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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Monroe, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Monroe, James"
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The Executive have occasion to employ a gentleman in a confidential business, requiring great discretion, and some acquaintance with military things. They wish you to undertake it if not inconsistant with your present pursuits. It will call you off some weeks, to the distance of a couple hundred miles. Expences will be borne and a reasonable premium. Will you be so good as to attend us...
You will proceed with the riders provided for you, stationing one at every forty miles or thereabouts from hence to the vicinity of the British army in Carolina where you will continue yourself, observing their movements and when their importance requires it, communicating them to me. Instruct your riders to travel by night and day without regard to weather giving and taking way bills...
I have lodged with Mrs. Sherrar a small box of books containing Chandler’s debates of the lords and commons (one volume lost) and the Historical register of which I beg your acceptance. I am just now setting out to Monticello where I shall be happy to see you at all times, should health or curiosity lead you thither or a willingness to give that pleasure to Dr. Sir your friend & humble servt,...
I should have been and shall always be happy to see you at Monticello, but could not expect so much of the little time you have to prepare for your journey. I inclose you three letters, the one directed to Dr. Franklin, the other two for Mr. Jay and Mr. Adams but not directed because I really do not know the address of those two gentlemen. This you will be able to learn before you shall have...
I have been gratified with the receipt of your two favours of the 6th. and 11th. inst. It gives me pleasure that your county has been wise enough to enlist your talents into their service. I am much obliged by the kind wishes you express of seeing me also in Richmond, and am always mortified when any thing is expected from me which I cannot fulfill, and more especially if it relate to the...
Your favor of the 9th . came to hand yesterday and relieved us from the fear that sickness or some other accident had detained you. I am very particularly obliged to you for the attention you have been so good as to pay to my accomodation; several circumstances had prevented my taking measures for this purpose so early as I wished. I had ultimately relied on Mr. Carrol, who left this place two...
Books sold to Colo. Monroe s Chastellux Felicité publique. 2.v. 13. 6  Helvetius de l’homme. 3.v. 13. 6. Gravina l’esprit des loix Romaines 3.v. 19. Barbeyrac discours. 2.v. 10. Vicat Droit naturel. 2.v. 15. Felice. droit de la nature 18. Certitude de Mahometisme 13. 6 Oeuvres de Mably. 4.v.
1784. May 10. To books  21– 12–  8 To Bedding  13–  0–  0 To houshold articles, one moiety  29–  5– 11 To household expences from May 2. one moiety  16– 14–  0 £80– 12–
Your favor of the 14th. came duly to hand. It enabled me to give to Colo. Humphries the first intimation of his appointment and to see that he received real pleasure from it. He was before unknown to me; but our future connection in business has occasioned me to enquire into his character with which I am much pleased. We have taken arrangements for passing the Atlantic together. Short is not...
[ Philadelphia, 25 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “[May] 25. Colo. Monroe. Inclosed the 270. Dollars back again—I pay Boinod 2⅓ for him—inclosed the Gov’s and Jamieson’s letters to him—shall sail from Boston about 20th June—Short to hasten—acknolege receipt of cypher.” Letter and enclosures not found. The letter from Gov. Harrison may have been that to TJ of 14 May 1784 , and that from David...
[ Philadelphia, 28 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “Colo Monroe. Commissions to France, Holld. Sweden.” Not found. For these three supplementary commissions, see Thomson to TJ, 18 June 1784 .]
Your journey to the Westward having prevented my writing to you till now that a letter may probably find you at Congress, I shall resume the correspondence discontinued since I left Boston. My passage was remarkeably short, being only 19 days from land to land, and I suffered little by sickness. Having very thick weather when we approached the coast of Europe, we fell in with no vessel which...
I wrote you the 11th. of Nov. by the last packet. Since that I have received by Mr. Short yours of July 20. inclosing the cypher. I hope that the establishment of a port on each river will end in the final success of one or of two only. Actual circumstances will prevent York and Tappahanoc from being any thing in spite of any encouragement. The accumulation of commodities at Norfolk and...
My letters of Nov. 11. and Dec. 10. will have reached you before your receipt of this. They acknowleged the receipt of your former letters, as this does of the one of Nov. 1. but what was my mortification when I came to apply the cypher to it to find that I could not make out one syllable of it: and the more so as it is the only letter I have received from America by this packet. Whether you...
You were informed by my letters of Nov. 11 and Jan. 14. that the cypher established between us would not explain a syllable of your letters. Those of Nov. 1. and Dec. 14. having rendered me extremely desirous of decyphering them, I sat to work with a resolution to effect it if possible. I soon found that they were written by your first cypher . To this therefore I applied myself and after...
