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Proposals. That two Battallions of Marines be raised consisting of one Collonell, two Lt. Collonells, two Majors &c. (officers as usual in other Regiments) that they consist of five hundred Privates each Battalion, exclusive of Officers. That particular Care be taken that no Persons be appointed to office or inlisted into Said Battalions but such as have actually Served in the Merchant Service...
It gives me the most sensible Pleasure to convey to you, by Order of Congress, the only Tribute, which a free People will ever consent to Pay; the Tribute of Thanks and Gratitude to their Friends and Benefactors. The disinterested and patriotic Principles which led you to the Field, have also led you to Glory: and it affords no little Consolation to your Countrymen to reflect, that, as a...
On the 20th. August last I had the Pleasure of recieving and communicating to Congress your Favors of the 3d. and 4th. of that month. Be pleased to accept my Congratulations on your safe Return to your Family and Country. Yours of the 27 Feby. and 1st. March last came to Hand about ten Days ago. An Expectation of having Commands from Congress to transmit, induced me to delay writing ’till now....
I have at Length had the Pleasure of recieving your very friendly Letter of the 22d. Feby. last. It has been very long on the Road. Accept my Thanks for your kind Congratulations; and permit me to assure you that I sincerely rejoice in your having safely reached the Place of your Destination on a Business which declares the Confidence of America, and for an Object, in the Attainment of which,...
There is a Destinction between Ceremony and Attention which is not always observed tho often useful. I Of the latter former I hope there will be little of V between us, of the latter much. Public as well as personal Considerations dictate this Conduct, on my Part, and I am happy to find by your favor of the 15 Inst. Ultimo, that you approve it in the same Light mean not to be punctilious. The...
On the 4 June last I had the Pleasure of writing you a Letter acknowledging the Reciept of yours of the 15 May—since which none of your Favors have reached me. I have just been reading the Capitulation of Charles Town. I suspect they wanted Provisions. The Reputation of the Garrison will suffer till the Reasons of their Conduct are explained. I wish a good one may be in their Power. They are...
Since my last to you before you left Paris, I have been favored with no Letters from you except a few Lines sent me by Mr. Montgomery of Alicante, recommending that Gentleman as friendly to our Country. The enclosed is a Copy of an Act of Congress adopting the Regu­ lations proposed by the Empress of Russia, and of which I was desired to transmit Copies to you and Doctr. Franklin. Agreable to...
The two last posts brought me your Favors of the 26 and 28th. Ult. It really gives me great Satisfaction at Length to see a prospect of a regular Correspondence between us. The Failure of my former attempts had almost discouraged me, tho’ from the frequent miscarriage of Letters to and from me, I had Reason to impute your Silence more to that than to any other Cause. I have not recd. a...
I had the Pleasure of recg your favor of the 28 ult. a few Days ago. I congratulate You sincerely on the accession of Friesland and the flattering Prospect there is that the Example of that Province will be followed by that of Holland and the others. It would give me great Satisfaction to be able to transmit you In­ telligence equally agreable, but that is not the Case. Prudence forbids me to...
Many weeks have elapsed since I recd. a Letter from our Country, but a Packet of News papers, which I think must have been sent from the office of the Secretary for foreign affairs, was brought to me by the last Post from Bilboa. They contain nothing very interesting. There is a Paragraph in one of them under the Boston Head which mentions the safe arrival of the Cicero Capt. Hill, and among...
Your friendly Letter of the 8th. Ult. should not have remained so long unanswered, had I not been obliged by Sickness which lasted several Weeks to postpone writing to any of my Correspondents. Mrs. Jay has also been much indisposed—Indeed neither of us have been blessed with much Health since we left America. Your Negociations in Holland have been honorable to yourself as well as useful to...
I am this moment informed of a safe opportunity of conveying you a Letter, and as such another may not soon offer, I must not omit it. My opinion coincides with yours as to the Impropriety of treating with our Enemies on any other than an equal footing. We have told mr Oswald so, and he has sent an Express to London to communicate it, and to require further Instructions. He has not yet recd....
