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A little before the reciept of your favor of Feb. 25. the inclosed letter had come to my hands, and not knowing your residence I had forwarded it to judge Stuart at Staunton with a request that he would enquire for you & send it. as soon as I recieved yours of Feb. I wrote to mr Stuart to return the other letter to me. his absence from home delayed my recieving it, & my answering your letter...
I am now entered on my 69 th year. the tables of mortality tell me I have 7. years to live. my bibliomany has possessed me of perhaps 20,000. volumes. of these there are probably 1000. which I would read, of choice, before I should the historical, genealogical, chronological, & geographical Atlas of M. Le Sage . but it is also probable I shall decamp before I get through 50. of them. why then...
I left in the President’s house a print of the Diocletian palace a drawing of the Capitol on that plan, & one by mr Latrobe on a plan of his, & mentioned to the President that I would be glad to recieve them when Congress had decided whether to prosecute either or not. they hung in the room then used as a setting room. either yourself or mr Isaac Coles informed me, more than a year ago, they...
The inclosed account , having been accidentally mislaid, remained unattended to till I lately happened to lay my hand on it. having to remit a small sum to mr Foxall of Geo.town I joined the amount of this to his. calling to make the paiment to mr Rapine , he informed him I had paid the account in Feb. 1808. I find in fact that I paid him 12.D. on the 8 th of Feb. 1808. but as I observe the...
We are, four of us, sportsmen, in my family, amusing ourselves much with our guns. but the powder sold here is wretched, carrying the index of the French eprouvette (such as you furnished Gen l Dearborne ) to 9. 10. or 11. only, while the cannister of your powder, recieved from you 2. or 3. years ago, carried it to considerably upwards of 20. I have persuaded a merchant in this neighborhood to...
A book confided to me by a friend, for translation & publication has, for a twelvemonth past, kept me in correspondence with Col o Duane . he undertook to have it translated & published. the last sheets had been revised, & in a late letter to him, I pressed the printing. I soon afterwards recieved one from him informing me that it would be much retarded by embarrasments recently brought on him...
Yours of the 19 th is recieved. I have carefully examined my letter files from July 1808. to this day, & find among them no such anonymous letter as you mention. indeed the strong impression on my memory is that I never recieved an Anonymous letter from England , or from any other country than our own. Certain newspapers are taking a turn which gives me uneasiness. before I was aware of it, I...
When I wrote you my letter of Mar. 28. I had great confidence that as much at least could have been done for you as I therein supposed. the friend to whom I confided the business here, and who was and is zealous, had found such readiness, in those to whom he spoke, as left no other difficulty than to find the bank responsible. but the Auroras which came on while this was in transaction,...
I have learnt, with sincere concern, the circumstances which have taken place at Washington . some intimations had been quoted from federal papers, which I had supposed false, as usual. their first confirmation to me was from the National Intelligencer. still my hopes and confidence were that your retirement was purely a matter of choice on your part. a letter I have recieved from mr Hollins...
I have recieved your favor of the 15 th . you are right as to my omission of the supply of iron in 1810. I must explain this for my own justification. when I sat down to make a statement, by memory, of the paiments to which my produce now getting to market was to be applied, I noted your debt as about 600.D. which was the general impression of it on my mind. turning afterwards to our letters,...
I have rejoiced to see Ritchie declare himself in favor of the President on the late attack against him, and wish he may do the same as to mr Gallatin . I am sure he would if his information was full. I have not an intimacy with him which might justify my writing to him directly, but the inclosed letter to you is put into such a form as might be shewn to him, if you think proper to do so....
The interest you were so kind as to take, at my request, in the case of Duane , and the communication to you of my first letter to him, entitles you to a communication of the 2 d which will probably be the last. I have ventured to quote your letter in it, without giving your name, & even softening some of it’s expressions respecting him. it is possible Duane may be reclaimed as to mr Madison ....
I thank you for the care you have taken of my friend Thouin’s letter which I have safely recieved, and especially of the box of seeds. with respect to the last I am obliged to request the further trouble of putting them into one of the stages for Philadelphia addressed to mr Bernard M c Mahon , gardener of that place, who will recieve & take care of them & pay the stage transportation. no...
