You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jefferson, Thomas
  • Recipient

    • Jay, John
  • Period

    • Confederation Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Jay, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
Results 1-50 of 85 sorted by editorial placement
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
We received by the last Packet the favor of your letter of Jan ry. 14. in which we have the agreeable information of your having accepted the appointment of Secretary for foreign Affairs. Besides the general interest we feel in this event as members of the Union which is to availed of your services, we are particularly happy that a channel of communication is opened for us with Congress in...
Soon after the arrival of M r. Jefferson in London, We had a conference with the Ambassador of Tripoli, at His House. The amount of all the Information we could obtain from him was that a perpetual peace was in all respects the most adviseable, because a temporary treaty would leave room for increasing demands upon every renewal of it and a stipulation for annual payments, would be liable to...
Soon after our meeting together in London, We had a Conference with the Secretary of State for foreign Affairs in which we communicated to him, the joint Commission of Congress for negotiating a Treaty of Commerce with Great Britain, and left an attested Copy of it in the Hands of his Lordship. at the same time His Lordship was informed that as the Commission was limited to two years duration,...
[ Paris, 9 Feb. 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “John Jay. The Marq. Fay. gives us hopes he will accept Sec. F. A.—war and peace doubtful—Bav. and Austr. neth.—Prussia and Dantzic settled—distractions of Holld. continue. Hastings and E.I. affairs difficult for Brit. parliament—have forgot us—we must urge them as to separate articles—expect by packet which sails in Feb. to receive orders about...
I was honoured on the 2d. instant with the receipt of your favor of Mar. 15. inclosing the resolution of Congress of the 10th. of the same month appointing me their Minister plenipotentiary at this court; and also of your second letter of Mar. 22. covering the commission and letter of credence for that appointment. I beg permission through you, Sir, to testify to Congress my gratitude for this...
As it frequently happens that we cannot meet with passengers going hence to the packet to whom we may commit our letters, and it may be often necessary to write to you on subjects improper for the inspection of this government to which the letters by post are subject, I have made out a cypher which I now inclose and deliver to young Mr. Adams who will have the honor of delivering you this. The...
I had the honour of addressing you on the 11th. of the last month by young Mr. Adams who sailed in the packet of that month. That of the present is likely to be retarded to the first of July if not longer. On the 14th. of May I communicated to the Count de Vergennes my appointment as minister plenipotentiary to this court and on the 17th. delivered my letter of credence to the king at a...
My last letter to you was dated the 17th. of June. The present serves to cover some papers put into my hands by Capt. Paul Jones. They respect an antient matter which is shortly this. While Capt. Jones was hovering on the coast of England in the year 1779. a British pilot, John Jackson by name, came on board him supposing him to be British. Capt. Jones found it convenient to detain him as a...
I was honoured on the 22d. Ult. with the receipt of your letter of June 15. and delivered the letter therein inclosed from the President of Congress to the king. I took an opportunity of asking the Count de Vergennes whether the Chevalier Luzerne proposed to return to America? He answered me that he did, and that he was here, for a time only, to arrange his private affairs. Of course this...
The letter of June 18. signed by Dr. Franklin and myself is the last addressed to you from hence on the objects of the general commission. As circumstances rendered it necessary that the signature of the Prussian treaty whenever it should be in readiness, should be made separately, the intervention of a person of confidence between the Prussian plenipotentiary and us became also requisite. His...
I shall sometimes ask your permission to write you letters, not official but private. The present is of this kind, and is occasioned by the question proposed in yours of June 14 ‘Whether it would be useful to us to carry all our own productions, or none?’ Were we perfectly free to decide this question, I should reason as follows. We have now lands enough to employ an infinite number of people...
I had the honour of writing to you on the 14th. inst. by a Mr. Cannon of Connecticut who was to sail in the packet. Since that date yours of July 13. is come to hand. The times for the sailing of the packets being somewhat deranged, I avail myself of a conveiance of the present by the Mr. Fitzhughs of Virginia who expect to land at Philadelphia. I inclose you a correspondence which has taken...
