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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Monroe, James
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    • post-Madison Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Monroe, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency"
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What can I do, my dear friend, with such letters as the inclosed, but forward them to you? and the rather as I presume you must have known the merits of the writer as well as I did: that he was an active Whig and officer in the revolution of 1776. and a firm republican in that of 1800. I reject the numerous applications made to me to be troublesome to you; but now and then comes one which...
Th: J. to the President Instead of the unintelligible sketch I gave you the other day, I send it drawn more at large, mrs Monroe & yourself may take some hints from it for a better plan of your own . this supposes 10.f. in front, and 8.f in flank added to your sills. a flat of 12.f. square is formed at the top, to make your present rafters answer, & to lighten the appearance of the roof....
My friend Col o Peyton, passing thro’ Washington on a trip to the North, will pay his respects to you with this letter. he is the same for whom I have heretofore sollicited you, and still sollicit you to keep him in mind for either of the two offices in Richmond which may first become vacant. I shall hope a fortnight or three weeks previous notice of your visit to this neighborhood that I may...
I recieved last night a letter from M. Cathalan inclosing that for the Secretary of the Navy which I now forward to you. it was left open for my perusal with a request to stick a wafer in it & to forward it. the wish that I should know it’s contents, and the trouble of copying so long a dispatch are I suppose his apology for this little irregularity. it proves the intrigues of Fitch , the...
Your favor of Mar. 14. has been duly recieved. in that you ask if my letter to mr Morse may be communicated to the gentlemen of the administration and other friends. in the first place the former are entitled to it’s communication from mr Morse as named members of his society. but independantly of that, a letter addressed to a society of 6. or 8000 people is de facto made public. I had...
The inclosed answers your favor of the 29 th Ult. on the value of your lands. I had had great hopes that while in your present office you would break up the degrading practice of considering the President’s house as a general tavern, and economise sufficiently to come out of it clear of difficulties. I learn the contrary with great regret. your society during the little time I have left would...
Your favor of the 2 d was rec d on the 16 th inst. together with the herb which accompanied it, and I am much indebted for the kind interest you take in my present indisposn, as also to mr Hooe & mr Buchner for their frdly attentions. I have submitted the plant to the inspection of D r D. my physician who recognises in it what is called Agrimony, with the use of which he is not unacquainted in...
With the transmission of two of the inclosed letters I have to apologise for having torn the cover leaves from their letter leaves before I discovered they were addressed to you. this operation I invariably practise on my own letters to economise stowage, and these being with others addressed to me under a general cover were submitted to the general operation before they were read. this...
The reasons assigned in your favor of the 7 th for preferring to retain Loudon instead of Albemarle are such as cannot be controverted. the society of our children is the sovereign balm of life, and the older we grow the more we need it, to fill up the void made by the daily losses of the companions and friends of our youth. nor ought we of this neighborhood to regret a preference so conducive...
The moment, my dear friend, is come which I was so anxious should happen in your time. the office of P.M. in Richm d is become vacant by the long expected death of the incumbent, and I cannot omit to urge my former suits in behalf of Col o Peyton. in the several cases in which I have been forced to hand to you the names of sollicitants for office I never suffered my wishes to go beyond the...