My old friend Thouin , Director of the National garden of France has just sent me a fresh parcel of seeds which he thus describes . ‘they consist of about 200. species, foreign to N. America , selected from among 1. the large trees, the wood of which is useful in the arts. 2. small trees & shrubs, ornamental for shrubberies. 3. plants vivacious & picturesque. 4. flowers for parterres. 5....
I have duly recieved your favor of Apr. 23 d & with it a certificate by which it appears that the papers of the Executive office of Virga during the first year of my administration as Governor are lost, and particularly a letter of mine to you of Nov. 6. 1779. I am really sorry it is not in my power, by memory, to say what were the contents of that letter, of which I do not retain the smallest...
Your favor of Apr. 17. came duly to hand. nobody has regretted more sincerely than myself, the incidents which have happened at Washington . the early intimations, which I saw quoted from federal papers, were disregarded by me, because falshood is their element. the first confirmation was from the National Intelligencer, soon followed by the exultations of other papers whose havoc is on the...
Your favor on your departure from Richmond came to hand in due time. altho’ I may not have been among the first, I am certainly with the sincerest who congratulate you on your reentrance into the public National councils. your value there has never been unduly estimated by those whom personal feelings did not misguide. the late misunderstandings at Washington have been a subject of real...
I duly recieved your favor of Apr. 19. and the check which it covered on the bank of Columbia , which I have sent on to Mess rs Conrads of Philadelphia , to whom perhaps it was due, for I think it was due to somebody. in my letter to you, I forgot to ask whether you had ever made the Swedish stoves of which I gave you the model sent me by the Earl of Buchan . I have so high an opinion of them,...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mess rs Edward Parker & Joseph Delaplaine, and his thanks for the communication of their prospectus for reprinting the Edinburgh Encyclopaedia. possessing already every Encyclopedia which has been published in France , Great Britain & America , & a library moreover vastly beyond his present wants, he has for some time ceased to make additions to it, &...
Immediately on the reciept of your letter , I desired mr Bacon to be on the lookout for Hubbard , and to apprise the Patroles of him & to inform them of the reward you had offered which I would advance for you. I moreover engaged a trusty negro man of my own, and promised him a reward on my own account if he could inform us so that he should be taken. he has not been heard of. yet I have no...
Since the packet with which I troubled you on the 16 th of April , I have recieved the inclosed letter from for Gen l Kosciuszko ; it is from mr Barnes , his agent here, covering a remittance of £200. sterling to the General on account of interest arising on his money in our funds & banks. I cannot avoid solliciting your care of it, knowing it’s importance to the comfort of the General . it...
I have duly recieved your favor of Apr. 23. M r Shoemaker’s lease of the Shadwell mills does not expire till this day twelvemonth. in the mean time however he has sold the residue of it, after the present month to a mr M c Kenny of Culpeper . no renewal of the lease will probably take place till towards the close of the present term. I am Sir PoC ( MHi ); at foot of text: “M
Your favor of Mar. 4. is at hand. I have recieved no letter from your son Richard since my last communication to you , altho I have no doubt the letters I forwarded to him went safely to him, as I got the Secretary of state to inclose them in his own dispatches to the Agent of the US. in Jamaica . the difficulty of getting letters from thence by private conveyances, and the numbers which...
I duly recieved your favor of Mar. 28. with the copy of the oration it covered. accept my thanks for this communication, and still more for the favorable sentiments expressed in it as well as in your letter. the approbation of those who are faithful to the interests of their country, and especially to it’s self-government & independance, is highly acceptable to me, and nothing more soothing...
Your favor of Nov. 4. 09. did not get to my hands till a twelvemonth after it’s date. be pleased to accept my thanks for the publication you were pleased to send me. that for D r Barton I forwarded to him. his researches into the Indian languages of our continent being continued, I hope it will be in his power to make to you communications useful to the object you are pursuing. this will...
