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On the 20th. August last I had the Pleasure of recieving and communicating to Congress your Favors of the 3d. and 4th. of that month. Be pleased to accept my Congratulations on your safe Return to your Family and Country. Yours of the 27 Feby. and 1st. March last came to Hand about ten Days ago. An Expectation of having Commands from Congress to transmit, induced me to delay writing ’till now....
I have at Length had the Pleasure of recieving your very friendly Letter of the 22d. Feby. last. It has been very long on the Road. Accept my Thanks for your kind Congratulations; and permit me to assure you that I sincerely rejoice in your having safely reached the Place of your Destination on a Business which declares the Confidence of America, and for an Object, in the Attainment of which,...
There is a Destinction between Ceremony and Attention which is not always observed tho often useful. I Of the latter former I hope there will be little of V between us, of the latter much. Public as well as personal Considerations dictate this Conduct, on my Part, and I am happy to find by your favor of the 15 Inst. Ultimo, that you approve it in the same Light mean not to be punctilious. The...
On the 4 June last I had the Pleasure of writing you a Letter acknowledging the Reciept of yours of the 15 May—since which none of your Favors have reached me. I have just been reading the Capitulation of Charles Town. I suspect they wanted Provisions. The Reputation of the Garrison will suffer till the Reasons of their Conduct are explained. I wish a good one may be in their Power. They are...
Since my last to you before you left Paris, I have been favored with no Letters from you except a few Lines sent me by Mr. Montgomery of Alicante, recommending that Gentleman as friendly to our Country. The enclosed is a Copy of an Act of Congress adopting the Regu­ lations proposed by the Empress of Russia, and of which I was desired to transmit Copies to you and Doctr. Franklin. Agreable to...
The two last posts brought me your Favors of the 26 and 28th. Ult. It really gives me great Satisfaction at Length to see a prospect of a regular Correspondence between us. The Failure of my former attempts had almost discouraged me, tho’ from the frequent miscarriage of Letters to and from me, I had Reason to impute your Silence more to that than to any other Cause. I have not recd. a...
I had the Pleasure of recg your favor of the 28 ult. a few Days ago. I congratulate You sincerely on the accession of Friesland and the flattering Prospect there is that the Example of that Province will be followed by that of Holland and the others. It would give me great Satisfaction to be able to transmit you In­ telligence equally agreable, but that is not the Case. Prudence forbids me to...
Many weeks have elapsed since I recd. a Letter from our Country, but a Packet of News papers, which I think must have been sent from the office of the Secretary for foreign affairs, was brought to me by the last Post from Bilboa. They contain nothing very interesting. There is a Paragraph in one of them under the Boston Head which mentions the safe arrival of the Cicero Capt. Hill, and among...
Your friendly Letter of the 8th. Ult. should not have remained so long unanswered, had I not been obliged by Sickness which lasted several Weeks to postpone writing to any of my Correspondents. Mrs. Jay has also been much indisposed—Indeed neither of us have been blessed with much Health since we left America. Your Negociations in Holland have been honorable to yourself as well as useful to...
I am this moment informed of a safe opportunity of conveying you a Letter, and as such another may not soon offer, I must not omit it. My opinion coincides with yours as to the Impropriety of treating with our Enemies on any other than an equal footing. We have told mr Oswald so, and he has sent an Express to London to communicate it, and to require further Instructions. He has not yet recd....
M r. Fitzherbert has just been with me. He will give passports for american merchantmen, on our doing the like for british ones. He informed me that Doct r. Franklin is preparing a number of these Passports, in his own name. As this Business appears to both of us to appertain rather to the american Commissioners for peace, than to the residentiary minister at this or any other Court; would it...
on calling this Moment for my Man Manuel to comb me I am told he is gone to shew my Nephew the Fair— I fear they will have so many fine Things & Raree shows to see and admire, that my Head will remain in statu quo ’till afternoon, & consequently our intended Visit to C t. Sarsfield be postponed. Thus does Tyrant Custom sometimes hold us by a Hair , and thus do ridiculous Fashions make us...
