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1 st None shall be admitted (unless by a particular Act of the Governors) but such as can read the first three of Tully’s Oration, and the six first Books of Virgils Æneids into English; and the ten first Chapters of S t . John’s Gospel, into Latin; and such as are well versed in all the Rules of Clark’s introduction, so as to make true grammatical Latin; and are expert in Arithmatick so far...
1 Each person, to be admitted, shall be able to give a rational account of the Latin & Greek Grammers, to render Sallust, Caesar’s Commentaries, or some part of Cicero’s Works, into English, the Gospels, at Least, from the Greek into Latin, & to translate correctly both English into Latin, & Latin into English. He shall be examined by the President, and, if admitted, shall subscribe to the...
After we parted last Saturday Evening I retired to my Room, and spent the remaining part of it in reflecting upon the Transactions of the Day, particularly such of them as emediately related to our present and future Connection. I always find myself greatly embarrassed, when I attempt to speak my Sentiments on a Subject that very nearly concerns me; it was this which prevented me from saying...
Studious to avoid every Suspicion that m[ torn ] ous to the good opinion which you say you [ torn ] of my Sincerity, I pass over the usual Formality of [my wr]iting, till I received a Letter from you, and now pay that Debt to Friendship, which tho’ before due I had not an Opportunity of discharging— By your Letter to me (expressed in very general Terms) you seemed to distrust the Reality of...
Never my Dear Friend have I been more at a Loss in answering a Letter than I now am, and never have I undertaken a Task more agreable or that has given me [ illegible ] ^ greater ^ Satisfaction. Be not surprised that on such an Occasion, I should be at a Loss; for nothing that I can say, will be adequate to your Candour, and Generosity; nor can any Terms be fully expressive of my Sentiments on...
I received Yours of the 1 st . March Yesterday. altho I did not suspect any Part of my Letter to be misterious or unintelligable, I confess I imagin d , you would hesitate in answering to every Part of it—There was a Hobby Horse in the Way. You have it seems been highly entertained of late, and by your Account of the Matter have attained every Qualification necessary to form a Buck, & entittle...
To tell you that I often find myself at a loss for something to say, would be telling you nothing new; but to inform you that whenever I sit down to write, my invention makes a point of quarrelling with my pen, will doubtless be to account for the . . . in my letters. In writing to those who, I know, prefer honest hearts to clear heads, I turn thought out of doors, and set down the first ideas...
The letter you mention to have wrote the week before last, has never come to Hand and I cant account for the Miscarriage of two Letters I wrote you by the Post last Monday, in which I informed You of the Dissolution & c .— The Paper you inclosed by will be printed to Night, and 100 shall be struck off and sent—Coll. Beekman has either wrote or procured a Paper to be written, 60 of w h . you...
The manner in which you tell your brother that you expected a letter from me contains a reproof which gives me pain. I confess appearances have been against me, and my conduct even to you, my friend, must have appeared exceptionable. My last letter I hope will apologize for seeming omissions; you have doubtless received it before this. Neglect of friends is a species of littleness to which I...
The Subscribers being desirous of forming a club for social conversation & the mutual improv t . of each other have determined to meet in the evening of the 1 th : Friday of every month, at Bardins or such other place as a Majority of the members shall from time to time appoint, & for the better regulating of the said Club do agree Benjamin Kissam John Jay David Matthews William Smith William...
To his Excellency the Right honourable John Earl of Dunmore Captain General and Governor in Chief in and over the Province of New York and the Territories depending thereon in America Chancellor and Vice Admiral of the same In Council The Petition of John Jay of the City of New York Esq r . Humbly Sheweth That there are certain pieces of Vacant Land vested in the Crown on the East Side of...
Your Doubts respecting Faulkners Declaration appear well founded, and the Remarks contained in your Letter judicious. I concieve the Charge of his having robbed the Company imports no more than a Breach of Trust—if so, it would be hazardous to insert those Counts: if we recover Damages it will be on the other, I am therefore for resting the Cause upon them, and think the Partnership should ^...
The Receipt of your Letter should have been acknowledged before had I not been out of Town when it was delivered. If by withholding an Explanation you mean to punish me for a Defe supposed Defect in Constitution, or Inaccuracy in Mode of Expression, you certainly Sir! fix your Resentment on Objects too triffling to merit serious Severity. To think with Freedom & to speak with Sincerity I knew...
I have rec d . and should have answered your Letter immediately, had I not found myself more disposed to Violence, than might be justified on cool Reflection. I believe th[ere is no one] less dis[posed to in]jure or insult oth[ers than my] self, or more ready to give Satisfaction to such as have a Right [to] require it. You speak of a Stab given your Honor this Morning. I have reflected...
Permit me to assure you, that you are exceedingly mistaken if you suppose me desirous of hushing up the Matter between us in a Way, that may be inconsistant either with your Honor or my own. The Coolness with which I now act, & which I hope will never forsake me flows from another Principle, and will always lead me to behave with Decency and with Firmness. did not imagine that as you signified...