I wrote you by the packet which sailed from hence in Feb. and then acknoleged the receipt of yours of Dec. 14. which came by the packet arriving here in Jan. That which sailed from N.Y. in Jan. and arrived here in Feb. brings me no letter from any body except from Mr. Jay to Mr. Adams Dr. F. and myself jointly. Since my last the rumour of an exchange proposed between the Emperor and El. of...
We wrote a public letter to Mr. Jay the day before yesterday. We were induced to hasten it, because young Mr. Chaumont was to set out yesterday for l’Orient to go to N. York in the packet, and a private conveyance is alone to be depended on for secrecy. I have put off writing any letters as long as I could, expecting the arrival of the packet. She is arrived, as the packet of the last month...
This will be delivered you by young Mr. Adams whom I beg leave to introduce to your acquaintance and recommend as worthy of your friendship. He possesses abilities, learning, application, and the best of dispositions. Considering his age too you will find him more improved by travel than could have been expected. A Monsr. Doradour also goes in the packet to New York, and from thence proceeds...
I received three days ago your favor of Apr. 12. You therein speak of a former letter to me, but it has not come to hand, nor any other of later date than the 14th. of December. My last to you was of the 11th. of May by Mr. Adams who went in the packet of that month. These conveiances are now becoming deranged. We have had expectations of their coming to Havre which would infinitely facilitate...
[ Paris, 4 July 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “Madison, Monroe & Hardy. Letters of recommendation for W. T. Franklin.” None of these letters has been found; but see TJ to Monroe, 5 July 1785 .]
I wrote you by Mr. Adams May. 11. and by Mr. Otto June 17. The latter acknoleged the receipt of yours of Apr. 12. which is the only one come to hand of later date than Dec. 14. Little new has occurred since my last. Peace seems to shew herself under a more decided form. The emperor is now on a journey to Italy, and the two Dutch plenipotentiaries are set out for Vienna there to make an apology...
I wrote you fully on the 5th. and gave also to young Mr. Franklin a letter of introduction to you dated the 4th. Besides these I have addressed this day a letter to our delegation in Congress on the subject of Mr. Houdon. That will apprise you fully of his merit and objects. I have now only to add in a particular letter to yourself my prayers to give him personally all those aids and counsels...
I wrote you on the 5th. of July by Mr. Franklin and on the 12th. of the same month by Monsr. Houdon. Since that date yours of June 16. by Mr. Mazzei is received. Every thing looks like peace here. The settlement between the Emperor and Dutch is not yet published, but it is believed to be agreed. Nothing is done as yet between him and the Porte. He is much wounded by the Confederation of...
I wrote you by the Mr. Fitzhughs on the 28th. of August, and since that have received yours of Aug. 15. and 25. This intermission on my part has been owing to your information that you would not return to Congress till about Christmas: to which must be added the want of opportunity since the derangement of the French packets. Be so good as to inform Mr. Jay that the last is the cause he has...
I wrote you on the llth. of December, and on the llth. of this month I received your favor of July 15 entrusted to Mrs. McCaulay Graham. I do not know from what place she sent it. The last papers from America present us a very disagreeable altercation between Mr. Jay and a young man from whom he had deserved better things. Mr. Carmichael will I fear too think himself involved. With him I am...
The present is merely to inclose to you a letter I have received from a lady who is distressed on account of her son at Elizabeth town, and to pray you to enquire into his situation and either write it to me, or get him to write to his mother and to forward it through you. I wish you happiness at all times being with very sincere esteem Dr. Sir, Your affectionate friend & Servt., RC ( NN );...
My last to you was of Jan. 27. Since that I have received yours of Jan. 19. Information from other quarters gives me reason to suspect you have in negotiation a very important change in your situation. You will carry into the execution all my wishes for your happiness. I hope it will not detach you from a settlement in your own country. I had even entertained hopes of your settling in my...
I wrote you last on the 10th. of May, since which your favor of May 11. has come to hand. The political world enjoys great quiet here. The King of Prussia is still living, but like the snuff of a candle which sometimes seems out, and then blazes up again. Some think that his death will not produce any immediate effect in Europe. His kingdom, like a machine will go for some time with the...
I wrote you last on the 9th. of July and since that have recieved yours of the 16th. of June with the interesting intelligence it contained. I was entirely in the dark as to the progress of that negociation, and concur entirely in the views you have of it. The difficulty on which it hangs is a sine qua non with us. It would be to deceive them and ourselves to suppose that an amity can be...
Your letters of Aug. 19. and Oct. 12. have come duly to hand. My last to you was of the 11th. of August. Soon after that date I got my right wrist dislocated, which has till now deprived me of the use of my pen: and even now I can use it but slowly and with pain. The revisal of the Congressional intelligence contained in your letters makes me regret the loss of it on your departure. I feel too...