Articles agreed upon by and between Richard Oswald Esquire the Commissioner of His Britannic Majesty, for treating of Peace with the Commissioners of the United States of America, on behalf of His said Majesty, on the one part. And Benjamin Franklin, John Jay and John Adams, three of the Commissioners of the said States for treating of Peace with the Commissioner of His said Majesty, on their...
In answer to the letter you did us the honor to write on the 4 th. ins t. we beg leave to repeat what we often said in Conversation, viz. that the Restoration of such of the Estates of Refugees, as have been confiscated, is impracticable; because they were confiscated by Laws of particular States, &, in many instances, have passed by legal titles through several hands— Besides, Sir, as this a...
We have received the Letter you did us the honor to write on the 25 th. Inst. Our Country has had early and repeated Proofs both of your Readiness and Abilities to do her Service. The Prospect of an inactive Campaign in America, induced us to adopt the Opinion, that you might be more useful here than there, especially in Case the Negotiation for Peace on the Part of France in England, should...
Congress will recommend to the Legislature of each of the thirteen States to appoint Commissioners to be under Oath to appraise at a just Value, at this Time the Estates that have been confiscated, and to make Provision, in a reasonable Time, not exceeding two Years for the a Compensation, to those of the Refugees who have not taken an active Part in the War against the United states, and of...
That the Subjects of his Britannic Majesty and the People of the Said United States Shall continue to enjoy, unmolested, the Right to take Fish of every Kind, on the Grand Bank and on all the other Banks of Newfoundland: also in the Gulph of St Laurence, and in all other Places, where the Inhabitants of both Countries, used at any time heretofore to fish; and the Citizens of the Said United...
That the Subjects of his Britannic Majesty and the People of the Said United States, Shall continue to enjoy unmolested, the Right to take Fish of every kind on the gr all the Banks of Newfoundland, in the Gulph of St Lawrence, and all other Places, where the Inhabitants of both Countries used formerly at any Time heretofore, to fish; and also to dry and cure the Same, at the accustomed Places...
Articles agreed upon by and between Richard Oswald Esquire, the Commissioner of his Britannic Majesty for treating of Peace with the Commissioners of the United States of America, in behalf of his Said Majesty, on the one Part, and John Adams Benjamin Franklin, John Jay and Henry Laurens, four of the Commissioners of the Said States for treating of Peace with the Commissioner of his Said...
Articles to be proposed in the definitive Treaty. MS ( Adams Papers ); endorsed: “Minutes of Articles to be / proposed in the definitive / Treaty.” Filmed at [ Dec. 1782 – June 1783 ]. These dates are derived from JA ’s Diary entries for 10, 12, and 13 Dec. ( JA, D&A Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 3:94–96 ). In the first, JA...
We have the Honour to congratulate you, on the Signature of the preliminary Treaty of Peace, between his Britannic Majesty and the United States of America, to be inserted in the definitive Treaty, when France and Britain Shall have agreed upon their Terms. The Articles, of which We do ourselves the honour to inclose you a Copy, were compleated, on the thirtieth of last Month. To Us, at this...
We have the honour to congratulate Congress on the Signature of the Preliminaries of a Peace between the Crown of Great Britain & the United States of America, to be inserted in a definitive Treaty so soon as the Terms between the Crowns of France & Great Britain shall be agreed on. A Copy of the Articles is here inclosed, and we cannot but flatter ourselves; that they will appear to Congress...
M r. Fitzherbert has just been with me. He will give passports for american merchantmen, on our doing the like for british ones. He informed me that Doct r. Franklin is preparing a number of these Passports, in his own name. As this Business appears to both of us to appertain rather to the american Commissioners for peace, than to the residentiary minister at this or any other Court; would it...
We John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and John Jay, three of the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America for making Peace with Great Britain. To all Captains or Commanders of Ships of War, Privateers or armed Vessels belonging to the said States, or to either of them, or to any of the Citizens of the same—And to all others whom these Presents may concern send Greeting. Whereas...
We have rec d. the Letter w h you did us the Honor to write on the 18 th. Inst, together with the Passports mentioned in it. His britannic Majesty’s Proclamation of the 14 th. Instant has our entire approbation, and we have the honor of transmitting to you, herewith enclosed, a Declaration perfectly correspondent with it. It appears to us important to both Countries that a System be speedily...
