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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Gallatin, Albert

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Gallatin, Albert"
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Mr. Legaux called on me this morning to ask a statement of the experiment which was made in Virginia by a Mr. Mazzei for the raising vines and making wine, and desired I would address it to you. Mr. Mazzei was an Italian and brought over with him about a dozen laborers of his own country, bound to serve him 4. or 5. years. We made up a subscription for him of £2000. sterling, and he began his...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Gallatin. This letter comes to him, as others have done, from Mr. Tronchin Minister for Geneva at Paris. Th: Jefferson will with pleasure on all occasions give a conveyance of Mr. Gallatin’s letters through the same channel, putting them into his dispatches to our Chargé des affaires at Paris. RC ( NHi : Gallatin Papers); written on address cover...
The inclosed, tho’ false and frivolous, yet requires to be answered with care. the other side of the medal requires to be shewn. we may safely admit there are talents of a certain kind on the other side; because all the talents which were venal have been bought up by the administration. Smith has refused. an offer is made to Jones. Duval has also refused & an offer is made to Kelty. health,...
Th: Jefferson asks the favor of mr & mrs Gallatin to dine with him today; and requests that while they are arranging matters at their new quarters they will dine with him every day. it may give them more time for other arrangements, and will be conferring a real favor on Th:J. RC ( NHi : Gallatin Papers); addressed: “Mr. Gallatin.”
The application of William Greetham for a Mediterranean pass for a vessel owned here, tho built abroad, being unauthorised by practice; tho’ perhaps not by law, and concerning the departments of both the State & Treasury, I ask the favor of mr Madison and mr Gallatin to give me their opinions thereon: at the same time I communicate to them what passed on the subject of passports under General...
When the war broke out which is now raging in Europe, our treaties with France, and Holland required that we should furnish to the vessels ‘belonging to the citizens of the US.’ passports in the forms prescribed by the treaties. it was very early made a question whether they should be granted to all vessels belonging to citizens of the US. or only to those built as well as belonging here. the...
The act concerning duties &c where it says that ‘the President is authorised to establish such place at or near Michillimakinac to be the port of entry,’ might have been construed to leave it discretionary in him to do it or not, had it not been followed by the imperative words ‘a collector shall be appointed.’ this seems to remove the ambiguity of the former words, and to make it a duty to...
I do not see sufficient reasons for preserving a revenue cutter at Charleston on a larger scale than elsewhere. I see no reason to expect pirates from St. Domingo, no instance of it having yet occurred. if there be any such danger, it is not peculiar to S. Carolina, but threatens all the Southern states more or less according to their situation. if such danger should become imminent it will...
Your favor of the 3d. came to hand yesterday. in it I recieved the list of warrants issued from your department as I did from the Secy. of the Navy those of his & the war department. none came from the office of state. perhaps mr Madison forgot to direct it, or mr Wagner to execute. a word from you to the latter will probably suffice. I think you expressed a wish to see weekly this...
Your favors of the 8th. & 10th. came to hand yesterday. with respect to Hopkins’s case, which is the subject of the former, my opinion is generally that when a case is exactly that which the law meant to punish, it is one for which the power of pardon was not intended. but when a case is not that which the law meant to make criminal, & yet happens to be within it’s letter, there is proper...
Your favors of the 15th. & 17th. are recieved. you will find an approbation signed at the foot of mr Millar’s letter. all the papers inclosed to me, are re-inclosed except the list of warrants.—I do not with very great certainty recollect the particulars as to Genl. Herd . but I think we at first intended him the place afterwards given to Lynn: that it was after that suggested he would accept...
Your favors of the 18th. & 24th. came by yesterday’s post. I am sorry mr Clay declines a Consulship. it would have been very pleasing to us to replace our Minister at Lisbon by such a Consul as Clay. perhaps reconsideration and enquiry into the advantages of the situation may reconcile it to him. I have not here my bundle of claims for office, & therefore cannot propose a successor for Colo....
Your favor of Aug. 29. came to hand on the 3d. but no commission for Chisman is come to hand from mr Wagner. it shall be signed as soon as recieved, as my information relative to him is favorable. I return you all the papers recieved in your last except the list of warrants. with respect to Sproat you will do what you find best. the Circular letter has my entire approbation. I have written by...
I inclose you a note, which tho’ it came unsigned, as you see it, I know by the handwriting came from Tenche Coxe. you will judge whether it contains any thing calling for attention. it was accompanied by an Aurora of Aug. 22. in which was a piece signed A Pensylvanian with numerous corrections with the pen . it is the way in which he usually made known to me the pieces he wrote. I also...
Your favors of the 7th. 12th. & 14th. inst. came to hand yesterday. consequently that of the 7th. must have slept a week somewhere. mr Davis is now with me. he has not opened himself. when he does I shall inform him that nothing is decided, nor can be till we get together at Washington. I keep all the letters of recommendn of him which you inclosed me, as also Milledge’s letter, & return you...
