Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Period="Madison Presidency"
Results 51-60 of 2,706 sorted by date (ascending)
Returning to the scenes of my birth & early life, to the society of those with whom I was raised, & who have been ever dear to me, I recieve, fellow citizens & neighbors, with inexpressible pleasure, the cordial welcome you are so good as to give me. long absent on duties which the history of a wonderful aera made incumbent on those called to them, the pomp, the turmoil, the bustle & splendour...
Your friendly note of Mar. 3. was delivered to me on that day. you know the pressure of the last moments of a session of Congress , and can judge of that of my own departure from Washington , & of my first attentions here. this must excuse my late acknolegement of your note.—the assurances of your approbation of the course I have observed are highly flattering, & the more so, as you have been...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr. Colvin and having recieved but two of his Monitors since left Washington on the 11 th of Mar. he ascribes it to his having failed to give mr Colvin his address which is at Monticello near Milton . the post for Milton leaves Washington on
It is with great regret that I write you a letter which I am sure must give you pain, but your interest as well as my own makes it my duty, & yours is still more urgent than mine. I have little doubt that your sons write you flattering accounts of their proceedings & prospects at the Shadwell mills , & it is possible they may flatter themselves with retrieving their affairs, but however I...
Your favor of Feb. 27. came to hand on the 3 d of March . the occupations of the moment & of those which have followed must be my apology for this late acknolegement. the plan of civilising the Indians is undoubtedly a great improvement on the antient & totally ineffectual one of beginning with religious missionaries. our experience has shewn that this must be the last step of the process. the...
I recieve with respect & gratitude, from the legislature of New York , on my retirement from the office of Chief magistrate of the United States , the assurances of their esteem, & of their satisfaction with the services I have endeavored to render. the welfare of my fellow citizens, & the perpetuation of our republican institutions having been the governing principles of my public life, the...
I thank you, my friends & neighbors, for your kind congratulations on my return to my native home, & on the opportunities it will give me of enjoying, amidst your affections the comforts of retirement & rest. your approbation of my conduct is the more valued as you have best known me, & is an ample reward for any services I may have rendered. we have acted together from the origin to the end...
I recieved on the 6 th inst. your favor covering the resolutions of the General meeting of the republicans of the state of Connecticut who had been convened at Hartford : and I see with pleasure the spirit they breathe. they express with truth the wrongs we have sustained, the forbearance we have exercised, & the duty of rallying round the constituted authorities, for the protection of our...
I have recieved, fellow citizens, your farewell address with those sentiments of respect and satisfaction which it’s very friendly terms are calculated to inspire. with the consciousness of having endeavored to serve my fellow citizens according to their best interests, these testimonies of their good will are the sole & highest remuneration my heart has ever desired. I am sensible of the...
Your letter of Mar. 24. has been duly recieved, and finds me disposed to render you any service within the line of propriety or right. my connection by blood gives me a certain claim on the affections of mr S. Carr , but none at all over his actions or proceedings with others: and no one, more unwillingly than myself, intermeddles with the affairs of others. mr Carr ’s known integrity will...