[ Paris ], June 1783. LbC-Tr ’s in Jean L’Air de Lamotte’s hand ( Adams Papers ); APM Reel 103. The two proposals calendared here, one by David Hartley and the other by John Jay, are dated June in the Letterbook, but any effort to arrive at an exact date is problematical. They were likely done sometime after 21 May but prior to Hartley’s letter to the commissioners of 14 June , above, and...
I hope I may by this Time congratulate You on your safe Arrival, and happy meeting with your Son at amsterdam. M r. Laurens is here, & in better Health than I have heretofore seen him since he left America— His Stay will probably be short, for his Permission to return creates Doubts in his Mind as to the Propriety of his continuing to act with us, unless by our particular Request; and M r...
Last night I rec d. your obliging Favor of the 7 Inst. & the Letters mentioned to be enclosed with it— The one for M r Laurens was immediately sent to his Lodgings. The Circumstances you mention are interesting, and will afford matter for Deliberation & Comments when we meet. My Return to London will depend on one of two Things Viz t. on being satisfied that I am to expect little or no Benefit...
D r. Franklin informs me, that in your Passage from England to Holland, you experienced many more difficulties than are common even at this rigid Season. Mine from Dover to Calais, was far from being short or pleasant. Neptune however was less uncivil to me than to You— Neither of us have enjoyed much of his favor: but I will forgive him with all my Heart, if he will let me pass once more in...
We had the honor of receiving your Favour of the 20 th: Inst, and are persuaded that the Communication of the Friendly Disposition of his Prussian Majesty made to you by the Baron de Thuilemeyer will give great Pleasure to Congress. The Respect with which the Reputation of that great Prince has impress’d the United States, early induced them to consider his Friendship as a desirable Object;...
I thank You for your obliging Letter of the 2 d. Inst—& congratulate you on the Recovery of your Health, as well as on the Success of your measures for preserving our Credit, for which you certainly merit the Acknowledgm ts. of the United States in general, and of their Financier in particular. It seems to me that this Climate would be at least as propitious to your Health as that of Holland;...
Your Fav r. of the 20 th. Inst. arrived last Evening— It is not in pursuance of a recent or hasty Resolution, that I am preparing to return: It has been long taken & maturely considered. the public Accounts still detain me, for ’tho’ always kept by M r Carmichael, I do not chuse to leave them unsettled behind me— when that Obstacle ceases, which I expect will be very soon, I shall leave Paris....
We received the Letter you did us the honour of writing to us the 10 th. Inst, with the project of a Treaty that had been transmitted to you by the Baron de Thulemeier, which we have examined, & return herewith, having made a few small Additions or Changes of Words to be proposed, such as Citoyens for Sujets and the like, and intimated some Explanations as wanted in particular Paragraphs. The...
One of these Days I shall devote a Leisure Hour to forming a Cypher, and will send it to You by the first good Conveyance that may afterwards offer. at present I am engaged on many Committees, so that my attendance on them and on Congress, keeps me fully employed. I observe with Pleasure that in this Congress there appears to be good Talents & good Dispositions. none of their more important...
I have now the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Ratification made 1 st Feb y: instant of the contract or Engagement which you entered into as Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America to their High Mightinesses the Lords, the States General of the United Netherlands, in Behalf of the said States, with Mess rs. Wilhelm & Jan Willink & others for a Loan of two...
Duplicate. The United States in Congress Assembled. [ 11 March 1785 ] To all to whom these Presents shall come or be made known send Greeting: Whereas We, reposing special Trust and Confidence in the Integrity, Prudence and Ability of our trusty and well beloved The Honorable John Adams, late one of our Ministers Plenipotentiary for negotiating a Peace, and heretofore a Delegate in Congress...
The enclosed Extracts from the Journal of Congress will inform you of your Appointment to go as Minister to the Court of London, and of M r. Smith’s being elected Secretary to the Legation. I congratulate you on this Event. It argues the Confidence reposed in you by the United States, and I am persuaded will redound to their Advantage as well as to your Reputation.— The necessary Papers are...
The Packet not sailing until to morrow has put in my Power to get your Commission, Instructions and Letter of Credence completed. I also send You in another Parcel, of which M r. Randall is also to take Charge, the Journals printed since those with which I understand you have already been furnished.— With great Esteem & Regard / I am Dear Sir / Your most ob t. & hble. Serv t: RC and enclosure...
