You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Adams, John
    • Adams, John

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Adams, John"
Results 11-20 of 299 sorted by relevance
One among our many follies Was calling in for Steaks at Dolly’s Whereby we’ve lost—& feel like Sinners That we have miss’d much better dinners Nor do we think that us ‘tis hard on Most humbly thus to beg your pardon And promise that another time We’ll give our reason not our rhime So we’ve agreed—our Nem: Con: vote is That we thus early jointly give you notice For as our rule is to be clever...
Having, according to a resolution of the House of Representatives of February 23. 1791. given in to that House a Report on the privileges and restrictions on the commerce of the United States in foreign Countries, I think it my duty to lay a Copy of it before the Senate, and have the honor of being with the most perfect respect / Sir / Your Most Obedient / and Most humble Servt. DNA : RG...
I have the honour to inclose you a Postscript to the Report on Measures, Weights & coins now before your house. this has been rendered necessary by a small arithmatical error detailed in the estimate of the cubic foot proposed in that report. the head of Superficial measures is also therein somewhat more developed. Nothing is known, since the last session of Congress of any further proceedings...
The inclosed information relative to ransom & peace with the Algerines, being newly come to hand, I take the liberty of communicating it to you, & through you to the Senate. it concurs in some facts and opinions with what we had before learnt. thro other channels, and differs in some others, so as, on the whole, to leave us still in considerable uncertainty as to interesting points. I have the...
This will be handed you by young Monsieur de Tronchin son to a gentleman of that name here who is minister for the republic of Geneva, resident at this court. the son is now in England as a traveller. he is personally unknown to me; but what I hear of him from others, together with my acquaintance with, & respect for, his father, induces me to recommend him to your notice. I do this the rather...
It is very long, my dear friend, since I have written to you. the fact is that I have was scarcely at home at all from May to September, and from that time I have been severely indisposed and not yet recovered so far as to sit up to write, but in pain. having been subject to troublesome attacks of rheumatism for some winters past, and being called by other business into the neighborhood of our...
I am to thank you, my dear Sir, for forwarding M. D’Ivernois’ book on the French revolution. I receive every thing with respect which comes from him, but it is on politics, a subject I never loved, & now hate. I will not promise therefore to read it thoroughly. I fear the oligarchical executive of the French will not do. we have always seen a small council get into cabals & quarrels, the more...
I am now to acknoledge the receipt of your favor of Jan. 25. Colo. Franks sailed in the packet of this month from Havre for New York. This arrangement of the packets opens a direct communication between Paris and America, and if we succeed as I expect we shall in getting Honfleur made a freeport, I hope to see that place become the deposit for our Whale oil, rice, tobacco and furs, and that...
I had just closed the preceding letter when M. de Blumendorf the Imperial Secretary of legation called on me with the answer to Doctr. Franklin. It was that of Sep. 28. 1784 which you remember as well as myself, wherein Count Merci informed us the Emperor was disposed to enter into commercial arrangements with us and that he would give orders to the Government of the Austrian Netherlands to...
The public papers, my dear friend, announce the fatal event of which your letter of Oct. 20. had given me ominous foreboding. tried myself, in the school of affliction, by the loss of every form of connection which can rive the human heart, I know well, and feel what you have lost, what you have suffered, are suffering, and have yet to endure. the same trials have taught me that, for ills so...