You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Jay, John

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 45

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Jay, John"
Results 31-60 of 550 sorted by date (descending)
[ Albany, September 20, 1798. On the back of a letter that Hamilton wrote to Jay on September 17, 1798, Jay wrote : “ansd. 20 Sep. 1798.” Letter not found. ]
I was this morning favd. with yours of the 27 Inst: I regret the circumstances which prevented our seeing each other when you was here. There are several Topics on which I wish to converse with you, & particularly respecting military arrangements at N York. The Riffle Corps & a few of the new Light Infantry Companies are established—there were Reasons, which I shall mention when we meet, which...
I have the Honor of transmitting to You, herewith enclosed, an address from the Senate and assembly of this State, which passed and was agreed to by both Houses unanimously — It gives me pleasure to reflect that from this and the numerous other Expressions of the public Sentiment, relative to the reprehensible Conduct of France towards this country, you may rely on the decided Co-operation of...
[ Albany, August 3, 1798. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from Mr. Jay …” to H, Columbia University Libraries.
Mr. David Jones, the Son of the Comptroller, wishes for the Honor of being one of your aids; and (with his fathers approbation) purposes on his arrival at N. York, to wait upon you on the Subject. This young Gentleman has been my private Secretary, and I do him no more than Justice in assuring you, that while with me I was not only satisfied but pleased with his Temper Disposition & Behaviour,...
Since I left N York I have had the Satisfaction of seeing your late appointment announced in the Papers; but I have seen nothing that decides your Rank in Relation to other Majr. Generals. Doubts on such a point ought not to remain. Many will doubtless apply for Commands in the army, & it is to be wished that a judicious Selection may be made. There is a Gentleman (who for your Information I...
I have this Instant recd. a Letter dated the 14th. Instant from Judge Hobart, resigning his Seat in the Senate of the united States, and as our Legislature is not now in Session, it hath become my Duty to appoint a Senator to succeed him and take his place, untill the next Meeting of the Legislature. The present delicate State of our public affairs, and the evident Expediency of filling this...
I wrote you a few Lines this Morning informing you that Judge Hobart had resigned his Seat in the Senate, and that by the next post I should send you a Commission to fill his place. On further Reflection I doubt the propriety of appointing you without your previous permission, and therefore shall postpone it untill I receive your answer. If after well considering the Subject you should decline...
Yours of the 4th Ult: relative to Mr. Richardson, was delivered to me Yesterday. On Mr. Dunscombs Resignation, Col. Troup recommended Mr. Keese to succeed him, and in Terms very explicit. If I recollect right, he had conversed with Mr. Keese on the Subject. Considering the Population of New York, and the Delays which might be caused by the Death Sickness Resignation or absence of the Examiner,...
I Yesterday recd Information that Col. Walker the naval officer for New York, has resigned; and am requested to mention Mr Henry Remson, the Son of the late Mr Henry Remson of that city, as a proper Person to succeed him. I am apprized of the Delicacy of such Recommendations—they too often require a Degree of caution and Reserve, not easy to observe or express with Precision—on this occasion I...
It occurs to me that it may not be perfectly prudent to say that we are never to expect Favors from a nation, for that assertion seems to imply that nations always are , or always ought to be moved only by interested motives. It is true that disinterested Favors are so rare, that on that account they are not to be expected between nations; and if that sentiment turned on that Reason vizt their...
You can have very little Time for private Letters, and therefore I am the more obliged by the one you honored me with on the 31 of last month. I was not without apprehensions that on Enquiry it might not appear adviseable to gratify Mr Pickman’s wishes; for altho’ Integrity and amiable manners are great, yet they are not the only Qualifications for office. Your answer to the Call for Papers,...
Govr Jay presents his respectful Compliments to the president of the United States, & takes the Liberty of sending the enclosed Copy of a Letter which he this Day recd from Mr S. Bayard. AL , DLC:GW . In his letter from London of 6 Jan., Samuel Bayard informed Jay “of the favourable disposition which has lately been evinced both in Court of appeals and of admiralty in cases where our citizens...
In pursuance of a concurrent Resolution of the two Houses of the Legislature of the third and fourth instant I desire You as a Counsellor at Law to defend in behalf of this State a certain Suit brought against Lewis Cornwall by or in behalf of Alexander Colden for the Recovery of a Farm sold to the said Lewis by the Commissioners of Forfeitures for the Southern District. You will herewith...
