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Since mine of Jan. 14. yours of Jan. 2. and Mar. 1. have been handed to me; the former by mr Jones, whom I am glad to know on your recommendation and to make him the channel of evidencing to you how much I esteem whatever comes from you. the internal agitations of this country & the inactivity to which England is reduced by the state of imbecility in which the madness of the king has...
Encroachments being made on the Eastern limits of the United States by Settlers under the British Government, pretending that it is the Western and not the Eastern River of the Bay of Passamaquoddy which was designated by the name of St. Croix in the Treaty of Peace with that nation, I have to beg the favour of you to communicate any facts which your memory or papers may enable you to...
The Constitution having declared that the President ‘shall nominate & by & with the advice & consent of the Senate, shall appoint ambassadors other public ministers & consuls’ the President desires my opinion Whether the Senate has a right to negative the grade he may think it expedient to use in a foreign mission, as well as the person to be appointed? I think the Senate has no right to...
From a letter received from the President mr Lear is satisfied he cannot be here to-day and doubts even the possibility of his arrival tomorrow. of course our expedition of to-day would be certainly fruitless, and is therefore laid aside agreeably to a message I have received from Genl. Knox & the attorney Genl. Your’s affectionately & respectfully MHi : Adams Papers.
I have the honour to inclose you a Postscript to the Report on Measures, Weights & coins now before your house. this has been rendered necessary by a small arithmatical error detailed in the estimate of the cubic foot proposed in that report. the head of Superficial measures is also therein somewhat more developed. Nothing is known, since the last session of Congress of any further proceedings...
I have the honor to inclose you a letter from one of our captive citizens of Algiers, if I may judge from the superscription and from the letters from the same quarter which I have received myself. as these relate to a matter before your house, and contain some information we have not before had, I take the liberty of inclosing you copies of them. I have the honour to be with sentiments of the...
As the information contained in the inclosed extracts from a letter of Mr. Short’s lately arrived, has some relation to a subject now before the Senate, I have thought it my duty to communicate them, and have the honor to be with sentiments of the most profound respect and attachment. / Sir / Your most obedient and / most humble Servant: DLC : Papers of Thomas Jefferson.
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to the Vice-president of the U. S. and has the honor to inclose him the copy of a letter from the President, just now received. MHi : Adams Papers.
I have a dozen times taken up my pen to write to you & as often laid it down again, suspended between opposing considerations. I determine however to write from a conviction that truth, between candid minds can never do harm. the first of Paine’s pamphlets on the Rights of man, which came to hand here, belonged to mr Beckley. he lent it to mr Madison who lent it to me; and while I was reading...
I received some time ago your favor of July 29. and was happy to find that you saw in it’s true point of view the way in which I had been drawn into the scene which must have been so disagreeable to you. the importance which you still seem to allow to my note, & the effect you suppose it to have had tho unintentional in me, induce me to shew you that it really had no effect. Paine’s pamphlet,...
I have now the honour to inclose you a Report on the petition of John Mangnall, and of expressing to you the sentiments of perfect esteem & respect with which I am Sir— / Your most obedient / & most humble sert DNA : RG 46—Records of the U.S. Senate.
Supposing that the first Consular convention agreed on with France, and not ratified by Congress, may explain as well as account for some articles in that which was last agreed on & ratified. I take the liberty of inclosing, for the members of the Senate, copies of the two conventions as they were printed side by side, to shew where they differed. These differences are not as great as were to...
The inclosed information relative to ransom & peace with the Algerines, being newly come to hand, I take the liberty of communicating it to you, & through you to the Senate. it concurs in some facts and opinions with what we had before learnt. thro other channels, and differs in some others, so as, on the whole, to leave us still in considerable uncertainty as to interesting points. I have the...
In consequence of the information I received from you on the first Wednesday in January that the list of votes for President & Vice President were received at the seat of government from all the states except that of Kentucky, I sent a special messenger to the District judge of Kentucky for the list of the votes of that state lodged in his custody, and by the return of the messenger received...
Having, according to a resolution of the House of Representatives of February 23. 1791. given in to that House a Report on the privileges and restrictions on the commerce of the United States in foreign Countries, I think it my duty to lay a Copy of it before the Senate, and have the honor of being with the most perfect respect / Sir / Your Most Obedient / and Most humble Servt. DNA : RG...
I am to thank you for the book you were so good as to transmit me, as well as the letter covering it, and your felicitations on my present quiet. the difference of my present & past situation is such as to leave me nothing to regret but that my retirement has been postponed four years too long. The principles on which I calculate the value of life are entirely in favor of my present course. I...
The time which has intervened between the receipt of your favor, covering D’Ivernois’ letter, and this answer, needs apology, but this will be found in the state of the case. I had received from him a letter similar to that you inclosed. as the adoption of his plan depended on our legislature, and it was then in session, I immediately inclosed it to a member with a request that he would sound...
