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Reynolds , collector of York, is dead, and Wm. Carey of that place is recommended very strongly by mr Shields. tho’ I have great confidence in mr Shields’s recommendation, yet as the best men some times see characters thro’ the false medium of friendship I pray you to make what enquiry you can in Richmond & communicate it to me. Accept assurances of my constant & affectionate esteem & respect....
[ Philadelphia, 25 May 1784 . Entry in SJL reads: “[May] 25. Colo. Monroe. Inclosed the 270. Dollars back again—I pay Boinod 2⅓ for him—inclosed the Gov’s and Jamieson’s letters to him—shall sail from Boston about 20th June—Short to hasten—acknolege receipt of cypher.” Letter and enclosures not found. The letter from Gov. Harrison may have been that to TJ of 14 May 1784 , and that from David...
Yours of Jan. 4. was recieved last night. I had then no expectation of any opportunity of communicating to you confidentially information of the state of opinions here. but I learn to-night that two mr Randolphs will set out tomorrow morning for Richmond. if I can get this into their hands I shall send it. otherwise it may wait long. on the subject of an election by a general ticket or by...
I wrote you last on the 21st. of Mar. since which yours of the 26th. of March is recieved. Yesterday I had a consultation with mr Dawson on the matter respecting Skipwith . we have neither of us the least hesitation, on a view of the ground, to pronounce against your coming forward in it at all. your name would be the watchword of party at this moment, and the question would give opportunities...
I thank you for your letter of the 6 th . it is a proof of your friendship, and of the sincere interest you take in whatever concerns me. of this I have never had a moment’s doubt, and have ever valued it as a precious treasure. the question indeed whether I knew or approved of Gen l Wilkinson’s endeavors to prevent the restoration of the right of deposit at N. Orleans could never require a...
Supposing the particulars of the New York election interesting to you, I will give you a statement of the votes, as follows. Clinton Jay Suffolk  481. 228 Queen’s county  532 288 King’s county  244 92 City & County of N.Y.  603 739 Orange  551 80 Dutchess  751
I recieved yesterday by mr Giles yours of Jan. 27. and am well pleased with the indications of republicanism in our assembly. their law respecting the printer is a good one. I only wish they would give the printing of the laws to one & journals to another. this would secure two, as each portion of the business would be object enough to a printer, and two places in their gift would keep within...
Your favor of June 17. has been duly recieved. I am endeavoring to get for you the lodgings Langdon had. But the landlord is doubtful whether he will let them at all. If he will not, I will endeavor to do the best I can. I can accomodate you myself with a stable and coach house without any expence, as I happen to have two on hand: and indeed in my new one I have had stalls enough prepared for...
The moment, my dear friend, is come which I was so anxious should happen in your time. the office of P.M. in Richm d is become vacant by the long expected death of the incumbent, and I cannot omit to urge my former suits in behalf of Col o Peyton. in the several cases in which I have been forced to hand to you the names of sollicitants for office I never suffered my wishes to go beyond the...
Mr. Craven, who was here at the receipt of your favor of the 15th. & will probably be here a week longer, desires me to inform you that he communicates by this day’s post, your terms to mr Darrelle, and that he is thoroughly persuaded he will accede to them. he is very anxious you should retain the lands for Darrelle, who is his father in law, and whose removal into the neighborhood is...
Since mine of the 26th. Callender is arrived here. he did not call on me; but understanding he was in distress, I sent Capt Lewis to him with 50. D. to inform him we were making some enquiries as to his fine which would take a little time, & lest he suffer in the mean time I had sent him &c. his language to Capt Lewis was very high toned. he intimated that he was in possession of things which...
A confidential opportunity offering by mr Baring, I can venture to write to you with less reserve than common conveyances admit. the 150 livres you paid to mr Chas for me shall be replaced in the hands of mr Lewis your manager here, with thanks to you for honoring what you had no reason to doubt was a just claim on me. I do not know him personally or any otherwise than by his history of our...
