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The Chief Justice of the United States, presents his compliments to the Attorney General, and requests the favor of him to lay before the Board of trustees, the opinion herewith enclosed, on the question stated in their act of the 26th instant; a copy of which the Chief Justice yesterday received, enclosed in the letter which the Attorney General did him the honor to write on the 29th instant....
I have this Moment afternoon recd. the Letter wh. you did me the Honor to write on the 21 Inst— by & by which I am informed that the Trustees of the sinking fund are being equally divided in opinion respecting the Construction of their authority under the Act making Provision for the Reduction of the public Debt, my attendance had become necessary— [ crossed out: On considering the Act in...
By the post I recd. this afternoon Letters from the Vice Presidt. & Atty. Genl. calling me to the Board of Trustees. My answers to both are necessarily very concise, having been engag’d by Company, and now being pressed for Time, they are enclosed. I regard my Duty to attend the Courts as being in point of legal Obligation primary , and to attend the Trustees as secondary —and yet I can...
As I shall be absent from the next sup: Court, obvious Considerations urge me to mention to You the Reasons of it. Early in the next month I expect an Addition to my family—Mrs Jay’s delicate Health (she having for more than three weeks past been confined to her chamber) renders that Event so interesting, that altho she is now much better, I cannot prevail on myself to be then at a Distance...
I cannot easily tell you how much I am pleased & obliged by your friendly Letter of the 4th. Instant:—were I to pursue my Inclinations, I should without Hesitation accept your kind Invitation—but our Inclinations even in things innocent must not always be gratified. my Visits to Philadelphia have ceased to be occasional, or I should certainly avail myself of those opportunities which your...
[ New York, November 14, 1791. On December 5, 1791, Hamilton wrote to Jay : “Your letter of the 14th of November duly came to hand.” Letter not found. ]
My first Idea was to have made a Sketch of what, in my opinion would be proper on the occasion; but finding in the Progress of it, that my Information relative to the actual State of Affairs was not sufficiently particular, and in several Respects defective, it became necessary to confine myself to general Remarks. How far the fiscal arrangements require amendments or additions, can best be...
I send you Copies of a Letter of 3 Augt. from Jacob Cuyler, and of my answer of this Date. It is natural for men circumstanced as he is, to be anxious; and as adversity too often begets neglect, marks of attention are doubly acceptable to men in his Situation. I fear you will find it difficult to do much for his Son. A little will to him be much. At any Rate write to him, and let him percieve...
[ New York, July 8, 1791. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from Mr. Jay …” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
Perceiving that you have been pleased to appoint Col. Smith a Supervisor for this District, I conclude that on his acceptance of that place, the office of Marshall will be conferred on some other person. It is probable that Several candidates will offer, and I take the Liberty of communicatg my sentiments respecting a Gentleman who too delicate to display his own merit, possesses more than...
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed, a Packet which I received last Evening from Ab. Ogden Esqr. the Attorney of the united States for New Jersey District. It contains three papers. (1)A Letter from Mr Ogden to me, mentioning the apprehension of a Doctr Freeman, on a charge of forgery &ca and his offer of giving Evidence against others, on an assurance of Pardon. (2)...
I this Day received the enclosed from the Post Office. It is the only Letter that I have received from Mr. Chiappe since I left the Office for foreign Affairs; and as it belongs to that Department I take the earliest Opportunity of transmitting it to you.—I have the Honor to be with great Respect & Esteem Dear Sir your most obt. & hble. servt. RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); endorsed by TJ as...
A weeks Absence on a Visit to my friends at Rye, from whence I returned last Evening, prevented my having ‘till then, the Pleasure of recieving your very obliging Letter of the 20 Decr.— For the Invitation with which you honor me, be pleased to accept my cordial acknowledgements—It is conveyed in Terms which enhance the compliment, & I accept it with that Satisfaction which which Politeness...
New York, December 22, 1790. Recommends that Matthew Clarkson be appointed an inspector of the revenue. ADf , Columbia University Libraries. Clarkson, a resident of New York City, was a regent of the University of the State of New York and a member of the New York Assembly.
New York, December 21, 1790. Recommends John McComb Jr. as “an intelligent sober & industrious young Mechanic.” LS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. McComb was the son of a prominent New York architect and builder. The younger McComb became his father’s assistant in 1783 and began his own career as a builder in 1790.
