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Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Genl. Dearborn to Colo. Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. These orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the officer commanding at...
Memoranda for the President. Information having been recieved in October last that many intruders had settled on the lands of the Cherokees & Chickasaws; the letter from Gen l Dearborn to Col o Meigs was written to have them ordered off, & to inform them they would be removed by military force in the spring if still on the lands. these orders remain still to be given, & they should go to the...
On opening my letters from France in the moment of my departure from Washington, I found from their signatures that they were all from literary characters except one from mr. Short, which mentioned in the outset that it was private, & that his public communications were in the letter to the Secretary of State, which I sent you. I find however on reading his letter to me (which I did not do...
On opening my letters from France in the moment of my departure from Washington , I found from their signatures that they were all from literary characters except one from mr Short , which mentioned in the outset that it was private, & that his public communications were in the letter to the Secretary of State , which I sent you. I find however on reading his letter to me (which I did not do...
I inclose you several letters which must have been intended for the office, & not the person named on the back. They belong therefore to your files, and I will pray you particularly as to those asking office on this & all other occasions to consider me merely as the channel of conveyance, & not as meaning to add an atom of weight to the sollicitations they convey—unless indeed I know any thing...
I inclose you several letters which must have been intended for the office, & not the person named on the back. they belong therefore to your files, and I will pray you particularly as to those asking office on this & all other occasions to consider me merely as the channel of conveyance, & not as meaning to add an atom of weight to the sollicitations they convey. unless indeed I know any...
Yours of the 19th. came to hand by the last post; but that allows us so little time that I could not answer by it’s return. I had not before heard of mr. Latrobe’s claim of Lenthall’s salary in addition to his own. That some of Lenthall’s duties must have fallen on him I have no doubt; but that he could have performed them all in addition to his own so as to entitle himself to his whole...
Yours of the 19 th came to hand by the last post; but that allows us so little time that I could not answer by it’s return. I had not before heard of mr Latrobe’s claim of Lenthall’s salary in addition to his own. that some of Lenthall’s duties must have fallen on him I have no doubt; but that he could have performed them all in addition to his own so as to entitle himself to his whole salary,...
Since my letter of yesterday I have recieved yours of the 27th. & 28th. and in the former the 500. D. for mrs. Trist. The bronze time piece mentioned will run a fortnight, but I found it better to wind it up once a week, as during the 2d. week the greater expansion of the spring occasioned her to lose time. With respect to newspapers, none can now come to Washington for me. Of those which,...
Since my letter of yesterday I have recieved yours of the 27 th & 28 th and in the former the 500.D. for mrs Trist . the bronze time piece mentioned will run a fortnight, but I found it better to wind it up once a week, as during the 2 d week the greater expansion of the spring occasioned her to lose time. with respect to newspapers , none can now come to Washington for me. of those which,...
I have to acknolege your favor of the 9th. and to thank you for the political information it contained. Reading the newspapers but little & that little but as the romance of the day, a word of truth now & then comes like the drop of water on the tongue of Dives. If the British ministry are changing their policy towards us, it is because their nation, or rather the city of London which is the...
I have to acknolege your favor of the 9 th and to thank you for the political information it contained. reading the newspapers but little & that little but as the romance of the day, a word of truth now & then comes like the drop of water on the tongue of Dives . if the British ministry are changing their policy towards us, it is because their nation, or rather the city of London which is the...
I hereby assign & convey to James Madison President of the Uni ted States the within named servant , John , otherwise called John Freeman during the remaining term of his service from the 11 th day of March last past when he was delivered to the said James for the consideration of two hundred and thirty one Dollars 81. cents . Witness m y hand
Yours of the 24th. came to hand last night. The correspondence between mr. Smith & mr. Erskine had been recieved three days before. I sincerely congratulate you on the change it has produced in our situation. It is the source of very general joy here, & could it have arrived one month sooner would have had important effects not only on the elections of other states, but of this also, from...
Yours of the 24 th came to hand last night. the correspondence between mr Smith & mr Erskine had been recieved three days before. I sincerely congratulate you on the change it has produced in our situation. it is the source of very general joy here, & could it have arrived one month sooner would have had important effects not only on the elections of other states, but of this also, from which...
It is my duty to write to you on the subject of the Note you were so kind as to endorse for me at the bank of the US. and I do it willingly altho’ painfully. Notwithstanding a fixed determination to take care that at the termination of my duties at Washington my pecuniary matters should at least be square, & my confidence that they would be so, I found, by an estimate made in December last,...
It is my duty to write to you on the subject of the Note you were so kind as to endorse for me at the bank of the US. and I do it willingly altho’ painfully. notwithstanding a fixed determination to take care that at the termination of my duties at Washington my pecuniary matters should at least be square, & my confidence that they would be so, I found, by an estimate made in December last,...
I inclose you three letters from detained seamen which came to hand by the last post. Your favor of the 12th. was recieved at the same time. The intelligence by the Pacific gives me great anxiety. When I consider the tenor of the new order of council & the official exposition of it by the Lords of trade to the London American merchants (in the inclosed paper) and compare it with the engagement...
