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In my letter of Mar. 12. I had the honour of explaining to you the motives which had brought me to this place. A joint letter from Mr. Adams and myself, sent by the last packet, informed you of the result of our conferences with the Tripoline minister. The conferences with the minister of Portugal have been drawn to a greater length than I expected. However, every thing is now agreed and the...
In another letter of this day I stated to you what has passed with public characters since my arrival here. Conversations with private individuals I thought it best not to mingle with the contents of that letter. Yet as some have taken place which relate to matters within our instructions, and with persons whose opinions deserve to have some weight, I will take the liberty of stating them. In...
The last letters I had the honour of addressing you from this place were of the 2d. and 27. of January. Those from London were of the 12th. of March and 23. of April. In the month of February the Baron de Blome, minister plenipotentiary at this court from Denmark informed me that he was instructed by his court to take notice to the Ministers from the U.S. appointed to negotiate a treaty of...
The duty has been imposed on me of making the following communication to Congress. It is necessary for me previously to observe, that tho’ the government of the United Netherlands have both an ordinary and extraordinary Ambassador here, yet the Patriotic party, now decisively possest of the powers of government, have sent hither a Rhingrave de Salm , as possessing their plenary confidence, to...
[Letters received both from Madrid and Algiers while I was in London having suggested that treaties with the states of Barbary would be much facilitated by a previous one with the Ottoman porte, it was agreed between Mr. Adams and myself that on my return I should consult on this subject the Count de Vergennes, whose long residence at Constantinople rendered him the best judge of it’s...
In my letter of January 2. I had the honour of stating to you what had passed here on the subject of the commerciable articles between this country and the United States. I beg leave now to resume that subject. I therein informed you that this government had agreed to receive our fish oils on the footing on which they receive those of the Hanseatic towns, which gave us a reduction of duty from...
In my letter of the 12th. inst. which goes by the same packet, but was delivered to a private hand, I had the honour of inclosing to you letters from Mr. Carmichael, Mr. Barclay and Mr. Lambe on the Barbary affairs. Others came to hand last night which are now copying, and will be inclosed to you by the post of this day as far as they can be copied. The whole cannot possibly be in readiness...
A safe opportunity occurring by the way of London, I have it now in my power to transmit you the sequel of the papers relative to Algiers which could not be in readiness to go with my letter of the 27th. inst. by the French packet, which I expect will sail from l’Orient tomorrow. I am enabled at the same time to send you a copy of the resolutions of the Committee on the subject of the tobacco...
My letters to you by the last French packet were dated May 12. 22, 23. 27. and I sent by the way of London one dated May 31. Since this I have been honoured with yours of May 5. The letter therein inclosed for Mr. Dumas has been duly forwarded; and the report on the subject of the Consular convention I delivered to the Count de Vergennes the first levee day after the return of the king, who...
According to your desire I wrote two letters to America to enquire after the fate of Mr. Gallatin. One was to Mr. Savary , from whom I have as yet received no answer. The second was to Mr. Jay Secretary for foreign affairs to the United States. He put the paragraph of my letter into the public papers, desiring those who knew any thing of Mr. Gallatin to communicate what they knew. He soon...
Since the date of my last, which was of July 8. I have been honoured with the receipt of yours of June 16. I am to thank you on the part of the minister of Geneva for the intelligence it contained on the subject of Gallatin, whose relations will be relieved by the receipt of it. The inclosed intelligence relative to the instructions of the court of London to Sr. Guy Carleton come to me thro’...
The inclosed letter from Mr. Barclay, and one from Mr. Carmichael, of which I send you extracts, are come to hand this morning, which is in time for them to go by the same gentleman who carries my letter of the 11th. I observe what Mr. Carmichael says on the subject of the Portuguese treaty, and am sorry it meets with difficulties. I doubt however whether he ascribes them to their true cause,...
