to the instructions given to Mr. Short on the subject of money, the correspondence thereon having been [direct?] between the Sec. of the Treasury and him, without any mediary. Neither do I know whether any authority was given or not to G. Morris on that subject. The payment of the 19th. of Aug. was made in consequence of a letter from G. Morris as I have reason to believe....
The following suits were put into the hands of Mr. N. Pope in 1791. to wit  £  s d against Lewis & Woodson on bond. principal & interest to Sep. 30. 1791. were 192– 12– 9 1/2 against Woodson on his Note.   do.     to do.   7– 14– 2 against Lewis on Account of rent. balance & interest to Sep. 30. 1791  86–  7– 0 1/2 286– 14– 0 Out of these monies when recovered the following orders were given
The expectation that you are always from home, prevents my writing to you with regularity; a matter of little consequence to you, as you probably receive Freneau’s paper regularly, and consequently all the news of any importance.—The fiscal party having tricked the house of representatives out of the negative vote they obtained, seem determined not to lose the ground they gained by entering...
I am to acknolege the receipt of your favors of May 8. and 23. and to express my perfect satisfaction with what you have done in the case of Barrett. With respect to the interest from the date of the judgment it is a thing of course, and always as just as the judgment itself. If he swears that the account is unpaid, I shall be satisfied he believes it to be so, and in that case would always...
I have to acknolege your favor of May 28. I believe that through all America there has been but a single sentiment on the subject of peace and war, which was in favor of the former. The Executive here has cherished it with equal and unanimous desire. We have differed perhaps as to the tone of conduct exactly adapted to the securing it. We have as yet no indications of the intentions or even...
Your favor of June 27. has been duly received. You have most perfectly seised the original idea of the proclamation. When first proposed as a declaration of neutrality it was opposed 1. because the Executive had no power to declare neutrality, 2. as such a declaration would be premature and would lose us the benefits for which it might be bestowed. It was urged that there was a strong...
The bearer hereof, Mr. Franklin , being about to return to America, I take the liberty of presenting him to your acquaintance. Your esteem for the character of his grandfather would have procured him a favourable reception with you: and it cannot but increase your desire to know him, when you shall be assured that his worth and qualifications give him a personal claim to it. I have taken the...
I find the calculation of the As of Holland (which is the common measure applied by the Encyclopedie to all coins) will be so difficult to trace through the coins and weights of Holland and Spain, that no public assembly will ever understand them. Consequently it is better to rest the question altogether on the report of the Board of Treasury of Apr. 8. 1786. and the Consequent Final decision...
The Spanish dollar dwt   grs. dwt   till 1728. had  11– 4 of pure metal in every 12 of mixed.   from 1728. to 1772.  10–21   since 1772  10–17 Extract from the Encyclopedie. The do llar of 1728–1772 being taken as our standard, we have this grs mixed grs alloy
The rival propositions Objections. 1. The inaccuracies of admeasurements over hills, vallies, rivers, and, in this instance, over high mountains, the Pyrenees. 2. This gives them but 9.° or 1/10 of the quadrant. The other 9/10 they are to obtain by calculation, founded on hypothesis. 3. The length of time, the apparatus, the number of Mathematicians to be employed (to wit 6. committees of 3....
The small pox at Richmond has cut off the communication by post to or through that place. I should have thought it Davies’s duty to have removed his office a little way out of town, that the communication might not have been interrupted. Instead of that it is said the inhabitants of the country are to be prosecuted because they thought it better to refuse a passage to his post riders than take...
I wrote to Mr. Madison on the 3d. inst. Since that I have received his of Mar. 24. 26. 31. and Apr. 14. and yours of Mar. 26. 31. and Apr. 2. which had been accumulating in the post office of Richmond. The spirit of war has grown much stronger, in this part of the country, as I can judge of myself, and in other parts along the mountains from N.E. to S.W. as I have had opportunities of learning...
Mr. Nathaniel Anderson , formerly of Richmond, but now of our county, informs me that he has a son settled or about to settle in Havre, in the mercantile line, whom he wishes to be made known to you, and to have the benefit of your countenance in his new establishment. Tho’ myself personally unacquainted with the son, I have long been much acquainted with the father whose merit affords a...
I have recieved your favor of Sep. 7. from Paris, which gave us the only news we have had from you since your arrival there. On my part it would be difficult to say why this is the first time I have written to you. Revising the case myself, I am sensible it has proceeded from that sort of procrastination which so often takes place when no circumstance fixes a business to a particular time. I...
I wrote you on the 26th. of May last. Since that Mr. Jones has been here and Mr. Madison, and have communicated to me some of your letters. Mr. Jones is taking good measures for saving and improving your land, but of all this he will inform you. I inclose you a letter for Mde. Bellanger, which I leave open for your perusal as it’s contents may suggest to you some service to Derieux. I also...
I wrote you two letters in the course of the last twelvemonths to wit May 26. and Sep. 6. 95. and have recieved from you those of Sep. 7. 94. and June 23. 95. neither of which were late enough to inform me if either of mine had got to hand. In those I gave you all the details public and private which my situation enabled me to do. In the last I asked the delivery of a note to Frouillé for some...