By the Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America for making Peace with Great Britain A Declaration of the Cessation of Arms, as well by Sea, as Land, agreed upon between His Majesty the King of Great Britain and the United States of America Whereas Preliminary Articles, were Signed, at Paris, on the thirtieth Day of November last, between the Plenipotentiaries of his Said...
on calling this Moment for my Man Manuel to comb me I am told he is gone to shew my Nephew the Fair— I fear they will have so many fine Things & Raree shows to see and admire, that my Head will remain in statu quo ’till afternoon, & consequently our intended Visit to C t. Sarsfield be postponed. Thus does Tyrant Custom sometimes hold us by a Hair , and thus do ridiculous Fashions make us...
Articles agreed upon by and between David Hartley Esquire, Minister Plenipotentiary of his Britannic Majesty for &c in behalf of his Said Majesty on the one Part, and J.A. B.F. J.J. and H.L, Ministers Plenipotentiary of the United States of America for treating of Peace with the Minister Plenipotentiary of his Said Majesty, on their behalf, on the other Part, in Addition to those Articles...
Article. Whereas Provisional Articles, were agreed upon by and between the Crown of Great Britain on one side and the United states of America on the other on the 30 of November 1782, to be inserted in, and to constitute the Treaty of Peace proposed to be concluded between the Crown of Great Britain and the Said United states of America, but which Treaty was not to be concluded, untill Terms...
Whereas, by the 6 th. Article of the Provisional Treaty of the 30 th of November 1782, it was agreed in these Words vizt “That there Shall be no future Confiscations made, nor any Prosecutions commenced, against any Person or Persons, for, or by Reason of, the Part which he or they may have taken in the present War, and that no Person Shall on that Account, Suffer any future Loss or Damage,...
Article. Manufactures. foreign Commodities. It is agreed, that American Merchants shall be allowed to import into any Part of the Dominions of his Britannic Majesty and there Sell and dispose of any Manufactures of the said United states or any other Merchandizes, of whatever kind of the Growth Production or Manufacture of any Part of the World, for the Purpose of making Remittances and paying...
Article. Commerce to be in force for Five Years unless sooner altered by a Treaty of Commerce 1. It is agreed that so soon as his Britannic Majesty, shall have withdrawn all his Armies Garrisons and Fleets, from the Said United states and from every Port Place and Harbour within the Same, according to the 7 Article of the Provisional Treaty of 30 Nov. 1782 all Ports in the Dominions of either...
Article. His Britannic Majesty agrees, that within Months from this Date, and as much Sooner as may be, he will withdraw all his Armies, Garrisons and Fleets, from the Said United States, and from every Port Place and Harbour within the Same, and without causing any Destruction, or carrying away any Negroes, or other Property of the American Inhabitants, and leaving in all Fortifications the...
[ Paris, 29 April 1783 ]. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:114–115 . MS ( Adams Papers ). LbC ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 109. LbC-Tr
Paris, 22 May 1783. PRINTED: JA , D&A , 3:125–127 . LbC-Tr ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. With this offer the commissioners sought to counter Hartley’s proposal of the previous day (above) as well as the 14 May Order in Council. They proposed an agreement whereby both parties would appoint ministers to negotiate a permanent commercial treaty. Until such time as an agreement was concluded,...
[ Paris ], June 1783. LbC-Tr ’s in Jean L’Air de Lamotte’s hand ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. The two proposals calendared here, one by David Hartley and the other by John Jay, are dated June in the Letterbook, but any effort to arrive at an exact date is problematical. They were likely done sometime after 21 May but prior to Hartley’s letter to the commissioners of 14 June , above, and...
I hope I may by this Time congratulate You on your safe Arrival, and happy meeting with your Son at amsterdam. M r. Laurens is here, & in better Health than I have heretofore seen him since he left America— His Stay will probably be short, for his Permission to return creates Doubts in his Mind as to the Propriety of his continuing to act with us, unless by our particular Request; and M r...
Last night I rec d. your obliging Favor of the 7 Inst. & the Letters mentioned to be enclosed with it— The one for M r Laurens was immediately sent to his Lodgings. The Circumstances you mention are interesting, and will afford matter for Deliberation & Comments when we meet. My Return to London will depend on one of two Things Viz t. on being satisfied that I am to expect little or no Benefit...
