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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Jay, John
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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Jay, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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In my letter of Mar. 12. I had the honour of explaining to you the motives which had brought me to this place. A joint letter from Mr. Adams and myself, sent by the last packet, informed you of the result of our conferences with the Tripoline minister. The conferences with the minister of Portugal have been drawn to a greater length than I expected. However, every thing is now agreed and the...
In another letter of this day I stated to you what has passed with public characters since my arrival here. Conversations with private individuals I thought it best not to mingle with the contents of that letter. Yet as some have taken place which relate to matters within our instructions, and with persons whose opinions deserve to have some weight, I will take the liberty of stating them. In...
The last letters I had the honour of addressing you from this place were of the 2d. and 27. of January. Those from London were of the 12th. of March and 23. of April. In the month of February the Baron de Blome, minister plenipotentiary at this court from Denmark informed me that he was instructed by his court to take notice to the Ministers from the U.S. appointed to negotiate a treaty of...
The duty has been imposed on me of making the following communication to Congress. It is necessary for me previously to observe, that tho’ the government of the United Netherlands have both an ordinary and extraordinary Ambassador here, yet the Patriotic party, now decisively possest of the powers of government, have sent hither a Rhingrave de Salm , as possessing their plenary confidence, to...
[Letters received both from Madrid and Algiers while I was in London having suggested that treaties with the states of Barbary would be much facilitated by a previous one with the Ottoman porte, it was agreed between Mr. Adams and myself that on my return I should consult on this subject the Count de Vergennes, whose long residence at Constantinople rendered him the best judge of it’s...
In my letter of January 2. I had the honour of stating to you what had passed here on the subject of the commerciable articles between this country and the United States. I beg leave now to resume that subject. I therein informed you that this government had agreed to receive our fish oils on the footing on which they receive those of the Hanseatic towns, which gave us a reduction of duty from...
In my letter of the 12th. inst. which goes by the same packet, but was delivered to a private hand, I had the honour of inclosing to you letters from Mr. Carmichael, Mr. Barclay and Mr. Lambe on the Barbary affairs. Others came to hand last night which are now copying, and will be inclosed to you by the post of this day as far as they can be copied. The whole cannot possibly be in readiness...
A safe opportunity occurring by the way of London, I have it now in my power to transmit you the sequel of the papers relative to Algiers which could not be in readiness to go with my letter of the 27th. inst. by the French packet, which I expect will sail from l’Orient tomorrow. I am enabled at the same time to send you a copy of the resolutions of the Committee on the subject of the tobacco...
My letters to you by the last French packet were dated May 12. 22, 23. 27. and I sent by the way of London one dated May 31. Since this I have been honoured with yours of May 5. The letter therein inclosed for Mr. Dumas has been duly forwarded; and the report on the subject of the Consular convention I delivered to the Count de Vergennes the first levee day after the return of the king, who...
According to your desire I wrote two letters to America to enquire after the fate of Mr. Gallatin. One was to Mr. Savary , from whom I have as yet received no answer. The second was to Mr. Jay Secretary for foreign affairs to the United States. He put the paragraph of my letter into the public papers, desiring those who knew any thing of Mr. Gallatin to communicate what they knew. He soon...