I wrote you on the 2d. inst. and now take the liberty of troubling you in order to have the inclosed letter to Mr. Gautier safely handed to him. I will thank you for information that it gets safely to hand, as it is of considerable importance to him, to the US. to the state of Virginia, and to myself, by conveying to him the final arrangement of the accounts of Grand & Co. with all those...
The dreadful misfortune of poor Derieux , who has lost his house and all it’s contents by fire occasions the present letter to cover one from him to his aunt. I send it open for your perusal. Be so good as to seal and send it. I hope she will if she has not done it already, send him some relief. I recieved only 3. weeks ago your favor of Nov. 18. It had been 5. months on it’s way to me. The...
Your brother recieved a letter from you a few days since in which he says you mention having recieved but two from me since you left us. I have not been a very troublesome correspondent to you, I acknolege, but have written letters of the following dates to you, to wit 1794. Mar. 11. Apr. 24.—1795. May 26. Sep. 6.—1796. June 12. In this last I acknoleged the reciept of yours of Nov. 18. and...
The doubt which you suggest as to our jurisdiction over the case of the grand jury v. Cabell, had occurred to me, and naturally occurs on first view of the question. But I knew that to send the petition to the H. of Represent. in Congress, would make bad worse, that a majority of that house would pass a vote of approbation. On examination of the question too it appeared to me that we could...
I like your second title better than the first because it [is shorter.] I should like the following better than either. ‘The Foreign affairs of the US. during the years 1794. 5. 6. laid before his fellow citizens by J.M. their late M.P. to the republic of France.’ The reason of my preference is that it implies no inculpation of the Executive. Such an implication will determine prejudiced men...
I communicated to Mr. M. the evening I was with him the papers you sent by me for Mr. D. He was clearly of opinion nothing further ought to be done. D. was decisively of the same opinion. This being the case then there was no ground for consulting L. or B. and accordingly nothing has been said to them. Your book was later coming out than was to have been wished: however it works irresistably....
I recieved yesterday by mr Giles yours of Jan. 27. and am well pleased with the indications of republicanism in our assembly. their law respecting the printer is a good one. I only wish they would give the printing of the laws to one & journals to another. this would secure two, as each portion of the business would be object enough to a printer, and two places in their gift would keep within...
I have to acknolege the receipt of yours of Feb. 12. 19. & 25. at length the charm is broke, and letters have been recieved from our envoys at Paris. one only of them has been communicated, of which I inclose you a copy with the documents accompanying it. the decree therein proposed to be passed has struck the greatest alarm through the merchants I have ever yet witnessed. as it has not been...
The public papers will present to you the almost insane message sent to both houses of Congress 2. or 3. days ago. this has added to the alarm of the sounder and most respectable part of our merchants, I mean those who are natives & are solid in their circumstances & do not need the lottery of war to get themselves to rights. the effect of the French decree on the representatives had been to...
I wrote you last on the 21st. of Mar. since which yours of the 26th. of March is recieved. Yesterday I had a consultation with mr Dawson on the matter respecting Skipwith . we have neither of us the least hesitation, on a view of the ground, to pronounce against your coming forward in it at all. your name would be the watchword of party at this moment, and the question would give opportunities...
I wrote you on the 5th. inst. and on the 12th . I inclosed you a copy of the instructions & communications from our envoys. in that of the 5th. I acknoleged the receipt of your last at hand of Mar. 26. the impressions first made by those communications continue strong & prejudicial here. they have enabled the merchants to get a war-petition very extensively signed. they have also carried over...
Yours of Apr. 8. 14. & May 4. & 14 have been recieved in due time. I have not written to you since the 19th. Ult. because I knew you would be out on a circuit, and would recieve the letters only when they would be as old almanachs. the bill for the Provisional army has got through the lower house, the regulars reduced to 10,000. and the volunteers unlimited. it was carried by a majority of 11....
Dr. Bache having determined to remove to our neighborhood, informs me he has written to you to purchase lands for him. a day or two before I left home mrs Key sent me a message that the lands on which she lives & her son Walter’s were for sale. I therefore inclose you a letter to her, informg her that I have communicated it to the gentleman here whom I had under contemplation when I spoke to...
The newspapers furnish you with the articles of common news as well as the Congressional. you observe the addition proposed to be made to our navy, and the loan of 5. millions opened at 8. percent to equip it. the papers say that our agents abroad are purchasing vessels for this purpose. the following is as accurate a statement of our income & expence, annual , as I can form, after divesting...
I wrote you last on the 23d. of Jan. since which yours of Jan. 26. is recieved. a bill will pass the Senate to-day for enabling the President to retaliate rigorously on any French citizens who now are or hereafter may be in our power, should they put to death any sailors of ours forced on board British vessels & taken by the French. this is founded expressly on their arret of Oct. 29. 98....