I inclose you a letter from our friend D’Ivernois according to his request expressed in it. our geographical distance is insensible still to foreigners as they consider America of the size of a garden of which Massachusetts is one square & Virginia another. I know not what may have been your sentiments or measures respecting the transplantation of the science of Geneva to this country. if not...
I am to thank you, my dear Sir, for forwarding M. D’Ivernois’ book on the French revolution. I receive every thing with respect which comes from him, but it is on politics, a subject I never loved, & now hate. I will not promise therefore to read it thoroughly. I fear the oligarchical executive of the French will not do. we have always seen a small council get into cabals & quarrels, the more...
The public and the public papers have been much occupied lately, in placing us in point of opposition to each other. I trust with confidence that less of it has been felt by ourselves personally. In the retired canton where I am, I learn little of what is passing: pamphlets I see never: papers but a few; and the fewer the happier. Our latest intelligence from Philadelphia at present is of the...
I am honoured with your favor of June 19. informing me that permission is given me to make a short visit to my native country, for which indulgence I beg leave to return my thanks to the President, and to yourself, Sir, for the expedition with which you were so good as to forward it after it was obtained. Being advised that October is the best month of the autumn for a passage to America, I...
New York, April 29, 1790. Requests “two hundred and fifty dollars for the contingent expences of the Office of Secretary of State.” LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
Mr. Jefferson presents his compliments to the Secretary of the Treasury, and asks his perusal of the inclosed rough draught of a report on the subject of measures, weights & coins, in hopes that the Secretary of the Treasury may be able to accomodate his plan of a mint to the very small alteration of the money unit proposed in this report. As soon as the Secretary of the Treasury shall have...
I have the honor to enclose you an estimate of the probable expences of the Department of State for one year from the 1st. day of April last past, not including the diplomatic establishment abroad, for which there is a Bill before Congress to make a special appropriation. I have given directions that a list shall always be sent to your office of all Commissions to be made out for persons...
You were so kind as to say you would write to our bankers in Holland to answer my draught for a part of the balance due me for salary etc. I suppose in fact it will be necessary to clear their minds on the subject, for tho’ they know that the diplomatic expences in Europe were paid on the funds in their hands, yet as I am here they will naturally expect your instructions should accompany my...
Colonel Humphreys will be entitled to draw from the Treasury of the United States from about this date till further order, at the rate of two thousand two hundred and fifty dollars, a year, and in addition to this sum for postage of letters, the amount of which cannot be known beforehand, and will not be considerable. This is to be charged to the fund of the foreign department. I must ask the...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to the Secretary of the Treasury, and incloses him a note from mr Droz, the coiner, which he forgot to deliver to him to-day when he had the honour of waiting on him. It came to hand yesterday. ALS , letterpress copy, Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress. For Jean Pierre Droz, see H to Jefferson, April 22, 1790 .
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to the Secretary of the treasury, and his condolences on the accident of the other evening, which he hopes has produced no serious loss. He incloses to the Secretary of the Treasury a report of a committee of the National assembly of France, on the subject of Billon, containing more particular information as to that species of coin than he had...
I inclose you copies of the printed papers you desired: also a letter I recieved last night. This paper I will thank you to return by the bearer when you shall have perused it, as it is yet to be translated & communicated to the President. It is evident that this matter will become serious, & tho’ I am pointedly against admitting the French construction of the Treaty, yet I think it essential...
I return you the report on the mint which I have read over with a great deal of satisfaction. I concur with you in thinking that the mint must stand on both metals, that the alloy should be the same in both, also in the proportion you establish between the value of the two metals. As to the question on whom the expense of coinage is to fall, I have been so little able to make up an opinion...
[ Philadelphia, February 11, 1791. Letter not found. ] Letter listed in Jefferson’s record of letters written and received, Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress.
The President has thought proper to appoint Colo. David Humphreys, minister Resident for the U.S. at the court of Lisbon, with a salary of 4500. dollars a year, and an outfit equal to a year’s salary. Besides this, by a standing regulation, he will be allowed his disbursements for gazettes transmitted here, translating & printing papers where that shall be necessary, postage, couriers, &...
The publication of the laws of the U.S. and the purchase of those of the several states call on us immediately for about five hundred dollars, for which sum I must ask a warrant from you to be accounted for. The contingent expenses of my department to the 1st. inst. are now stated and will be settled with the Auditor tomorrow. I have the honor to be with great esteem & respect   Sir Your most...
Th. Jefferson has the honor to send to the Secretary of the Treasury a note just received from Mr. Otto with copies of a correspondence between certain bankers desirous of lending 40 millions of livres to the U.S. the French ministers & mr Short. He will ask the Secretary of the Treasury’s consideration of these papers, & that he will be so good as to return them to him with the substance of...