The last letters I had the honor of writing you were of the 11th. and 13th. of August. Since that I have been favored with yours of July 14th and Aug. 18th.—I now inclose you such letters on the Barbary negociations as have come to hand since my last. With these is the copy of a joint letter from Mr. Adams and myself to Mr. Lamb. In mine of Augst. 13th. I mentioned that I had proposed it as a...
In a letter of Jan. 2. I had the honor of communicating to you the measures which had been pursued here for the improvement of the commerce between the U.S. and France, the general view of that commerce which I had presented to the C. de Vergennes, the circumstance of the renewal of the farms which had obliged me to press separately and in the first place, the article of tobacco, and that...
By a confidential opportunity to London I had the honour of writing to you on the 23d. instant, and of inclosing you the original letter of Monsieur de Calonnes to me on the subject of our commerce. As it is probable however that the French packet which is to sail from Lorient the 1st. of the next month will sooner reach you, I inclose some printed copies of the same letter by that conveiance,...
In a letter which I had the honor of writing you on the 26th. of Sep. I informed you that a Dutch company were making propositions to the Minister of finance here to purchase at a discount the debt due from the U.S. to this country. I have lately procured a copy of their memoir, which I now inclose. Should Congress think this subject worthy their attention, they have no time to lose, as the...
I had the honor of addressing you on the 12th. of the last month, since which your favor of Oct. 12. has been recieved, inclosing a copy of the resolution of Congress for recalling Mr. Lamb. My letter by Mr. Randall informed you that we had put an end to his powers and required him to repair to Congress. I lately recieved a letter from him dated Alicant Oct. 10. of which I have the honour to...
My last of Dec. 31. acknowleged the receipt of yours of Oct. 12. as the present does those of Oct. 3d. 9th . and 27th. together with the resolution of Congress of Octob. 16. on the claim of Shweighauser. I will proceed in this business on the return of Mr. Barclay, who being fully acquainted with all the circumstances, will be enabled to give me that information the want of which might lead me...
My last letters were of the 31st. of Decemb. and 9th. of January, since which last date I have been honoured with yours of December the 13th. and 14th. I shall pay immediate attention to your instructions relative to the S. Carolina frigate. I had the honour of informing you of an improvement in the art of coining made here by one Drost, and of sending you by Colo. Franks a specimen of his...
The packet being to sail the day after tomorrow, I have awaited the last possible moment of writing by her, in hopes I might be able to announce some favorable change in the situation of the Count de Vergennes. But none has occurred, and in the mean time he has become weaker by the continuance of his illness. Tho’ not desperately ill, he is dangerously so. The Comptroller General M. de...
In the letter of the 8th. instant which I had the honour of writing you, I informed you that the Count de Vergennes was dangerously ill. He died yesterday morning, and the Count de Montmorin is appointed his successor. Your personal knowlege of this gentleman renders it unnecessary for me to say any thing of him. Mr. Morris, during his office, being authorized to have the medals and swords...
In the letter of the 8th. instant which I had the honour of writing you, I informed you of the illness of the Count de Vergennes. In one of the present date which I send by the way of London, I have notified to you his death which happened yesterday morning, and that the Count de Montmorin is appointed his successor, with whose character you are personally acquainted. As the winds have been...
The assemblée des Notables being an event in the history of this country which excites notice, I have supposed it would not be disagreeable to you to learn it’s immediate objects, tho no ways connected with our interests. The assembly met yesterday; the king in a short but affectionate speech informed them of his wish to consult with them on the plans he had digested, and on the general good...
I had the honour of receiving at Aix your letter of Feb. 9. and immediately wrote to the Count de Montmorin, explaining the delay of the answer of Congress to the king’s letter, and desired Mr. Short to deliver that answer with my letter to Monsieur de Montmorin , which he accordingly informs me he has done. My absence prevented my noting to you in the first moment the revolution which has...
I had the honour of addressing you in a letter of May 4. from Marseilles which was to have gone by the last packet; but it arrived a few hours too late for that conveiance, and has been committed to a private one passing thro’ England, with a promise that it should go thro’ no post office. I was desirous, while at the seaports, to obtain a list of the American vessels which have come to them...