I some days ago made a remittance to mr Jefferson with a request that he would pay you the amount of Jones’s bill with the costs and other disbursements. for these last he would have to ask your information as they were not stated on the bill. with this, be so good as to accept my thanks for the attention you have paid to this commission, and the trouble it has given you. from Your letter of...
The bearer hereof is mr Whitney of Connecticut a mechanic of the first order of ingenuity, who invented the Cotton gin now so much used to the South; he is at the head of a considerable gun manufactory in Connecticut, and furnishes the US. with muskets, undoubtedly the best they recieve. he has invented moulds & machines for making all the peices of his locks so exactly equal, that take 100...
The present is merely to inclose to you a letter I have received from a lady who is distressed on account of her son at Elizabeth town, and to pray you to enquire into his situation and either write it to me, or get him to write to his mother and to forward it through you. I wish you happiness at all times being with very sincere esteem Dr. Sir, Your affectionate friend & Servt., RC ( NN );...
Our Visitors determined to make a report to the Governor as their patron, of the progress and prospects of our College , with a view to place it before the legislature for their aid or adoption. I have this moment, and at this place prepared such a report, but as it will be some time before it can go the rounds of all the visitors for their signatures, your greater distance requires the...
Your favor of the 16th. came to hand yesterday, & by this day’s post I inclose you a draught on Gibson & Jefferson for 50. D. payable to Majr. Wm. Duval to whom you will be so good as to explain that it is for Genl. Lawson . I now write an answer to the Genl. but will keep it back a couple of days as it furnishes me in that way an excuse for having previously placed the money in Duval’s hands....
The doubt which you suggest as to our jurisdiction over the case of the grand jury v. Cabell, had occurred to me, and naturally occurs on first view of the question. But I knew that to send the petition to the H. of Represent. in Congress, would make bad worse, that a majority of that house would pass a vote of approbation. On examination of the question too it appeared to me that we could...
It had escaped my recollection till this moment that you had desired me to send you the copy of La Harpe’s journal. you will find bound up with it some Extracts from it which I had made because bearing immediately on the question of right, and a duplicate copy of the letters of Cevallos Salcedo & Herrera . if your office possesses the original, as I am sure it does, I will be glad to have this...
I recieved your letter at dusk, when no candle was lighted, & not suspecting your so sudden departure told the servant not to wait for an—answer, & that I would send it. I hope I shall be able to send the papers in the morning before you will have departed. The letter of Lewis shews that Barron is a most unprincipled men, and the sentence of the court shews him unworthy of any military trust....
Yours of the 12th. came to hand yesterday. we shall be happy to recieve mrs Monroe & yourself again among us, but as you speak of your coming with some uncertainty, I prepare the present for the post. Craven has been gone back some time. he was anxious to get his father in [law’s] purchase of you concluded. he said indeed he would have taken on him[self to] conclude it, but that mr Darrelle...
You informed me that the instruments you had been so kind as to bring for me from England would arrive at Richmond with your baggage and you wished to know what was to be done with them there. I will ask the favor of you to deliver them to mr Jefferson who will forward them to Monticello in the way I shall advise him: and I must intreat you to send me either a note of their amount, or the...
I recieved last night your favor of the 8th. and I readily embrace both ideas of amendment suggested by you. I will pray you therefore in the last page of the letter, lines 9. & 10. to strike out the words ‘him, and executed with the aid of the Federal executive? these’ and insert ‘them. they’ or rather turn ‘him’ into ‘them’ by prefixing a t, and putting a loop to the i, thus e. and turn...
I wrote you on the 2d. inst. and now take the liberty of troubling you in order to have the inclosed letter to Mr. Gautier safely handed to him. I will thank you for information that it gets safely to hand, as it is of considerable importance to him, to the US. to the state of Virginia, and to myself, by conveying to him the final arrangement of the accounts of Grand & Co. with all those...