I duly recieved your favor of Mar. 1. with the map it covered, for which be pleased to accept my thanks. every information of that country is acceptable as we know much less of it than either our duties or interests require. mr Crofts , mentioned in your letter, probably passed on some other way, as I had not the pleasure of seeing him. not being a subscriber for the Louisiana gazette, it is...
Th: Jefferson salutes mr Graham with friendship & respect and prays him to give the benefit of the cover of his office to the inclosed letters to S t Petersburg , by the first conveyance he shall deem safe. not knowing where mr Warden is at present he has taken the liberty of inclosing a letter for him & of praying mr Graham to superscribe the proper post-office, & commit it to that line, for...
I have written you a long letter by mr Barlow , & in that inclosed you one from mr Barnes covering a bill of exchange for £200. sterling. referring to that for all other things, the object of the present is merely to inclose the second of the same bill of exchange, and to get it put under cover of the Secretary of State’s dispatches. I shall seek a third opportunity of sending the third, or...
The demand of Frances Hornsby for her portion of the lands of her father conveyed to you by James L. Henderson is now become so serious as to require us to proceed immediately against James L . and in the mean time to aim at some compromise with mr Hornsby . I yesterday conversed with Cap t Meriwether , attorney for Hornsby
I have recieved your letter of Aug. 19. & with it the volume of Chronology you were so kind as to send me, for which be pleased to accept my thanks. it presents a happy combination of spar sparse and unconnected facts, which brought together & fitted to each other, forms a whole of symmetry, as well as of system. it is as a gleam of light flashed over the dark abyss of times past. nothing...
Th: Jefferson salutes mr Warden with esteem & respect and prays him to take charge of the inclosed for Gen. Kosciusko . it covers the 2 d of a bill of exchange, the 1 st of which is remitted him through mr Barlow , to multiply the chances of one of them getting safe to him through the accidents impending by sea & land. he repeats his wishes for a pleasant voyage to mr Warden. PoC ( DLC );...
Yours of April 11 . was recieved in due time; but as you expressed a wish that your lands should be offered to mr Bankhead & he was gone on a visit to his father & family at Portroyal , I awaited his return. I knew indeed that he had just made a purchase for himself, of the land which was Col o N. Lewis’s , extending from Charlottesville to Monticello
Charge Craven Peyton £19–10 for fire & coal wood accounted for to him by Reuben Grady settled between them May 19. 1811 . MS ( MHi ); entirely in TJ’s hand; written on a small scrap, part of a reused address cover to TJ; endorsed by TJ: “Peyton Craven.” reuben grady paid TJ for the right to cut firewood at Milton and occasionally sold him charcoal ( MB James A. Bear Jr. and Lucia C. Stanton,...
I recieved yesterday your favor of the 16 th inst. & by this day’s post I inclose it to the Secretary of state , for his information and that of the Secretary of the Treasury . I suppose it probable they will avail themselves of your kind offer, to get dispatches to France should they have present occasion. I avail myself of this opportunity of renewing to you the assurances of my respect PoC...
I inclose a letter from a M r John Dortic , who being bound to France shortly and to return again, wishes to be the bearer of any dispatches the government may have for that country. of this person I know nothing more than that he brought me lately a packet of seeds from M. Thouin Director of the National garden of France , which he very kindly notified me of from N.Y. and afterwards forwarded...
I have just recieved a copy of the Modern Griselda which Ellen tells me will not be unacceptable to you. I therefore inclose it. the heroine presents herself certainly as a perfect model of ingenious perverseness, & of the art of making herself and others unhappy. if it can be made of use in inculcating the virtues and felicities of life, it must be by the rule of contraries. nothing new has...
As I sent you my first effort to keep Duane right, so I communicate the second , which the failure of our efforts measures to help him obliged me to write. it probably closes our correspondence as I have not heard a word from him on the subject. Ritchie is correct as to the administration generally. I have written to a friend there what I am in hopes will put him right as to mr Gallatin ,...