I John Jay of the City of New York Esqr. Clerk of the Commissioners lately appointed under the Great Seal of Great Britain for settling and Determining the Boundary Line between the Colonies of New York and New Jersey do hereby Certify That all the Proceedings of the Commissioners upon his Majesty’s said Commission which they directed him me to enter are contained in this Book and that all the...
Tho a Stranger to your Lordship, I take the Liberty of troubling you with the inclosed Petition of the Inhabitants of New Britain, Settlement on the Frontier of this Province. Principles of Humanity my Lord! have led me to interest myself in Behalf of these unhappy People; and I forbear paying an ill Compliment to a generous Mind, by endeavouring to apologize for giving it an opportunity, of...
In a Town filled with Politics, and with a Mind crouded with many indigested Ideas, I have taken up my Pen in order to acknowledge the Reciept of your very friendly Letter of the 5 th : Ap: last. It bears evident Marks of Attention and Attachment, for which recieve my Thanks. The several Topics you mention require more Thought than I can now bestow upon them. I returned from the northern...
I was much surprised last Evening on being informed that in your speech of yesterday at the Coffee house (the Conclusion of which only I heard) you charged the drawers of the resolves then under Consideration with a design of thereby disuniting the Colonies. On what Evidence you found an accusation . . . I am at a loss to conceive: but as it cannot be presumed you would wantonly sport with the...
The Rec t . of your Letter (which M r Laight kindly forwarded to this Place) was exceedingly grateful to me. I am so attached to my old friends that I feel myself interested in all that concerns them, & am always happy in hearing of their Welfare I am much obliged to you for the political Hints contained in your Letter: I wish they had as much Influence on others as they have upon me. The...
To the people of Great-Britain, from the delegates appointed by the several English colonies of New-Hampshire, Massachusetts-Bay, Rhode-Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New-York, New-Jersey, Pennsylvania, the lower counties on Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North-Carolina, and South-Carolina, to consider of their grievances in general Congress, at Philadelphia, September 5th,...
When our common Liberties are invaded, our dearest Rights in Danger, and a whole Continent loudly called upon to defend and secure themselves against high handed Oppression: the Confidence reposed in us as Delegates of your respectable County is a distinguished Honour, which excites our most affectionate Esteem and demands our most grateful Acknowledgments. While we lament that our Talents are...
The polite and respectful terms in which you are pleased to communicate your approbation of our conduct, in an important office, demand our most sincere and grateful acknowledgments. Honoured by the united suffrages of our fellow-citizens, and animated by a sense of duty, and the most cordial affection for our oppressed country, however unequal to the delicate and arduous task, we undertook it...
Providence I confess has conferred Blessings upon me with a liberal hand and my days glide on thro this vale of Tears without Pain or sorrow. I thank God that (in spite of the Faculty) my Bones are not sore vexed neither do I mingle my Drink with continual Weeping. But there are many devious Paths from the common Road of Life, in which I must walk alone and be guided solely by my own Prudence...
To the Kings most excellent Majesty The Peti Humb Petition of the Freeholders & Freemen of the Colonies of New Hampshire Massachuses Bay Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pensylvania, the Governm t of on Delaware, Maryland Virginia North Carolina South Carolina & the Parish of S t . Johns in the Colony of Georgia, by their Representatives convened in general Congress at the City...
To the people of Ireland. From the Delegates appointed by the United Colonies of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the Lower Counties on Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina, in General Congress at Philadelphia, the 10th of May, 1775 . Friends and Fellow-subjects! As the...
I have rec d your Letter of the 28 th Ult. and take the earliest opportunity wh. has offered of answering it. The Principles on which you account for hav g delayed Notices of Tryal on the West Chester Causes merit my Acknowledgm ts You need be under no apprehension of Non Suits in case you sh d . prevail upon yourself to postpone the Tryal which I confess I cant forbear wishing may be the...
We are inform d . that a considerable Quantity of Drugs & Medicines are in y r . Possession belonging to a Gent. in England or Ireland. The Congress are desirous of purchasing such of them as may be of use to the Army, & I am desired to apply to you for that Purpose—Be so kind therefore as to inform me by the first opportunity whether you will dispose of them. Be assured that y r . Compliance...
I am much obliged to you for your friendly Letter by M r Fine—his Business will soon be determined— The Hint you give is by no Means pleasing—I wish your Apprehensions were without Foundation tho ’tho I have too good an opinion of your Discernment to entertain Hopes of your being mistaken. You will much oblige me by a few Lines now & then—I need ^ not ^ caution you to be careful by what Hands...
I have rec d . your Letter by M r . Clough and you may rely on my paying due Attention to your Recommendation M r . Fine has a Letter from us to your Convention inclosing a Resolve of Congress enabling them to ship on their Account Provisions &c. to the Foreign West Indies for the Purpose of purchasing Ammunition &c. Under this Resolve I apprehend you may avail yourself of M r . Fine’s...