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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Hammond, George
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    • Washington Presidency

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Hammond, George" AND Period="Washington Presidency"
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On the receipt of your letter of the 14th. of December I communicated it to the President of the United States, and under the sanction of his authority the principal members of the executive department made it their duty to make known in conversations, generally, the explicit disclaimer, in the name of your court, which you had been pleased to give us, that the Government of Canada had...
I have now the honor to inclose you the answer of the Attorney General to a letter I wrote him on the subject of your’s of the 18th. inst. It appears that the Judges of the supreme court of the United states are open to the application of Mr. Pagan for a writ of error to revise his case. This writ is to be granted indeed or refused at the discretion of the judge; but the discretion of a judge...
A constant course of business has as yet put it out of my power to prepare an answer to your letter of the 5th. instant. In the mean time I have been taking measures to procure copies of the several acts therein complained of, that I might save you the trouble of producing proofs of them. My endeavors have failed in the instances below cited, of which therefore I am constrained to ask you to...
I received yesterday your favor of the day before, and immediately laid it before the President of the U.S. and I have it in charge from him to express to you the perfect satisfaction which these assurances on the part of your court have given him that Bowles, who is the subject of them, is an unauthorised impostor. The promptitude of their disavowal of what their candour had forbidden him to...
I am this moment favored with the letter you did me the honor of writing yesterday, covering the extract of a British statute forbidding the admission of foreign vessels into any ports of the British dominions with goods or commodities of the growth production or manufacture of America. The effect of this appears to me so extensive as to induce a doubt whether I understand rightly the...
The Secretary of state presents his compliments to Mr. Hammond, and incloses him the draught of a letter to the President of the U.S. which he has prepared to accompany Mr. Hammond’s communication of the 11th. and letter of the 12th. The whole will probably be laid by the President before the legislature, and perhaps communicated to the public in order to let the merchants know that they need...
Your favor of March 5. has been longer unanswered than consisted with my wishes to forward as much as possible explanations of the several matters it contained. But these matters were very various and the evidence of them not easily to be obtained, even where it could be obtained at all. It has been a work of time and trouble to collect from the different States, all the acts themselves, of...
Mr. Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to Mr. Hammond: after receiving his letter of this morning he had called on Mr. Hammond to speak with him on the subject of it, according to the desire he had before expressed to him, that when once each party should have explained fully the ground on which they view the matters in difference between them, they might shorten by oral...
Mr. Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Hammond and requests for half after three tomorrow his company to a solo dinner, if no engagement shall happen to stand in his way. PrC ( DNA : RG 59, NL ). Not recorded in SJL .
Th: Jefferson presents his respectful compliments to Mr. Hammond: he had not heard of the adjournment of the circuit court at Richmond without deciding the case of Jones v. Walker, and therefore cannot say with certainty why it was not decided. He had been before informed through a private channel that but two of the three judges were arrived in Richmond, and that it would not be decided but...