Your favour of the 8th. inst. could only be recieved on my return here, and I have this morning been considering of it’s contents. I think with you that it will be interesting to recieve from different countries the details it enumerates. Some of these I am already in a regular course of recieving. Others when once well executed, will scarcely need to be repeated. As to these I already possess...
Aug. 13. 1791. Notes of a conversn between A. Hamilton & Th: J. Th. J. mentioned to him a lre recd. from J. A. disavowing Publicola, & denying that he ever entertd. a wish to bring this country under a hereditary executive, or introduce an hereditary branch of legislature &c. See his lre. A. H. condemning mr A’s writings & most particularly Davila, as having a tendency to weaken the present...
At a meeting of the Commissioners of the Sinking Fund of the United States, on the 15th day of August, 1791: Present: The Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, and the Attorney General. The Secretary of the Treasury having informed the Board, that a further sum, amounting, probably to between three and four hundred thousand dollars, may be applied, in pursuance of the act...
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to the Secretary of the Treasury and incloses him the proposed letter to the Minister of France, in which however he shall be glad to make any modifications of expression to accomodate it more perfectly to the ideas of the Secretary of the Treasury. It will be necessary to shew it in it’s ultimate form to the President before it be sent. AL ,...
Th. Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to the Secretary of the treasury and incloses him the copy of a letter and table which he has addressed to the President of the United States, and which being on a subject whereon the Secretary of the Treasury and Th: J. have differed in opinion, he thinks it his duty to communicate to him. AL , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. Jefferson’s...
In answer to your favor of the 13th. I have the honor to inform you that the papers delivered to me on the subject of the Register of the sloop Polly detained on her being sold at Port au-prince, were put into the hands of mr Bourne the Consul for the U.S. in St Domingo, & that he, being now returned from thence, says that he applied several times on the subject to the Governor of the island,...
Philadelphia, January 24, 1792. “In consequence of the act of Congress appropriating 40,000 Dollars per annum from July 1. 1790. for our intercourse with foreign nations, I received from the Treasurer a bill, the last spring, on our bankers in Amsterdam for 99,000 florins. As this will be nearly exhausted by this time, and there will be large calls immediately by Mr. Morris, Mr. Pinkney & mr...
It is perfectly equal to me that the 1233⅓ dollars mentioned in your letter of yesterday, be taken out of the 40,000 Dollars now desired, or not. You will observe that the two sums of 40,000 D. each are for the interval between July 1. 1790. & July 1. 1792. and that the act is to continue, even if not renewed, till the end of the next session of Congress, probably the beginning of March 1793....
From your letter in answer to mine of the and your declarations in conversation with Mr. Lear it is understood that you absoultely decline acting under the authority of the present Commissioners. If this understanding of your meaning be right I am instructed by the President to inform you that notwithstanding the desire he has entertained to preserve your agency in the business the condition...
The last grant of money for defraying the contingent and other expences of the Department of State having been laid out, and the account thereof and vouchers presented at the Auditor’s office for settlement and settled, I have to request the favour of your directing a warrant for the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars to be issued for the payment of such expences as may arise in future. I...
Permit me to request the favor of you, to cause a warrant to be issued on the Treasurer of the United States payable to George Taylor Junr. to the amount of five hundred dollars, for defraying the contingent expenses of the department of State. I have the honor to be with sentiments of the highest respect and esteem &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. Taylor was...
In consequence of letters received from mr William Short on the subject of his property invested in the public funds, I am to desire that no transfer may be permitted of any stock standing in his own name, or in the name of any other for his use. I have the honor to be with perfect esteem & respect   Sir   Your most obedient & most humble sert. ALS , letterpress copy, Massachusetts Historical...
[ Philadelphia ] May 30, 1792. “Th: Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to the Secretary of the Treasury, and sends him the above extract at the request of mr Short who, being unwell, wrote only a few lines to Th: J.” AL , letterpress copy, Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress; LC , RG 59, Diplomatic and Consular Instructions of the Department of State, 1791–1801, National...
I have the honor to inclose you the answer of the Minister of France to the letter I wrote him on the subject of the complaint of the Collector of Bermuda hundred against the French Consul at Norfolk, whereby you will see that he undertakes to have the latter set right. I have not thought it necessary to reply to his observation that “Le Consul de Norfolk est sans doute obligé de maintenir les...
By an act of Congress passed on the last day of their session it was made the duty of the Secretary of state to have seals prepared for the courts of the two Western governments, but nothing particular was said as to the resource for making payment for them. I have therefore to ask the favor of information from you whether there are any funds which you should think it justifiable to apply to...
Philadelphia, July 13, 1792. “Permit me to request the favor of you to cause a warrant to be issued on the Treasurer of the United States payable to George Taylor Junior to the amount of five hundred and twenty dollars for defraying the contingent expences of the Department of State.” Letterpress copy, Thomas Jefferson Papers, Library of Congress; LC , Papers of the Continental Congress,...