The inducement which you propose in order to engage Powell to bring up his accounts is approved.—so is also the idea of collecting men of talents about us, even in offices which do not need them. upon the principle of distribution also I doubt if the treasury should be given to Maryland . With respect to Doctr. Bache I must have conversation with you. as to the office of Post M. G. he might be...
I return you mr Dallas’s opinion on the question whether the goods of a citizen taken by one belligerent in the bottom of another may be recieved here, with the consent of the Captor, by the owner. his idea that, by the principle established with France, that enemy bottoms make enemy goods, these goods are assimilated to the real enemy goods which were on board, is imposing at first view; but...
I inclose you three letters from Colo. Newton of Norfolk on the subject of a successor to Wilkins at Cherrystone’s. you will [see] also & duly estimate his proposition respecting the Marine [hospital] at Norfolk.—I think we ought to do something for Campbell, and indeed must do it. the general opinion will be greatly in his favor; and even those who may find something to [censure], will still...
The appointment of mr Alger, recommended by mr Milledge, as Commr. of loans, in the room of the one who is dead, is approved. extreme reluctance to appoint a violent federalist at Cherrystone’s induces a wish to defer it as long as can be admitted in the hope of hearing of some good republican to invest with it. RC ( NHi : Gallatin Papers); addressed: “The Secretary of the Treasury.”
A very little experience will probably shew us what description of letters &c. are worth perusal for the sake of information. among yesterday’s communications the bundle of what you called public papers would hardly be worth sending me, because they contain nothing interesting but the balances in the hands of the collectors, which could be obtained by having barely a sight of the weekly sheet...
The bank statements are new to me and present curious information. to obtain a general idea I have brought them together as above , very inaccurately, omitting some items I did not understand, lumping others perhaps ill understood. but such an abstract accurately made would be interesting. for this purpose it would require in the first place a judicious form to be devised, and that sent to all...
Th: Jefferson asks the favor of mr Gallatin to examine the inclosed rough draught of what is proposed for his first communication to Congress: not merely the part relating to finance but the whole. several paragraphs are only provisionally drawn, to be altered or omitted according to further information. the whole respecting finance is predicated on a general view of the subject, presented...
The supervisor of New hampshire (Rogers) was a revolutionary tory, I am therefore ready to change him. If we are to appoint a federalist at Cherryton’s, I have no doubt that Bowdoin is preferable to any other. his family has been among the most respectable on that shore for many generations. if however we have any means of enquiry we ought to avail ourselves of them. Mr. Read’s letter I...
I omitted in my last note to you to express my approbation of what you propose as to mr Nourse. his known integrity and every other circumstance of the case make it proper. it would seem by Genl. Smith’s letter that Isaac Smith of Northampton has been invariably a whig . if so there need be no further hesitation to appoint him for Cherriton’s, and the rather as he says that Bowdoin has...
Your own opinion & that of the Atty Genl. are sufficient authorities to me to approve of prosecuting in the case of the Schooner Sally. and I will candidly add that my judgment also concurs. the handcuffs & bolts are palpable testimonials of the intention of the voyage, & the concealment of them, & their omission in the statement of the cargo, strengthens the proof. the traffic too is so...
The object of my message to the offices yesterday, was in general for such documents as were to accompany the message. those mentioned in your letter of yesterday I knew were to go afterwards, & had made the expressions future. but I did not know whether the list of offices of every kind might not be ready. however I shall express that in the future also. Your’s affectionately RC ( NHi :...
Before your papers of to-day came, I had read the report & inclosed it with a word of answer . I have gone through those last sent , rapidly as the time required. your former explanations had already prepared me for them. they are entirely satisfactory. I believe I should have taken ranker ground, by assuming a higher amount of impost to proceed on. but your’s is safest and answers all our...
The Secretary of State has sent me the list of officers named during the recess of Senate, and now to be nominated to them, among these are Josiah Hook Inspector for Penobscot as well as Collector Jonas Clark Inspector for Kennebunk M. E. Chisman Inspector for Hampton as well as Collector. Thos. Worthington Inspector of N.W. district John Oakley. Inspector as well as Collector of George town...
I inclose you a letter I recieved yesterday from mr Stone on the subject of the Wilmington collectorship. you will percieve he is in favor of Bloodworth, and counting on a personal opposition from mr Steele, confides another in the judgment you will form on your own knolege of mr Bloodworth . his letter of course must not be seen by mr Steele. if you have an opportunity of seeing mr Franklin ,...
The proceedings of the Commissioners of Washington with Maryland seem not to be accurately understood. Maryland lent them 250,000 D. of stock at par, on which they lost 15. percent. they proposed therefore that Maryland should leave Congress free to repay in stock. they did not propose, nor ever thought of, shortening the terms of paiment. Maryland agrees to recieve stock on condition it is...