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    • Gallatin, Albert

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A recent illness from which I am just recovering obliges me to borrow the pen of a grandaughter to acknolege the reciept of your welcome favour of June 29. from N. York. I read it with great satisfaction. occasional views, to be relied on, of the complicated affairs of Europe are like a good observation at sea, which tells one where they are after wandering with the newspapers till they are...
After a long silence I salute you with affection. the weight of 80. years pressing heavily on me, with a wrist & fingers almost without joints, I write as little as possible, because I do it with pain and labor. I retain however still the same affection for my friends, and especially for my antient colleagues, which I ever did, and the same wishes for their happiness. your treaty has been...
Th: Jefferson requests mr Gallatin to give a safe passage to the inclosed letters, and salutes him with constant friendship NHi : Papers of Albert Gallatin.
‘It is said to be an ill wind which blows favorably to no one.’ my ill health has long suspended the too frequent troubles I have heretofore given you with my European correspondence. to this is added a stiffening wrist, the effect of age on an antient dislocation, which renders writing slow and painful, and disables me nearly from all correspondence, and may very possibly make this the last...
Your letter of July 22 . was most acceptable to me, by the distinctness of the view it presented of the state of France . I rejoice in the prospect that that country will so soon recover from the effects of the depression under which it has been laboring; and especially I rejoice in the hope of it’s enjoying a government as free as perhaps the state of things will yet bear. it appears to me...
I avail myself as usual of the protection of your cover for my letters. that to Cathalan need only be put into the post office; but for that for Appleton I must ask the favor of you to adopt the safest court course which circumstances offer.    You will have seen by the newspapers that there is a decided ascendancy of the republican party in nearly all the states. Connecticut decidedly so: it...
I take the liberty of putting under the protection of your cover a letter to Cardinal Dugnani at Rome , in the hope that thro’ the Nuncio resident at Paris it may find a sure conveyance to him. in return for this trouble I wish I could give you any news which would interest you. but, withdrawn entirely from all attention to public affairs I neither know nor enquire what Congress are doing. you...
In a letter of the 6 th inst. I took the liberty of troubling you with a part of my annual correspondence at Paris . the remainder, not then ready, I now take the liberty of putting under your cover as a supplement to the trouble then giving given . not knowing where Baron Humboldt is I must ask the favor of you to add the necessary address. nothing new having occurred since my last, I can...
The importance that the inclosed letters should safely reach their destination impels me to avail my self of the protection of your cover. this is an inconvenience to which your situation exposes you, while it adds to the opportunities of exercising yourself in works of charity. According to the opinion I hazarded to you , a little before your departure, we have had almost an entire change in...
This will be handed to you by mr William C. Preston a young gentleman of this state, either son, or nephew (I know not which) to the gentleman of that name with whom you served in Congress about 1792. I do not know him personelly, but learn from those who do, and in whom I have confidence, that he is of excellent talents, and perfect integrity. his standing in this state is high, and he will...
The jealousy of the European governments rendering it unsafe to pass letters thro’ their post-offices, I am obliged to borrow the protection of your cover to procure a safe passage for the inclosed letter to M de de Staël , and to ask the favor of you to have it delivered at the hotel of M. De Lessert without passing thro’ the post office. In your answer of June 7. to mine of May 18 . you...
I have just recieved a request from M. de la Fayette to send him two copies of the Review of Montesquieu , published in Philadelphia about 4. or 5. years ago, and have written to Dufief to forward them under cover to you, wherever you may be, which he will know better than I can. I pray you to be the bearer of them, with the letter for him now inclosed; and, if you have never read the work,...
Your last favor is recieved just as I am setting out for a possession 90. miles Southwardly, from whence I shall not return until the first week of the ensuing month. I hasten therefore to drop you a line of Adieu. I sincerely rejoice that you are going to France . I do not think with you that nothing can be done there. Louis XVIII is a fool, & a bigot, but bating a little duplicity he is...
M r Dabney Terril , a relation of mine (the grandson of my sister) wishing to finish his education in Europe , I have advised him to go to Geneva preferably to any other place. his foundation is a moderate progress in Latin French and Mathematics. he is 17. years of age, perfectly correct in his morals and deportment, amiable in his dispositions, and thirsty after knolege. his circumstances...
A long absence from home must apologize for my so late acknolegement of your welcome favor of Sep. 6. our storm of the 4 th of that month gave me great uneasiness for you; for I was certain you must be on the coast, and your actual arrival was unknown to me. it was such a wind as I have not witnessed since the year 1769 . it did however little damage with us, only prostrating our corn, and...