I sent to mr Divers to-day to ask a dinner for mr Correa , D r Wistar , mr Gilmer & myself for tomorrow. I did not venture to add your name and mr Rush ’s not knowing your convenience; but I am sure he will be rejoiced to see you both. Affectionate salutations to yourself & mr Rush
Your letters of Nov. 30. & Dec. 21. have been recieved with great pleasure. a truth now and then projecting into the ocean of Newspaper lies, serves like headlands to correct our course. indeed my scepticism as to every thing I see in a newspaper makes me indifferent whether I ever see one. the embarrasments at Washington in August last, I expected would be great in any state of things; but...
The events which have lately taken place at Washington , & which truly disgrace our enemies much more than us, have occupied you too much to admit intrusions by private & useless letters. you seem indeed to have had your hands full with the duties of the field and the double duties of the Cabinet. the success of M c Donough has been happily timed to dispel the gloom of your present meeting,...
I do not know by what individuals the association was formed which is the subject of the inclosed letter to mr Morse. I suppose them to have been few and private, and that the undertaking must have been on too partial a view of the subject. I observe your name not on the roll, and for a reason too light to have been the true one: and I suspect therefore it has been refused for good reasons. be...
I thank you for the communication of the President’s message which has not yet reached us thro’ the public papers. it is an interesting document, always looked for with anxiety, and the late one is equally able as interesting. I hope Congress will act in conformity with it in all it’s parts. the unwarrantable ideas often expressed in the newspapers, and by persons who ought to know better,...
Mr. Nathaniel Anderson , formerly of Richmond, but now of our county, informs me that he has a son settled or about to settle in Havre, in the mercantile line, whom he wishes to be made known to you, and to have the benefit of your countenance in his new establishment. Tho’ myself personally unacquainted with the son, I have long been much acquainted with the father whose merit affords a...
Yours of July 25. was recieved on the 31 st . I learn by it with extreme concern that you have in contemplation the sale of the lands here. I had ever fondly hoped for your return to our society when you should have run out your career of public usefulness. perhaps however my age should relieve me from the pain of such long prospects. the survey of mr Short’s land which you saw in my hand...
The rival propositions Objections. 1. The inaccuracies of admeasurements over hills, vallies, rivers, and, in this instance, over high mountains, the Pyrenees. 2. This gives them but 9.° or 1/10 of the quadrant. The other 9/10 they are to obtain by calculation, founded on hypothesis. 3. The length of time, the apparatus, the number of Mathematicians to be employed (to wit 6. committees of 3....
I have but a moment to inform you that the fever into which the Western mind is thrown by the affair at N. Orleans stimulated by the mercantile, & generally the federal interest, threatens to overbear our peace. in this situation we are obliged to call on you for a temporary sacrifice of yourself, to prevent this greatest of evils in the present prosperous tide of our affairs. I shall tomorrow...
I have duly rec d your favor of the 12 th inst. and concur in every sentim t you express on the subject of mine of the 2 d they were exactly what I should have said to you myself had our places been changed. my lre was meant only to convey the wishes of the party, and in few cases where circumstances have obliged me to communicate sollicitns have I ever suffered my own wishes to mingle with...
The expectation that you are always from home, prevents my writing to you with regularity; a matter of little consequence to you, as you probably receive Freneau’s paper regularly, and consequently all the news of any importance.—The fiscal party having tricked the house of representatives out of the negative vote they obtained, seem determined not to lose the ground they gained by entering...
The question presented by the letters you have sent me is the most momentous which has ever been offered to my contemplation since that of independance that made us a nation; this sets our compass, and points the course which we are to steer thro’ the ocean of time opening on our view. and never could we embark on it under circumstances more auspicious. our first and fundamental maxim should...
Our University asks a kind attention from you. you doubtless know that our legislature constituted the debt due to them from the US. into a literary fund, for the purposes of education, & that on this fund the University is established, and dependant. at their late session they authorised the Literary board to advance to the University 60,000.D. of the monies still to be recieved from the US....
