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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Jay, John
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    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Jay, John" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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The last letters I had the honor of writing you were of the 11th. and 13th. of August. Since that I have been favored with yours of July 14th and Aug. 18th.—I now inclose you such letters on the Barbary negociations as have come to hand since my last. With these is the copy of a joint letter from Mr. Adams and myself to Mr. Lamb. In mine of Augst. 13th. I mentioned that I had proposed it as a...
Understanding that the vessel is not yet sailed from Havre which is to carry my letters of the 3d. and 5th. instant, I am in hopes you will receive the present with them. The Russian accounts of their victories on the Black sea must have been greatly exaggerated. According to these the Captain Pacha’s fleet was annihilated. Yet themselves have lately brought him on the stage again with 15....
In the hurry of making up my letter of the 19th. inst. I omitted to inclose the printed paper on the subject of whale oil. That omission is now supplied by another conveiance by the way of London. The explanatory Arrêt is not yet come out. I still take for granted it will pass, tho’ there be an opposition to it in the council. In the mean time orders are given to receive our oils which may...
I had the honor of addressing you by the way of London on the 2d. instant. Since that your’s of Dec. 7. has come to hand. I have now the pleasure to inform you that Mr. Barclay, having settled as far as depended on him the accounts of Monsieur de Beaumarchais, left Paris on the 15th. instant to proceed to Marocco. Business obliged him to go by the way of l’Orient and Bourdeaux, but he told me...
A safe opportunity occurring by the way of London, I have it now in my power to transmit you the sequel of the papers relative to Algiers which could not be in readiness to go with my letter of the 27th. inst. by the French packet, which I expect will sail from l’Orient tomorrow. I am enabled at the same time to send you a copy of the resolutions of the Committee on the subject of the tobacco...
The last letters I had the honour of addressing you from this place were of the 2d. and 27. of January. Those from London were of the 12th. of March and 23. of April. In the month of February the Baron de Blome, minister plenipotentiary at this court from Denmark informed me that he was instructed by his court to take notice to the Ministers from the U.S. appointed to negotiate a treaty of...
I had the honor to write to you on the 3d. 10th. and 11th. instant with a postscript of the 12th. all of which went by Mrs. Barclay. Since that date we receive an account of a third victory obtained by the Russians over the Turks on the Black sea, in which the Prince of Nassau with his gallies destroyed 2 frigates, 3 smaller vessels, and 6. gallies. The Turkish power on that sea is represented...
The operation mentioned in my letter of Feb. 4. is going on. Montmorin has proposed to Ternant to go as Chargé des affaires. Ternant called on me a few days ago to know whether I thought his appointment would be agreeable to us. Tho he is obliged to give up his regiment, which is a certainty for life, he will do it. Perhaps Otto may be left awhile longer to put Ternant into the train of...
I was honoured on the 22d. Ult. with the receipt of your letter of June 15. and delivered the letter therein inclosed from the President of Congress to the king. I took an opportunity of asking the Count de Vergennes whether the Chevalier Luzerne proposed to return to America? He answered me that he did, and that he was here, for a time only, to arrange his private affairs. Of course this...
When I had the honor of addressing you on the 8th. instant, the appearances of war were such, that no one would have been surprised to hear that hostilities were actually commenced at sea. The preparatives were pushed with such a vivacity on the part of England that it was believed she had other objects in view than those she spoke out. However, having protected by her countenance the...