My letter of Aug. 30. acknowleged the receipt of yours of July 13. Since that I have received your letter of Aug. 13. inclosing a correspondence between the M. de la Fayette and Monsr. de Calonne, and another of the same date inclosing the papers in Fortin’s case. I immediately wrote to Mr. Limozin at Havre desiring he would send me a state of the case, and inform me what were the difficulties...
In my letter of Aug. 14. I had the honor of expressing to you the uneasiness I felt at the delay of the instructions on the subject of the Barbary treaties of which Mr. Lamb was the bearer, and of informing you that I had proposed to Mr. Adams that if he did not arrive either in the French or English packets then expected, we should send some person to negotiate these treaties. As he did not...
Since my last to you, which were dated the 6th. and 11th. of October, I have been honoured with yours of the 1st. 14th. and 15th. of September . Since the departure of the Mr. Fitzhughs, who carried my last, no confidential opportunity of writing has offered. The present I send by the way of London, and being to pass thro’ the post offices of both countries, shall mention in it nothing but...
Several Conferences and Letters having passed between the Count de Vergennes and myself on the Subject of the Commerce of this Country with the U.S. I think them sufficiently interesting to be communicated to Congress. They are stated in the Form of a Report and are herein inclosed. The Length of this Despatch perhaps needs Apology. Yet I have not been able to abridge it without omitting...
I received on the 18th. instant your private favor of Dec. 9. and thank you for the confidence you are so good as to repose in me, of which that communication is a proof. As such it is a gratification to me, because it meets the esteem I have ever borne you. But nothing was needed to keep my mind right on that subject, and I believe I may say the public mind here. The sentiments entertained of...
I had the honor of addressing you by the way of London on the 2d. instant. Since that your’s of Dec. 7. has come to hand. I have now the pleasure to inform you that Mr. Barclay, having settled as far as depended on him the accounts of Monsieur de Beaumarchais, left Paris on the 15th. instant to proceed to Marocco. Business obliged him to go by the way of l’Orient and Bourdeaux, but he told me...
The several commissions, to which Congress were pleased to appoint Colo. Humphreys Secretary of legation, being shortly to expire, and a French packet offering him a convenient passage in the month of April, he proposes to avail himself of that occasion of returning to his own country and of there presenting his respects and thanks to Congress. As a member of the several commissions with which...
The date of a letter from London will doubtless be as unexpected to you as it was unforeseen by myself a few days ago. On the 27th. of the last month Colo. Smith arrived in Paris with a letter from Mr. Adams informing me that there was at this place a minister from Tripoli, having general powers to enter into treaties on behalf of his state, and with whom it was possible we might do something...
In my letter of Mar. 12. I had the honour of explaining to you the motives which had brought me to this place. A joint letter from Mr. Adams and myself, sent by the last packet, informed you of the result of our conferences with the Tripoline minister. The conferences with the minister of Portugal have been drawn to a greater length than I expected. However, every thing is now agreed and the...
In another letter of this day I stated to you what has passed with public characters since my arrival here. Conversations with private individuals I thought it best not to mingle with the contents of that letter. Yet as some have taken place which relate to matters within our instructions, and with persons whose opinions deserve to have some weight, I will take the liberty of stating them. In...
The last letters I had the honour of addressing you from this place were of the 2d. and 27. of January. Those from London were of the 12th. of March and 23. of April. In the month of February the Baron de Blome, minister plenipotentiary at this court from Denmark informed me that he was instructed by his court to take notice to the Ministers from the U.S. appointed to negotiate a treaty of...
The duty has been imposed on me of making the following communication to Congress. It is necessary for me previously to observe, that tho’ the government of the United Netherlands have both an ordinary and extraordinary Ambassador here, yet the Patriotic party, now decisively possest of the powers of government, have sent hither a Rhingrave de Salm , as possessing their plenary confidence, to...
[Letters received both from Madrid and Algiers while I was in London having suggested that treaties with the states of Barbary would be much facilitated by a previous one with the Ottoman porte, it was agreed between Mr. Adams and myself that on my return I should consult on this subject the Count de Vergennes, whose long residence at Constantinople rendered him the best judge of it’s...