M r Girardin , who will have the honor of presenting you this letter, revisits his native country after a residence of 20. years in this his country by adoption. he will consider this relation as placing him under your protection, of which he is entirely worthy. a residence of some years in my neighborhood enables me to assure you that he is a gentleman of science, of worth, and perfect...
An American going to Paris considers you of course as his natural patron there; but still it is well you should know when worth presents itself, and is added to the claim of a fellow citizen on your good offices. the bearer mr William B. Buchanan is the son of James A. Buchanan esquire of Baltimore of great worth and respectab il ity. he embarks for Europe with Doct r Eustis , and will...
This letter will be handed you by mrs Patterson , daughter of mr Patterson of Baltimore , with whose high standing worth and patriotism you are well acquainted, and probably with his person. mrs Patterson , as a citizen of the United States, would naturally recieve your patronage and attentions, while at Paris ; which with your knolege of her family would render unnecessary any recommendations...
This letter will be presented to you by mr George Ticknor , a young gentleman of Boston . he favored me with a visit here and brought high recommendations from mr Adams and others , and during a stay of several days with us, I found he merited every thing which had been said of him. he has been excellently educated, is learned, industrious eager after knolege, and as far as his stay with us...
A mr James Dinsmore of my neighborhood, a very honest & worthy man himself, is anxious that I should write to you on behalf of a brother of his who lives in the Missipi territory , and who wishes for the place of Reciever of the public monies in that territory now vacant. of the brother I know nothing personally. the one here gives me the strongest assurances of his worth, & if he is like...
You are to consider me in this letter as a witness & not a sollicitor. it is written at the request of a mr James Dinsmore who lived in my family 10. years as a housejoiner, did all the housejoinery of my house, being one of the ablest of his calling, and one of the best men I have ever known. while I lived in Washington he applied to me for a Surveyor’s place for his brother John Dinsmore in...
A book confided to me by a friend, for translation & publication has, for a twelvemonth past, kept me in correspondence with Col o Duane . he undertook to have it translated & published. the last sheets had been revised, & in a late letter to him, I pressed the printing. I soon afterwards recieved one from him informing me that it would be much retarded by embarrasments recently brought on him...
I send you three letters from mr Fitz , improperly sent to me, but as they may contain something worthy your notice, I forward them to you. I believe I have before informed you that he is as purely honest & inoffensive a man as lives, and well qualified as a Surveyor. he lived with me a year or two. his letter of latest date must have been extorted from his good nature. M rs Jones has...
Yours of the 10 th came safely to hand and laid me under new obligations for the valuable observations it contained. the error of 12 f. instead of 7. for the rise of the batture really sautoit aux yeux , and how I could have committed it at first or passed it over afterwards without discovery & having copied Pelletier’s plan myself, is unaccountable. I have adopted also most of your other...
Yours of July 14. with the welcome paper it covered, has been most thankfully recieved. I had before recieved from your office, and that of State, all the printed publications on the subject of the batture, that is to say the opinions of the Philadelphia lawyers & of E. Livingston himself, the publications of Derbigny , Thierry , Poydras , & the Pieces probantes. I had been very anxious to get...
In the action brought against me by E. Livingston on the subject of the Batture , the counsel employed desire me, without delay, to furnish them with the grounds of defence, that they may know what pleas to put in. a free communication of the papers relating to it in the public offices is necessary to aid me. I do not know whether there are any, & what papers, in your office which may be...
Not knowing whether the inclosed infor letter may give you information either new or useful, I hazard it on the bare possibility that it may. the writer both as to candor & understanding is worthy of entire credit. he is the son of a wheat-fan maker in my neighborhood, & living in the hollow of a mountain unknown to every body & with only a common education, he by some means got a copy of...
I do not know whether the request of M. Moussier , explained in the inclosed letter , is grantable or not. but my partialities in favor of whatever may promote either the useful or liberal arts, induce me to place it under your consideration, to do in it whatever is right, neither more nor less. I would then ask you to favor me with three lines in such form as I may forward him by way of...
Have you obtained the name & character of the son of Made. Bonneville? I believe there remains a single vacancy of a Cadet.   it seems extremely difficult to say what had best be done as to militia at N. London. I am assured that if I designate a militia officer there, the legislature now meeting, will immediately remove him. perhaps the proper way to ensure an effectual enforcement would be...
These recommenders are such good men that I think it will be best to make the nomination at once if the Senators & delegates know nothing to the contrary. will you be so good as to consult them? NHi : Papers of Albert Gallatin.