I am so hard pressed for time that I can only announce to you a single event: but that is a great one. it seems that soon after Gerry’s departure from France, overtures must have been made by Pichon, French chargé d’affaires at the Hague to Murray. these were so soon matured that on the 28th. of Sep. 98. Taleyrand writes to Pichon approving what had been done & particularly of his having...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Colo. Monroe, & his sincere congratulations to him & mrs Monroe on the interesting addition to their family. he wishes to know how mrs Monroe & the youngster do; and would be made very happy if he could offer any thing grateful to [mrs] Monroe. rice, pearl barley &c sometimes useful to the sick, she probably has: if not, they are here at her service....
Yours of Jan. 4. was recieved last night. I had then no expectation of any opportunity of communicating to you confidentially information of the state of opinions here. but I learn to-night that two mr Randolphs will set out tomorrow morning for Richmond. if I can get this into their hands I shall send it. otherwise it may wait long. on the subject of an election by a general ticket or by...
Nobody here has recieved mr Madison’s report as it passed the house . the members of the different states are waiting to recieve & forward a single copy to their states to be reprinted there. this would require half a dozen copies. but if you send me one, we can have it reprinted here & sent out. pray do it by the first post. if it was not printed there as amended in a separate pamphlet then...
A mr Robinson proposing to go to Richmond with a view to establish an academy there, I have been desired to state to you his character and qualifications, as I learn them from Doctr. Reynolds of this city, for I have never seen mr Robinson, nor is he here at present. he is a person of a regular collegiate education, of Trinity college Dublin, and has documents of his recieving double premiums...
I thank you for the part of the ‘ Communications from the states ,’ which I recieved yesterday from you as I presume by the superscription of the letter; and will ask the residue (from page 48.) when it appears. a great impression made here of the Resolutions of the Virga legislature has been sold off, and dispersed into the other states. I inclose you an amendmt proposed by W. C. Nicholas to...
Your favor of the 6th. came to hand last night. mr Erving had left town two days before: however it will go tomorrow morning by a private hand. it will much more than satisfy him. I am persuaded he will recieve it with extreme pleasure. I either expressed myself badly in my letter, or you have understood the expressions too generally. I never doubted the impropriety of our adopting as a system...
I am sorry your servant had such a chase to find me. I came to this place on Saturday . he got here in the night last night. further reflection on the matter which had been proposed in conversation the evening before I left you, convinced me that it could not succeed, that obstacles must arise to it, and that these would give rise to disagreeable incidents. could I have seen you therefore in...
Mr. Craven, who was here at the receipt of your favor of the 15th. & will probably be here a week longer, desires me to inform you that he communicates by this day’s post, your terms to mr Darrelle, and that he is thoroughly persuaded he will accede to them. he is very anxious you should retain the lands for Darrelle, who is his father in law, and whose removal into the neighborhood is...
Yours of the 12th. came to hand yesterday. we shall be happy to recieve mrs Monroe & yourself again among us, but as you speak of your coming with some uncertainty, I prepare the present for the post. Craven has been gone back some time. he was anxious to get his father in [law’s] purchase of you concluded. he said indeed he would have taken on him[self to] conclude it, but that mr Darrelle...
Yours by your servant has been delivered as also that by mr Erwin. I think Skipwith’s letter contains some paragraphs which would do considerable good in the newspapers. I shall inclose that & the other by mr Erwin to mr Madison, to be returned to you. I shall set out for Washington so as to arrive there as soon as I suppose the answer to the speech is delivered. it is possible some silly...
Your’s of the 16th. came to hand yesterday morning, and in the course of the day it happened that Craven arrived here, so that I had an opportunity of enquiring into what you wished to know. He says that Darrelle failed altogether in the sale of his land so that he was unable to purchase. I asked him if some accomodation as to time, which might give him time to sell, might not induce him to...
The H. of R. has been in conclave ever since 2. aclock yesterday. 25. ballots have been taken at intervals of from half an hour to an hour. they were invariably 8. 6. & 2 divided. I can venture nothing more by post but my affectionate salutations to yourself & mrs Monroe. P.S. 1. P.M. the H. of R. suspended the balloting from 7. to 12. this morning & after trying a few balots with the same...
I have recieved several letters from you which have not been acknoleged. by the post I dare not, and one or two confidential opportunities have past me by surprise. I have regretted it the less, because I knew you could be more safely and fully informed by others. mr Tyler, the bearer of this, will give you a great deal more information personally than can be done by letter. four days of...
I had written the inclosed letter to mrs Trist, and was just proceeding to begin one to you, when your favor of the 6th . was put into my hand. I thank you sincerely for it, and consider the views of it so sound, that I have communicated it to my coadjutors as one of our important evidences of the public sentiment, according to which we must shape our course. I suspect, partly from this, but...
I am late in answering your favor of the 4th. because the Navy department, from an extraordinary press of business, could not till within this day or two furnish me the inclosed papers . you will see by them that the money for Gosport (12,000. D.) has been placed in Norfolk at mr Hopkins’s command, ever since the last week in January. why it should have been witheld so long he will probably...
In mine of the 22d. I forgot to write on the subject of Callender , tho’ I had reserved that, for some time, to make a part of the letter. D.M.R. has contrived to put the money in such a situation that I find we could not lay our hands on it without giving room for specious criticisms. that would be a gratification to which he is not entitled. it will moreover strengthen the reasons for laying...