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed, a certified Copy of an Act of Congress of the 21 st. Instant, instructing you to communicate to M r. S t. Saphorin, the high Sense, the United States in Congress assembled, entertain of the liberal Decision made by his Danish Majesty, on the Question proposed to his Minister by You, respecting the Ordination of american Candidates for...
I had the Honor of writing to you on the 15 th: March last mentioning your Appointment to the Court of London; on the 18 th: of the same Month enclosing your Commission, Instructions and Letter of Credence and sending with it the Journals of Congress necessary to compleat your Set; and on the 31 st: March I wrote you another Letter with an Act of Congress directing you to communicate to M r. S...
I have had the Honor to receive and communicate to Congress your Letters of 15 th: December 1784 13 }  April 1785 24 4 May 5 May 7 May 8 May 13 May 29 May which enclosed your Correspondence with Lord Carmarthen.— 30 May & 1 June.— 24 April. Congress are pleased to hear that you have compleated the Loan in Holland; but have not directed me to say any Thing of opening a new one. I wish I could...
My last to you was of the 26 th: Ultimo, in which I mentioned the Dates of the Letters with which you had honored me, and the Receipt of which then remained unacknowledged—none from you have since arrived.— I have now the Honor of transmitting to You herewith enclosed a Copy of an Act of Congress of the 18 th: Ultimo— it contains a Correspondence between the Governor of Massachusetts and Cap...
Since the Date of my last to you which was the 6 th: September last, I have been honored with yours of the 10 th: & 26 th: June, and 19 th: & 29 th: July with the Papers mentioned to be enclosed. They are now before Congress, and I am persuaded that the strong Marks they bear of Industry and Attention will give them Pleasure.— I perfectly concur with you in Sentiment respecting what ought to...
My last to you was of the 14 th: Ult: by the Ship Betsey Cap t. Thomas Watson—since that time, I have had the Pleasure of receiving and laying before Congress your Dispatches of 6 th , 8 th , & 10 th: August last.— We concur so perfectly in Sentiment respecting public Affairs and what ought to be done, that I find no Occasion to enlarge on those Heads.— In a late Report I have called the...
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed an Act of Congress of the 13 th: Ult: respecting british Claims and Encroachments on our Eastern Boundaries, and instructing and authorising you to take proper Measures for amicably settling the Disputes thence arising. You will also find herewith enclosed the several Papers & Documents referred to in that Act, and of which a List is...
The enclosed Letter from President Lee to you (of the Subject and Contents of which I am informed) will explain to you the Design of the Letters and papers which accompany this. The one to the archbishops of York and Canterbury are left open for your Information; and that you may the more easily determine with yourself either to deliver it in Person, or merely to forward it by a proper...
Congress on Wednesday last made a House and chose M r. Hancock President but he being absent they appointed M r. Ramsay of South Carolina to fill the Chair for the present.— A considerable Time had elapsed during which a sufficient Number of States to proceed on Business were not represented— In this Interval I had the Pleasure of receiving your Letters of 25 th: 28 th: 29 th: 30 th: & 31 st:...
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Copy of a Letter of the 21 st: December from M r: Temple to me, which I laid before Congress. They have been pleased to direct that you communicate it to His Britannic Majesty— That you inform him, that the Complaint stated in it, being in general Terms, and unsupported by any particular Facts, or Evidence, they do not think it...
I lately wrote you a few hasty Lines just as the vessel which carried them was departing; and enclosed a Pamphlet containing my Correspondence with a M r Littlepage, who was formerly in my Family. The attack which produced that Pamphlet, was not only countenanced but stimulated by some of the Subjects of our good allies here. It is no Secret either to You or me that I am no favorite with them:...
My last to You was written the 2 d. Ult:— It acknowledged the Receipt of your Letters of 15. 17. 21. 25 & 27 th: October last—no others have since arrived. All those as well the Letters which accompanied your Draft of a Treaty with Britain, together with my Reports in favor of them and of that Draft are … under the Consideration of Congress, and as yet have produced no Instructions to you on...