In my letter of January 2. I had the honour of stating to you what had passed here on the subject of the commerciable articles between this country and the United States. I beg leave now to resume that subject. I therein informed you that this government had agreed to receive our fish oils on the footing on which they receive those of the Hanseatic towns, which gave us a reduction of duty from...
In my letter of the 12th. inst. which goes by the same packet, but was delivered to a private hand, I had the honour of inclosing to you letters from Mr. Carmichael, Mr. Barclay and Mr. Lambe on the Barbary affairs. Others came to hand last night which are now copying, and will be inclosed to you by the post of this day as far as they can be copied. The whole cannot possibly be in readiness...
A safe opportunity occurring by the way of London, I have it now in my power to transmit you the sequel of the papers relative to Algiers which could not be in readiness to go with my letter of the 27th. inst. by the French packet, which I expect will sail from l’Orient tomorrow. I am enabled at the same time to send you a copy of the resolutions of the Committee on the subject of the tobacco...
My letters to you by the last French packet were dated May 12. 22, 23. 27. and I sent by the way of London one dated May 31. Since this I have been honoured with yours of May 5. The letter therein inclosed for Mr. Dumas has been duly forwarded; and the report on the subject of the Consular convention I delivered to the Count de Vergennes the first levee day after the return of the king, who...
According to your desire I wrote two letters to America to enquire after the fate of Mr. Gallatin. One was to Mr. Savary , from whom I have as yet received no answer. The second was to Mr. Jay Secretary for foreign affairs to the United States. He put the paragraph of my letter into the public papers, desiring those who knew any thing of Mr. Gallatin to communicate what they knew. He soon...
Since the date of my last, which was of July 8. I have been honoured with the receipt of yours of June 16. I am to thank you on the part of the minister of Geneva for the intelligence it contained on the subject of Gallatin, whose relations will be relieved by the receipt of it. The inclosed intelligence relative to the instructions of the court of London to Sr. Guy Carleton come to me thro’...
The inclosed letter from Mr. Barclay, and one from Mr. Carmichael, of which I send you extracts, are come to hand this morning, which is in time for them to go by the same gentleman who carries my letter of the 11th. I observe what Mr. Carmichael says on the subject of the Portuguese treaty, and am sorry it meets with difficulties. I doubt however whether he ascribes them to their true cause,...
The last letters I had the honor of writing you were of the 11th. and 13th. of August. Since that I have been favored with yours of July 14th and Aug. 18th.—I now inclose you such letters on the Barbary negociations as have come to hand since my last. With these is the copy of a joint letter from Mr. Adams and myself to Mr. Lamb. In mine of Augst. 13th. I mentioned that I had proposed it as a...
In a letter of Jan. 2. I had the honor of communicating to you the measures which had been pursued here for the improvement of the commerce between the U.S. and France, the general view of that commerce which I had presented to the C. de Vergennes, the circumstance of the renewal of the farms which had obliged me to press separately and in the first place, the article of tobacco, and that...
By a confidential opportunity to London I had the honour of writing to you on the 23d. instant, and of inclosing you the original letter of Monsieur de Calonnes to me on the subject of our commerce. As it is probable however that the French packet which is to sail from Lorient the 1st. of the next month will sooner reach you, I inclose some printed copies of the same letter by that conveiance,...
In a letter which I had the honor of writing you on the 26th. of Sep. I informed you that a Dutch company were making propositions to the Minister of finance here to purchase at a discount the debt due from the U.S. to this country. I have lately procured a copy of their memoir, which I now inclose. Should Congress think this subject worthy their attention, they have no time to lose, as the...
I had the honor of addressing you on the 12th. of the last month, since which your favor of Oct. 12. has been recieved, inclosing a copy of the resolution of Congress for recalling Mr. Lamb. My letter by Mr. Randall informed you that we had put an end to his powers and required him to repair to Congress. I lately recieved a letter from him dated Alicant Oct. 10. of which I have the honour to...