I have lately recieved a copy of mrs Edgeworth’s Moral ta le s, which seeming better suited to your years than to mine, I inclose you the first volume. the other two shall follow as soon as your Mama has read them. they are to make a part of your library. I have not looked into them, preferring to recieve their character from you after you shall have read them. your family of silk worms is...
Our cultivation of Benni has not yet had entire success. the 1 st year we sowed late & the frost caught it, so that we had scarcely seed the 2 d year to raise seed for the 3 d . we have at length made in the neighborhood two or three bushels. I succeeded in expressing the oil in the iron press you saw at Foxall’s . but the iron giving a brown tinge to the oil, altho transparent & free from...
Mess rs Shoemakers in Account with Th: Jefferson on a contract for offal I was, by agreement, to have the offal of my crop of wheat at 2/6 for every barrel of flour, or every 5. bushels of wheat, which is 50/ for every hundred bushels of wheat. I delivered 2047 bush.–55 ℔ the usual allowance of offal for 100. bushels of wheat, is 6. bushels of Midlings, 12 bushels of shipstuff , & 30. bushels...
Mess rs Shoemaker in Account with Th: Jefferson D r Cr 1811. Jan. 15. To balance by settlement of this day 490.58 2 Feb. By order on Underhill 250.
I have just recieved a letter from mr Short authorising me to sell his lands in our neighborhood, and particularly desiring me to offer them to yourself and D r Bankhead . the I think it an excellent tract and well worth 12. Dollars. the times of paiment will be made entirely easy on paiment of interest. should D r Bankhead fulfill our wishes in providing himself a retreat here, I do not think...
M r Rives gives me reason to hope you meditate a visit to us in a few days, and he thought it might have happened yesterday. as I shall set out for Bedford about the last of the week, and am unwilling to lose the pleasure of your visit, I mention my meditated journey, in the hope it will bring you the sooner. I am the more interested in it as you were so kind as to say you would come over in...
I recieved yesterday yours of the 6 th informing me of the sale of part of my flour at my lowest limit of 9.D. you must be so good as to consider that limit as removed. it was originally proposed at a season when I was satisfied the market must come to that notwithstanding momentary depressions. but the season is now arrived when the approach of harvest must necessarily lower the demand &...
Your favor of Mar. 22. came to hand on the 28 th of April, and the delay of an answer has proceeded f rom the circumstance of mr & mrs Logwood’s residence in another county. I now inclose you the documents which your letter called for. from an expression in the powers of Attorney, that ‘the monies were to be paid into your hands for my use’ it might be inferred that I was interested in this...
I have lately recieved a letter from Mons r Beauvois of Paris , a literary friend & acquaintance of mine, who passed several years in the US. of which letter I give an extract on the next leaf. I am anxious to serve him in the case there stated, but find it necessary first to obtain correct information of the facts and transactions which have taken place in the case in this country, and the...
Extract of a letter from M. Palisot de Beauvois to Th: Jefferson dated Paris Mar. 19. 1811. ‘ Mons r and Mad e Ruelle in 1789. purchased a plantation in the county of New Kent , and lived on it about 10. years. returning then to France , they conveyed their rights to Peter Piernetz , the brother of Madame Ruelle
We yesterday got up the wooden frame of our Pier-head compleat, and this morning mr Salmonds begins the stone-work. he will get to the spring of the arch this evening, or tomorrow morning before you can reach this from mr Madison’s . I must pray you therefore to be with us tomorrow forenoon, the earlier the better. on arriving at the Pier head you will find your attendants on the spot, the...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Peter Minor and sends him a bottle of oil of the last expression, in the wooden press placed under the beam of the cyder press. it’s colour shews it preferable to the Iron press; and the ease with which this press is made is a further encoragement to the culture of the Benni. Th:J. will not make seed this year, owing to his having sowed it with a...
I have been longer than I had hoped in getting my produce to market & sold. it now enables me to inclose you a draught on Mess rs Gibson & Jefferson of Richmond for fifty nine dollars 74. Cents, the balance due according to the statement in my letter of Apr. 4. & your answer . I inclose you D r Everett’s account for his attendance on the negro man