On returning from Exeter the Evening before the last, I had the pleasure of recg your Letter of the 13th. Instant with the two Copies mentioned in it. Having no apprehension of such Measures, what was to be done? appeared to me to be a Question of some Difficulty as well as Importance. To treat them as very important might render them more so than I think they are. The Author of McFingall...
the act “to regulate Trade and Intercourse with the Indian Tribes”, passed the last Session directs that the “Superintendants and Persons by them licensed, shall be governed in all things touching the sd Trade & Intercourse by such Rules and Regulations as the President shall prescribe &C. —I was lately asked whether any and what arrangements had been made in pursuance of this act? my answer...
The Case which I had Yesterday the Honor of recieving from you gave occasion to the following Remarks & Reflections. Whether the Issue of the Negociations depending between the british & Spanish Courts be Peace or war, it certainly is prudent to anticipate & be prepared for the consequences of either Event. In the present State of Things it would doubtless militate against the Interests of the...
The Case which I had Yesterday the Honor of recieving from you gave occasion to the following Remarks and Reflections. Whether the Issue of the Negociations depending between the british and spanish Courts be Peace or War, it certainly is prudent to anticipate and be prepared for the consequences of either Event. In the present State of Things it would doubtless militate against the Interests...
There does not appear to be a single Circumstance in the Case of the murderer in question, to recommend a Pardon—His own Petition contains no averment of Innocence, no Palliative for Guilt, no complaint of Court Jury or witnesses, nor of the want of witnesses. The Silence of the british cabinet on the Subject of Mr Morris’s Letters marks their Indicision —it may arise from Doubts of what might...
I have now the honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed the extracts requested in your letter to me of the 2d. November last, and am with great respect and esteem &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. At the bottom of this letter is the following: “List of papers mentioned in, and transmitted with the aforegoing letter. No. 1. Abstracts and Extracts from the...
The bearer will herewith deliver to you a Book of accounts transmitted to me by Mr. Jefferson, and which in my opinion should be deposited in your office. With great esteem and regard &c. LC , Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. An asterisk was placed at this point and the words “of Silas Deane” inserted as a footnote. Deane was one of the congressional agents sent to France...
It gives me great Pleasure to address a Letter to you in our own country. Being informed of your having sailed, the Storm a few weeks ago rendered us apprehensive that you might be at least embarrassed on the coast.—I congratulate you very sincerely on your arrival, and join in the general wish that you may consent to remain among us, in the Station to which during your absence and without...
A few days since I received a Letter from Mr. Jefferson, dated at Cowes in the Isle of Wight the 17th. October last, in which he mentioned that he expected to sail from that Place the next Day in a Vessel bound to the Chesapeake, and enclosed a Bill of Lading, a Copy of which I have the Pleasure of herewith sending to you. In case the Packages mentioned in the said Bill of Lading, arrive...
Mr Jay has the honor of informing the President of the United States, that yesterday afternoon he received a letter from Sir John Temple in the following words, vizt “New York 12th of October 1789, Sir. I beg leave to submit in the most respectful manner, the enclosed memorial to the consideration of the Government of the United States. The memorialist informs me he hath in his possession all...
Mr Jay has the Honor of observing to the President, on the Subject of Capt. Tate’s application, That in his opinion no Papers should be given to that Gentleman, from which it might appear, or be inferred, that the Governmt encouraged him going into the Service of the Porte, lest umbrage be given to Russia, and Suspicions of ulterior views excited—that therefore the Idea of giving him only a...
Mr Jay has the honor of transmitting herewith enclosed to the President of the United States, a memorial and a translation of it, from the Marquis de Lotbiniere, a respectable Canadian now here in very indigent circumstances, and who says, with great appearance of truth, that his attachment to the american cause has rendered him so obnoxious to the british government as to render it...
I have at length, my dear Sir, the pleasure of informing you (tho’ not officially) that you have Leave to return, and that Mr. Short is appointed to take charge of the public affairs during your absence. From the Time that your Letter of the 19th. November last was received, Vizt. 10th. February, to the Time that our former Government gave place to the present one, there was not a single Day...
I have the honor of transmitting, herewith enclosed, the copy of Mr V. Berckel’s credentials which I received from him together with a translation of them. Be pleased to name the hour at which you may think proper to receive him, and I will give him notice of it and accompany him—if to-morrow permit me to observe that some hour previous to the levee will be most proper. With perfect respect...
The Day after my last Letter to you of the 14 Inst. was written, Mr Benson informed me that measures were taking by Congress for your accommodation, and I since learn that every thing necessary on that Head has been done. This Circumstance cannot fail of being agreable to You, and for that Reason, as well as the Propriety which marks it, I cannot regret it; tho’ it will deprive me of a...