D r. Franklin informs me, that in your Passage from England to Holland, you experienced many more difficulties than are common even at this rigid Season. Mine from Dover to Calais, was far from being short or pleasant. Neptune however was less uncivil to me than to You— Neither of us have enjoyed much of his favor: but I will forgive him with all my Heart, if he will let me pass once more in...
We had the honor of receiving your Favour of the 20 th: Inst, and are persuaded that the Communication of the Friendly Disposition of his Prussian Majesty made to you by the Baron de Thuilemeyer will give great Pleasure to Congress. The Respect with which the Reputation of that great Prince has impress’d the United States, early induced them to consider his Friendship as a desirable Object;...
I thank You for your obliging Letter of the 2 d. Inst—& congratulate you on the Recovery of your Health, as well as on the Success of your measures for preserving our Credit, for which you certainly merit the Acknowledgm ts. of the United States in general, and of their Financier in particular. It seems to me that this Climate would be at least as propitious to your Health as that of Holland;...
Your Fav r. of the 20 th. Inst. arrived last Evening— It is not in pursuance of a recent or hasty Resolution, that I am preparing to return: It has been long taken & maturely considered. the public Accounts still detain me, for ’tho’ always kept by M r Carmichael, I do not chuse to leave them unsettled behind me— when that Obstacle ceases, which I expect will be very soon, I shall leave Paris....
We received the Letter you did us the honour of writing to us the 10 th. Inst, with the project of a Treaty that had been transmitted to you by the Baron de Thulemeier, which we have examined, & return herewith, having made a few small Additions or Changes of Words to be proposed, such as Citoyens for Sujets and the like, and intimated some Explanations as wanted in particular Paragraphs. The...
One of these Days I shall devote a Leisure Hour to forming a Cypher, and will send it to You by the first good Conveyance that may afterwards offer. at present I am engaged on many Committees, so that my attendance on them and on Congress, keeps me fully employed. I observe with Pleasure that in this Congress there appears to be good Talents & good Dispositions. none of their more important...
On the 21 st: Ultimo I accepted the Place of Secretary for foreign Affairs. All the foreign letters which had been received during the recess of Congress were then and are still in the hands of a Committee to whom they had been referred—none have since arrived.— The adjournment from Trenton to this Place necessarily occasioned delay in business— Congress yesterday made a House, and I expect...
I have now the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Ratification made 1 st Feb y: instant of the contract or Engagement which you entered into as Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to their High Mightinesses the Lords, the States General of the United Netherlands, in Behalf of the said States, with Mess rs. Wilhelm & Jan Willink & others for a Loan of two...
On the 7 th of May 1784 Congress were pleased to resolve “that Treaties of Amity and Commerce be entered into with Morocco, and the Regencies of Tunis, Algiers and Tripoli, to continue for the term of ten years or for a term as much longer as can be procured” They also resolved “that their Ministers to be commissioned for treating with foreign nations, make known to the Emperor of Morocco the...
Duplicate. The United States in Congress Assembled. [ 11 March 1785 ] To all to whom these Presents shall come or be made known send Greeting: Whereas We, reposing special Trust and Confidence in the Integrity, Prudence and Ability of our trusty and well beloved The Honorable John Adams, late one of our Ministers Plenipotentiary for negotiating a Peace, and heretofore a Delegate in Congress...
To the Great, Noble and Imperial Sovereign, the Emperor of Morocco.— We the United States of America in Congress Assembled, being desirous of cultivating and establishing Peace and Harmony between your Majesty and our Nation, have appointed the Honorable John Adams late one of our Ministers Plenipotentiary for negotiating a Peace, and heretofore a Delegate in Congress from the State of...
The enclosed Extracts from the Journal of Congress will inform you of your Appointment to go as Minister to the Court of London, and of M r. Smith’s being elected Secretary to the Legation. I congratulate you on this Event. It argues the Confidence reposed in you by the United States, and I am persuaded will redound to their Advantage as well as to your Reputation.— The necessary Papers are...