I inclose you three letters from detained seamen which came to hand by the last post. your favor of the 12 th was recieved at the same time. the intelligence by the Pacific gives me great anxiety. when I consider the tenor of the new order of council & the official exposition of it by the Lords of trade to the London American merchants (in the inclosed paper) and compare it with the engagement...
Your two letters of the 4th. & 7th. were recieved by the last mail. I now inclose you the rough draught of the letter to the emperor of Russia. I think there must be an exact facsimile of it in the office, from which mr. Short’s must have been copied; because that the one now inclosed has never been out of my hands appears by there being no fold in the paper till now, and it is evidently a...
Your two letters of the 4 th & 7 th were recieved by the last mail. I now inclose you the rough draught of the letter to myself the emperor of Russia . I think there must be an exact facsimile of it in the office, from which mr. Short’s must have been copied; because that the one now inclosed has never been out of my hands appears by there being no fold in the paper till now, and it is...
I recieved your’s of yesterday by mr. Coles. My journey to Bedford has been delayed by sickness among my laboring people. No new case having arisen for some time, I am in hopes it is at an end. Still no particular object fixing my departure to any precise time, it lies over for convenience, and should I fix a time before we have the pleasure of seeing yourself & mrs. Madison here I shall...
I recieved your’s of yesterday by mr Coles . my journey to Bedford has been delayed by sickness among my laboring people. no new case having arisen for some time, I am in hopes it is at an end. still no particular object fixing my departure to any precise time, it lies over for convenience, and should I fix a time before we have the pleasure of seeing yourself & mrs Madison here I shall...
I had intended to have been with you before this, but my daughter, who wishes to pay her respects to mrs. Madison & yourself at the same time, has been confined by the illness of her youngest child. He has been mending for some days, but slowly, & from the nature of his complaint (visceral) it will be some days yet before she can leave him. I think therefore, on the departure of our present...
I had intended to have been with you before this, but my daughter , who wishes to pay her respects to mrs Madison & yourself at the same time, has been confined by the illness of her youngest child . he has been mending for some days, but slowly, & from the nature of his complaint (visceral) it will be some days yet before she can leave him. I think therefore, on the departure of our present...
Letter not found. 18 September 1809. Jefferson hopes to visit Montpelier before JM returns to Washington and will make the trip if the health of his grandson Benjamin Franklin Randolph improves. Mrs. Thomas Mann Randolph, Jefferson’s daughter, will accompany him if the boy is sufficiently recovered (brief abstract in International Autographs Catalogue No. 5 [1954], item 140).
M r Coles , whom I saw yesterday, informs me you propose to set out for Washington this day week. I have been waiting in the hope that little Benjamin would so far recover as that his mother might leave him. but his recovery, tho’ steady, is very slow. we barely discover every day some little additional proof of his getting better. I shall wait till the day after tomorrow in the hope of mrs...
I recieved last night yours of the 6th. & now return mr. Dupont’s letter. At a time when I had a hope that Virginia would establish an University I asked of mr. Dupont & Dr. Priestly to give me their ideas on the best division of the useful sciences into Professorships. The latter did it concisely; but Dupont wrote an elaborate treatise on education which I still possess. After I saw that...
I recieved last night yours of the 6 th & now return mr Dupont’s letter. at a time when I had a hope that Virginia would establish an University I asked of mr Dupont & D r Priestly to give me their ideas on the best division of the useful sciences into Professorships: the latter did it concisely; but Dupont wrote an elaborate treatise on education which I still possess. after I saw that...
I recieved at Richmond your favor covering a check on the bank of Norfolk for 743. Doll. 15. cents the balance in full of our accounts. I have learnt from P. Carr that under an idea that Rodney was about to resign, & on a desire expressed by mr. R. Smith to him or some other person that Wirt should be sounded, it had been found that he would accept. I do not know whether it was communicated to...
I recieved at Richmond your favor covering a check on the bank of Norfolk for 743. Doll. 15. cents the balance in full of our accounts. I have learnt from P. Carr that under an idea that Rodney was about to resign, & on a desire expressed by mr R. Smith to him or some other person that Wirt should be sounded, it had been found that he would accept. I do not know whether it was communicated to...
Yours of Oct. 30. came to hand last night. Capt Coles passed this place on the 31st. to Washington. I gave a copy of the paper you desire to Thomas Monroe for his government; and, through him, another to Mayor Brent, that the city magistracy might understand what I considered as the limits separating our rights & duties. Capt Coles can borrow either of these probably for copying. Should they...
Yours of Oct. 30. came to hand last night. Cap t Coles passed this place on the 31 st to Washington . I gave a copy of the paper you desire to Thomas Monroe for his government; and, through him, another to Mayor Brent , that the city magistracy might understand what I considered as the limits separating our rights & duties. Cap t Coles
Your letter of the 6th. was recieved from our post office on the 24th. after my return from Bedford. I now re-inclose the letters of Mr. Short & Romanzoff, and with them a letter from Armstrong for your perusal, as there may be some matters in it not otherwise communicated. The infatuation of the British government & nation is beyond every thing immaginable. A thousand circumstances announce...