I was this morning favored with your obliging Letter of the 31 ult.—D’Ivernois is very industrious.—I hear no more of his plan of transplanting the University of Geneva into the united States. He is a sensible diligent man, and I suspect that his Correspondence with Mr Gallatin has done no Harm— It gives me pleasure to find that in your opinion no great mischief will be done by the combustable...
the British Ratification of the Treaty not having arrived and consequently the Time for appointing the Commissioners mentioned in it not being come, I have thus long postponed replying to yours of the 21 of last month. It certainly is important that the Commissioners relative to the Debts, and also the captures, be men the best qualified for those places. Probably it would be adviseable to...
apprehensive that my Letter to you (herewith enclosed) is not exactly such an one, as the Gentleman mentioned in it, may perhaps wish and expect it to be, I think it adviseable to send him a copy of it: and that you may have the more perfect and accurate Information, I enclose a copy of my Letter to him. I have lately received much Intelligence from several Quarters—some allowances are to be...
private Since mine to you of Yesterday I have occasionally turned my Thoughts to the Subject of it. I presume that the Treaty is ratified agreable to the advice of the Senate—and that if Great Britain consents to the Suspension of the 12 art: (which I believe will be the Case) the Treaty will thereupon be ratified on her part and become final. of Consequence that the modification contemplated...
private I have been honored with yours of the 31 of last month. the article in the Treaty to which you allude vizt the last was proposed by me to Lord Grenville, because it seemed probable that when the Treaty should for some time have gone into operation, Defects might become manifest, and further arrangements become desireable which had not occurred to either of us. because no plan of an...
In Compliance with the Request of Sir John Sinclair I have the Pleasure of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Book which I recd. from him two Days ago. As it is now probable that Col. Smith will meet with a greater number of opportunities of sending it than will occur to me, I shall take the Liberty of committing it to his care— Be pleased to present Mrs. Jay & my best Compts. to Mrs....
Two days ago I received from Sir John Sinclair the Book herewith enclosed, which he presents to you and requests me to forward. As its Size forbids its being sent by the post, and there is little Probability of my soon meeting with other opportunities to Virginia, I think it best to forward it to Pha. and beg the favor of Mr. Randolph to convey it to You. I have the Honor to be with great...
The enclosed contains my Resignation of the office of chief Justice —I cannot quit it, without again expressing to You my acknowledgments for the Honor you conferred upon me by that appointment; and for the repeated marks of confidence & attention for which I am indebted to You. It gives me pleasure to recollect and reflect on these circumstances—to endulge the most sincere wishes for your...
My last to you was written on the 25th ult: and is gone in the ohio Capt. Kemp, who sailed last week for New York. It was not untill after my Dispatches were sent to him, that I had the Pleasure of recieving your’s of the 18th of December last. After considering all that I have seen and heard on the subject, it is my opinion that the common and popular (not official) Language and conduct of...
Your very friendly Letter of the 1 Novr last, gratified me not a little. The Insurrection had caused disagreable Sensations in this Country, the objects and Efforts of the Jacobin Societies in america were known here, and the hate of our Government was considered as being involved in that of the Insurrection. The manner in which it has terminated has given sincere Satisfaction to this...
The Design of this Letter is merely for the Purpose of transmitting to You the pamplet herewith enclosed. I recd it (in two parcels) from Doctr Anderson with a Request that I would send it to You; but not knowing who the Bearer will be I omit adding any thing except the most sincere assurances of my remaining with perfect Respect Esteem & attachment Dear Sir your obliged and obt Servt ALS ,...
I wrote you a few Lines last week—This Morning I was favored with two Letters from your Son of the 14 & 20th. of This Month—Parents are gratified by hearing of or from Their children—The former Letter was Dated at The Hague—The latter at amsterdam—He had been recd. and acknowledged by The States General, and on the 14th had “a gracious audience of The Stadtholder.”—In his last Letter there is...
From the Day of my appointment to this mission, my Attention has been much withdrawn from my friends, and confined to the Business which brought me here; & which has at last been terminated by a Treaty. In future I shall have more Leisure to attend to my Friends, and to my own affairs— Both your sons arrived here in good Health. I wrote to my friend John lately, but as yet have not had a...
My Task is done—whether Finis coronat opus, the President Senate and Public will decide. This Letter goes by the Packet, and the Treaty with it. Some parts of it require Elucidation to common Readers. I have not Time for comments. Lord Grenville is anxious to dismiss the Packet. If this Treaty fails, I dispair of another. If satisfactory, care should be taken that public opinion be not misled...
A Letter which I wrote to you on the 29 Octr last contained the following Paragraph vizt. “I am authorized by Lord Grenville to assure you in the most explicit Terms, that no Instructions to stimulate or promote Hostilities by the Indians against the United States, have been sent to the Kings officers in Canada—I am preparing an official Representation to him on this Subject, and he will give...
I have been honored with your’s of the 5th of September. Want of Liesure constrains me to be concise. I am authorized by Lord Grenville to assure you in the most explicit Terms, that no Instructions to stimulate or promote Hostilities by the Indians against the united States have been sent to the Kings officers in Canada. I am preparing an official Representation to him on this Subject, and he...