The last letter I had the honour of addressing you was dated June 21. I have now that of inclosing you a letter from the Swedish Ambassador praying that enquiry may be made for a vessel of his nation pyratically carried off, and measures taken relative to the vessel, cargo and crew. Also a letter from William Russell and others citizens of America, concerned in trade to the Island of...
An American gentleman leaving Paris this afternoon to go by the way of Lorient to Boston furnishes me the rare occasion of a conveiance, other than the Packet, sure and quick. My letter by the packet informed you of the bed of justice for enregistering the stamp tax and land tax. The parliament, on their return, came to an Arreteé (a Resolution) which, besides protesting against the...
My last letters to you were of the 6th. and 15th. of August: since which I have been honoured with yours of July 24. acknoleging the receipt of mine of the 14th. and 23d. of February. I am anxious to hear you have received that also of May 4. written from Marseilles. According to the desires of Congress expressed in their vote confirming the appointments of Francis, Giuseppe and Girolamo...
The letters of which the inclosed are copies, are this moment received, and as there is a possibility that they may reach Havre before the packet sails, I have the honor of inclosing them to you. They contain a promise of reducing the duties on tar, pitch and turpentine, and that the government will interest itself with the city of Rouen to reduce the local duty on Potash. By this you will...
When I had the honor of addressing you this morning, intelligence was handing about which I did not think well enough authenticated to communicate to you. As it is now ascertained, I avail myself of the chance that another post may yet reach Havre before the departure of the packet. This will depend on the wind which has for some days been unfavorable. I must premise that this court about 10....
The times are now so critical that every day brings something new and important, not known the day before. Observing the wind still unfavorable, I am in hopes that the packet may not sail tomorrow, and that this letter may be at Havre in time for that conveiance. Mr. Eden has waited on Count Montmorin to inform him officially that England must consider it’s convention with France relative to...
I had the honor of writing you on the 19th. of Sep. twice on the 22d. and again on the 24th. The two first went by the packet, the 3d. by a vessel bound to Philadelphia. I have not yet learned by what occasion the last went. In these several letters I communicated to you the occurrences of Europe as far as they were then known. Notwithstanding the advantage which the emperor seemed to have...
The Count de Moustier , minister plenipotentiary from the court of Versailles to the United states will have the honour of delivering you this. The connection of your offices will necessarily connect you in acquaintance: but I beg leave to present him to you on account of his personal as well as his public character. You will find him open, communicative, candid, simple in his manners, and a...
When I had the honor of addressing you on the 8th. instant, the appearances of war were such, that no one would have been surprised to hear that hostilities were actually commenced at sea. The preparatives were pushed with such a vivacity on the part of England that it was believed she had other objects in view than those she spoke out. However, having protected by her countenance the...
My last letters to you were of the 8th. and 27th. of October. In the former I mentioned to you the declaration of this country that they would interpose with force if the Prussian troops entered Holland, the entry of those troops into Holland, the declaration of England that if France did oppose force they would consider it as an act of war, the naval armaments on both sides, nomination of the...
I shall take the liberty of confiding sometimes to a private letter such details of the small history of the court or cabinet as may be worthy of being known, and yet not proper to be publicly communicated . I doubt whether the administration is yet in a permanent form. The Count de Monmorin and Baron de Breteuil are I believe firm enough in their places. It was doubted whether they would wait...
By a letter of the 2d. inst. from the Count de Moustier I perceive he is still at Brest. The wind has now been near a month in the South-Western quarter, and if it remains there a few days longer, my dispatches by the packet may reach you as soon as those by Monsr. de Moustier. This being the last post which can reach the packet, should she sail on the 10th. I avail myself of it to inform you...