Your letter of the 6 th was recieved from our post office on the 24 th of after my return from Bedford . I now re-inclose the letters of M r Short & Romanzoff, and with them a letter from Armstrong for your perusal, as there may be some matters in it not otherwise communicated. the infatuation of the British government & nation is beyond every thing immaginable. a thousand circumstances...
I recieved last night yours of the 27th. & rode this morning to Colo. Monroe’s. I found him preparing to set out tomorrow morning for Loudon, from whence he will not return till Christmas. I had an hour or two’s frank conversation with him. The catastrophe of poor Lewis served to lead us to the point intended. I reminded him that in the letter I wrote to him while in Europe proposing the...
I recieved last night yours of the 27 th & rode this morning to Col o Monroe’s . I found him preparing to set out tomorrow morning for Loudon , from whence he will not return till Christmas. I had an hour or two’s frank conversation with him. the catastrophe of poor Lewis served to lead us to the point intended. I reminded him that in the letter I wrote to him while in Europe proposing the...
The inclosed letter is from Father Richard, the Director of a school at Detroit; & being on a subject in which the departments both of the Treasury & War are concerned, I take the liberty of inclosing it to yourself as the center which may unite these two agencies. The transactions which it alludes to took place in the months of Dec. & Jan. preceding my retirement from office, & as I think it...
The inclosed letter is from Father Richard , the Director of a school at Detroit ; & being on a subject in which the departments both of the Treasury & War are concerned, I take the liberty of inclosing it to yourself as the center which may unite these two agencies. the transactions which it alludes to took place in the months of Dec. & Jan. preceding my retirement from office, & as I think...
You knew, I believe that the society of Agriculture of Paris had sent me a plough which they supposed the best ever made in Europe. They at the same time requested me to send them one of ours with my mould board. I have made one for them which every body agrees to be the handsomest & of the most promising appearance they have ever seen, and I have five at work on my own farms, than which we...
You knew, I believe that the society of Agriculture of Paris had sent me a plough which they supposed the best ever ass made in Europe . they at the same time requested me to send them one of ours with my mould board. I have made one for them which every body agrees to be the ha d ndsomest & of the most promising appearance they have ever seen, and I have five at work on my own farms, than...
On my return from Bedford I found in our post office your favor of the 2d. inst. as also the inclosed letter from mr. Martin, formerly of N. C. recommended to us by mr. Blackledge. I dare say you will recollect more of him than I do. I remember that his being a native French man, educated I believe to the law there, very long a resident of this country and become a respectable lawyer with us,...
On my return from Bedford I found in our post office your favor of the 2 d inst. as also the inclosed letter from mr Martin , formerly of N.C. recommended to us by mr Blackledge . I dare say you will recollect more of him than I do. I remember that his being a native French man, educated I believe to the law there, very long a resident of this country and become a respectable lawyer with us,...
I thank you for your promised attention to my portion of the Merinos, and if there be any expences of transportation Etc & you will be so good as to advance my portion of them with yours & notify the amount it shall be promptly remitted. What shall we do with them? I have been so disgusted with the scandalous extortions lately practised in the sale of these animals, & with the ascription of...
I thank you for my your promised attention to my portion of the Merinos, and if there be any expences of transportation E t c & you will be so good as to advance my portion of them with yours & notify the amount it shall be promptly remitted. What shall we do with them? I have been so disgusted with the scandalous extortions lately practised in the sale of these animals, & with the ascription...
I inclose you the extract of a letter from Govr. Tyler which will explain itself, and I do it on the same principle on which I have sometimes done the same thing before, that whenever you are called on to select, you may have under consideration all those who may properly be thought of & the grounds of their pretensions. From what I can learn Griffin cannot stand it long, and really the state...
I inclose you a letter the extract of a letter from Gov r Tyler which will explain itself, and I do it on the same principle on which I have sometimes done the same thing before, that whenever you are called on to select, you may have under consideration all those who may properly be thought of & the grounds of their pretensions. from what I can learn Griffin cannot stand it long, and really...
In the action brought against me by Edward Livingston, the counsel employed, Wirt & Hay (Wickham declining) desire me to furnish them with the grounds of defence, with as little delay as possible. The papers relating to the batture in the offices of State, the Treasury & war, will undoubtedly be needed to exhibit facts. I am now engaged on this subject, and not to give you unnecessary trouble...
In the action brought against me by Edward Livingston , the counsel employed, Wirt & Hay ( Wickham declining) desire me to furnish them with the grounds of defence, with as little delay as possible. the papers relating to the batture in the offices of State, the Treasury & war, will undoubtedly be needed to exhibit facts. not to I am now engaged on this subject, and not to give you unnecessary...
Mr. Thweatt my particular friend and connection expecting that an excursion he is to make will put it in his power to pay his respects to you personally, en passant, and being desirous to do so, I with pleasure present him to you as a gentleman of perfect worth, and of sincere zeal in those political principles which you & I have so steadily cultivated. His energy in their support has been...