A mr Arm i stead , who married a neice of our governor , who is brother to the Col o Arm i stead that defended the fort at Baltimore and of one , or two other officers of great merit lost in the service, and who
I recieved your letter just as I was going to bed last night and being to set out early this morning I have only had time to read your letters to mr Randolph & that of mr Giles. the former are exactly such as I ever believed you had written. they contain nothing unworthy of the purest virtue, & altho’ the views you entertained of the conduct of the Executive towards you were not such as any...
We are waiting for your recommendation of Commissioners of bankruptcy for Norfolk. Moses Myers & Richd. Evers Lee have been proposed by some. mr Arthur Lee has been thought of. say frankly if any of them are proper or improper. Littleton W. Tazewell if he would accept would make an excellent one: but I believe he lives in or near Williamsburg.—I propose to be at Monticello during Aug. and...
I have recieved several letters from you which have not been acknoleged. by the post I dare not, and one or two confidential opportunities have past me by surprise. I have regretted it the less, because I knew you could be more safely and fully informed by others. mr Tyler, the bearer of this, will give you a great deal more information personally than can be done by letter. four days of...
Your letters of Aug. 19. and Oct. 12. have come duly to hand. My last to you was of the 11th. of August. Soon after that date I got my right wrist dislocated, which has till now deprived me of the use of my pen: and even now I can use it but slowly and with pain. The revisal of the Congressional intelligence contained in your letters makes me regret the loss of it on your departure. I feel too...
The inclosed is the result of consideration & consultation between mr Madison & myself. if there be any thing you may think could be changed for the better, send it back , & it shall be altered. I congratulate you on the certain event of peace, whatever it’s conditions may be. health & happiness cum ceteris votis . RC ( DLC : Monroe Papers); addressed: “James Monroe Governor of Virginia...
Your favors of the 7 th & 16 th are recieved, & I now return you the Memoir inclosed in the former. I am much gratified by it’s communication because, as the plan appeared in the newspapers soon after the new Secretary at War came into office, we had given him the credit of it. every line of it is replete with wisdom; and we might lament that our tardy enlistments prevented it’s execution,...
I should have been and shall always be happy to see you at Monticello, but could not expect so much of the little time you have to prepare for your journey. I inclose you three letters, the one directed to Dr. Franklin, the other two for Mr. Jay and Mr. Adams but not directed because I really do not know the address of those two gentlemen. This you will be able to learn before you shall have...
The arbitrators, surveyor E t c met on the 21 st . they decided the line in your favor, but divided costs as a tax on you for so careless a designation of the line as to entrap a subsequent purchaser. the disputed lines were found to contain 68. acres. the costs will be 6. or 7.D. a piece to you. I inclose you the original award & the plat you inclosed to me. RC ( MWiCA : Robert Sterling Clark...
Finding subsequently, what had not been before attended to that the law had appointed the 1 st day of our Spring & Autumn District court for the stated meetings of the Visitors of the Central College , it is concluded that our meeting should be on the 5 th instead of the 6 th of May (noted in my letter of the 13 th ) and that being the 1 st day of both our County & District courts, the...
With this letter I put into the post office a very large pa cket containing all the papers respecting the Batture which I reciev ed from your office. for these papers I gave a specific receipt , sub scribed to a list of them. I had stitched them together in qui res to prevent their separation or loss in the hands of counsel . I hope mr Graham will take the trouble to examine them by my...
The inclosed letter is from a person entirely unknown to me; yet it seems to expect a confidence which prudence could give to a stranger. and as he seems to write under your authority, I take the liberty of confiding my answer to yourself directly, and of returning his paper to you. I do not know that the publication of the papers of the old Congress could be objected to, except such as might...
I see with great concern that unavoidable delays are likely still to procrastinate your negociations beyond what had been expected: & I sincerely regret the particular circumstance to which this is owing, the illness, probably the death of mr Fox. his sound judgment saw that political interest could never be separated in the long run from moral right, & his frank & great mind would have made a...