The last letters I had the honour of addressing you were of the 3d. and 7th. of November. Your several favors, to wit, two of July 27. two of Oct. 24. and one of Nov. 3. have all been delivered within the course of a week past: and I embrace the earliest occasion of returning to Congress my sincere thanks for the new proofs I receive therein of their confidence in me, and of assuring them of...
Since the receipt of the letter of Monsieur de Calonne of Octob. 22. 1786. I have several times had the honour of mentioning to you that I was endeavouring to get the substance of that letter reduced into an arrêt, which, instead of being revocable by a simple letter of a comptroller general, would require an arrêt to repeal or alter it, and of course must be discussed in full council and so...
The letter of Dec. 12. which Mr. Remsen did me the favor to write me during your indisposition has been duly received; and I shall be happy to hear that the cause is removed which deprived me at that moment of the pleasure of hearing from you. My last were of the 21st. and 31st. of December. I am afraid that my intelligence may have appeared sometimes to come late to hand. My letters by the...
Mr. Adams having announced to our bankers here his approaching departure from Europe, and referred them to me for counsel on our affairs in their hands, they sent me a state of them, and of the difficulties which were pressing at the moment, and impending more seriously for the month of June. They were urging me by almost every post on this subject. In this situation, information of Mr....
In a letter of the 13th. inst. which I had the honor of addressing you from this place, I mentioned in general terms the object of my journey hither and that I should enter into more particular details by the confidential conveiance which would occur thro’ Mr. Adams and Colo. Smith. The board of Treasury had, in the month of December, given notice to our bankers here that it would be...
I had the honor of addressing you in two letters of the 13th. and 16th. of March from Amsterdam, and have since received Mr. Remsen’s of Feb. 20. I staid at Amsterdam about 10. or 12. days after the departure of Mr. Adams in hopes of seeing the million of the last year filled up. This however could not be accomplished on the spot. But the prospect was so good as to have dissipated all fears;...
The change which is likely to take place in the form of our government seems to render it proper that during the existence of the present government, an article should be mentioned which concerns me personally. Incertain however how far Congress may have decided to do business, when so near the close of their administration, less capable than those on the spot, of foreseeing the character of...
When I wrote my letter of the 4th. inst. I had no reason to doubt that a packet would have sailed on the 10th. according to the established order. The passengers had all, except one, gone to Havre in this expectation. None however is sailed, and perhaps none will sail, as I think the suppression of the packets is one of the oeconomies in contemplation. An American merchant concerned in the...
A further delay of Mr. Warville enables me to acknolege the receipt of your letter of April 24. by Mr. Paradise. Nothing new has occurred since the date of my other letters which go by this conveiance: except that about one third of the Baillages have accepted their appointments. If the others pretty generally should do the same, and the Chatelet be brought over it will place government pretty...
Having received the inclosed letter from Julien Laurent claiming his wages as Volunteer on board the Bonhomme Richard, I have the honour of forwarding it to you, supposing it will of course be referred to the proper office to take order on. I have the honour to be with sentiments of the most perfect esteem and respect Sir Your most obedient & most humble servt., RC ( DNA : PCC , No. 87, ii )....
My last letters to you were of the 4th. and 23d. of May, with a postscript of the 27th. Since that I have been honoured with yours of Apr. 24. May 16. and June 9. The most remarkeable internal occurrences since my last are these. The Noblesse of Bretagne, who had received with so much warmth the late innovations in the government, assembled and drew up a memorial to the king and chose 12....
I have waited till the last moment of Mrs. Barclay’s departure to write you the occurrences since my letter of the 3d. instant. We have received the Swedish account of an engagement between their fleet and the Russian on the Baltic, wherein they say they took one and burnt another Russian vessel with the loss of one on their side, and that the victory remained with them. They say at the same...
In my letter of the last night, written in the moment of Mrs. Barclay’s departure, I had the honour of mentioning to you that it was now pretty certain that the States general would be assembled in the next year, and probably in the month of May. This morning an Arret is published, announcing that their meeting is fixed at the first day of May next, of which I enclose you a copy by post, in...