My last of Dec. 31. acknowleged the receipt of yours of Oct. 12. as the present does those of Oct. 3d. 9th . and 27th. together with the resolution of Congress of Octob. 16. on the claim of Shweighauser. I will proceed in this business on the return of Mr. Barclay, who being fully acquainted with all the circumstances, will be enabled to give me that information the want of which might lead me...
My last letters were of the 31st. of Decemb. and 9th. of January, since which last date I have been honoured with yours of December the 13th. and 14th. I shall pay immediate attention to your instructions relative to the S. Carolina frigate. I had the honour of informing you of an improvement in the art of coining made here by one Drost, and of sending you by Colo. Franks a specimen of his...
The packet being to sail the day after tomorrow, I have awaited the last possible moment of writing by her, in hopes I might be able to announce some favorable change in the situation of the Count de Vergennes. But none has occurred, and in the mean time he has become weaker by the continuance of his illness. Tho’ not desperately ill, he is dangerously so. The Comptroller General M. de...
In the letter of the 8th. instant which I had the honour of writing you, I informed you that the Count de Vergennes was dangerously ill. He died yesterday morning, and the Count de Montmorin is appointed his successor. Your personal knowlege of this gentleman renders it unnecessary for me to say any thing of him. Mr. Morris, during his office, being authorized to have the medals and swords...
In the letter of the 8th. instant which I had the honour of writing you, I informed you of the illness of the Count de Vergennes. In one of the present date which I send by the way of London, I have notified to you his death which happened yesterday morning, and that the Count de Montmorin is appointed his successor, with whose character you are personally acquainted. As the winds have been...
The assemblée des Notables being an event in the history of this country which excites notice, I have supposed it would not be disagreeable to you to learn it’s immediate objects, tho no ways connected with our interests. The assembly met yesterday; the king in a short but affectionate speech informed them of his wish to consult with them on the plans he had digested, and on the general good...
I had the honour of receiving at Aix your letter of Feb. 9. and immediately wrote to the Count de Montmorin, explaining the delay of the answer of Congress to the king’s letter, and desired Mr. Short to deliver that answer with my letter to Monsieur de Montmorin , which he accordingly informs me he has done. My absence prevented my noting to you in the first moment the revolution which has...
I had the honour of addressing you in a letter of May 4. from Marseilles which was to have gone by the last packet; but it arrived a few hours too late for that conveiance, and has been committed to a private one passing thro’ England, with a promise that it should go thro’ no post office. I was desirous, while at the seaports, to obtain a list of the American vessels which have come to them...
The last letter I had the honour of addressing you was dated June 21. I have now that of inclosing you a letter from the Swedish Ambassador praying that enquiry may be made for a vessel of his nation pyratically carried off, and measures taken relative to the vessel, cargo and crew. Also a letter from William Russell and others citizens of America, concerned in trade to the Island of...
An American gentleman leaving Paris this afternoon to go by the way of Lorient to Boston furnishes me the rare occasion of a conveiance, other than the Packet, sure and quick. My letter by the packet informed you of the bed of justice for enregistering the stamp tax and land tax. The parliament, on their return, came to an Arreteé (a Resolution) which, besides protesting against the...
My last letters to you were of the 6th. and 15th. of August: since which I have been honoured with yours of July 24. acknoleging the receipt of mine of the 14th. and 23d. of February. I am anxious to hear you have received that also of May 4. written from Marseilles. According to the desires of Congress expressed in their vote confirming the appointments of Francis, Giuseppe and Girolamo...
The letters of which the inclosed are copies, are this moment received, and as there is a possibility that they may reach Havre before the packet sails, I have the honor of inclosing them to you. They contain a promise of reducing the duties on tar, pitch and turpentine, and that the government will interest itself with the city of Rouen to reduce the local duty on Potash. By this you will...
When I had the honor of addressing you this morning, intelligence was handing about which I did not think well enough authenticated to communicate to you. As it is now ascertained, I avail myself of the chance that another post may yet reach Havre before the departure of the packet. This will depend on the wind which has for some days been unfavorable. I must premise that this court about 10....