I lately sent you five or six copies of the last Edition of my Pamphlet. I then supposed it to be correct, but have since discovered in it the Errors mentioned in the inclosed note— be pleased to correct it accordingly. we are well tho not officially informed that all the States have granted the Impost to Congress, except new York, in whose Legislature there is a strong Party against it. You...
{It is the pleasure of Congress that you protract your negotiations with the Court of great Britain respecting the posts which should have been before this surrendered to the United States, and other infractions of the said Treaty by that power—so as to avoid demanding a categorical Answer respecting the same untill the further orders of Congress—} I have the Honor to be with great Respect / D...
Since the 22 d. February which was the Date of my last Letter to You, I have been honored with yours of the 4. 5. and 11 Novem r. and 2. 6. 9. 12. and 15 and one of    Decem r. last, and also of 4 th. 21. and 26. January 1786. All of them have been laid before Congress, from whom I have no Instructions to say any thing more on the Subjects of them than what you will find in my Letter to you of...
I have been favored with your Letter in which you mention M r Warren. Your opinion of that Gentleman, added to the Merits of his Family, cannot fail to operate powerfully in his Favor. I have communicated that Letter to M r King, an able & valuable Delegate from Massachusets; who I have Reason to think wishes well to you, and to all who like You, deserve well of their Country. our Friend Gerry...
My last to You was dated 4 th: Ult:, since which I have been honored with several from you viz t. two dated 24 th. November last —9. 16. 17. 20. 22. 26 & 27 th. February and 4 th. March last —all of which with their several Enclosures were immediately laid before Congress.— I have at length the Pleasure of informing you that nine States begin to be frequent in Congress, and consequently that...
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed, a Copy of a Report on the Case of the Brig Jane and Elizabeth of Portsmouth in New Hampshire seized by a british man of War at Barbadoes; together with Copies of the Papers on that Subject annexed to it.— The Conduct of the Captain of the Boreas as stated in these Papers appears very exceptionable, but unfortunately for the Brig, her...
I wrote to you on the 7 th: of last Month, and also on the 18 th: of this enclosing some Papers respecting an american Vessel seized at Barbadoes by a british Man of War. I have been honored with yours of 16 th. 25 th. and 28 th. May and 6 th. June last, which with the Papers accompanying them were immediately laid before Congress.— The Situation in which the Want of an adequate Representation...
The Rev d. Doctor Provost is so obliging as to take Charge of this Letter together with other Dispatches which he will deliver to you.— This Gentleman being elected by the Convention of episcopal Congregations in this State, and having the most express Recommendations from that Body, as well as from a general Convention lately held at Wilmington, is going over to be consecrated a Bishop.—...
My last to you was dated 4 th: Ult: since which I have been honored with yours of the 15 th. July last, which was immediately communicated to Congress.— My Report on the Answer of the british Minister to your Memorial respecting our frontier Posts is under the Consideration of Congress. Your Ideas and mine on those Subjects very nearly correspond, and I sincerely wish that you may be enabled...
accept my thanks for your Letter mentioning the Marriage of your Daughter, and my cordial Congratulations on that pleasing Event.— they who best know the Col l: speake of him as brave and honorable; and Strangers to the Lady draw the most favorable Inferences from her Parentage, and from the attention and Example of a Mother whose charater is very estimable. I sincerely wish my dear Friend...
I cannot omit this Opportunity of transmitting to You a Copy of an Act of Congress respecting M r. Temple. It appears to me to be a proper one—In my Opinion our public Conduct should be just and liberal on the one Hand, but firm and decided on the other.— I have the Honor to be with very sincere Esteem and Regard / Dear Sir / Your most ob t. Serv t.
I have the Honor of transmitting to you herewith enclosed a Copy of a Letter of the 21 st. December from M r: Temple to me, which I laid before Congress. They have been pleased to direct that you communicate it to His Britannic Majesty—That you inform him, that the Complaint stated in it, being in general Terms, and unsupported by any particular Facts, or Evidence, they do not think it...
private I lately wrote you a few hasty Lines just to as the vessel which carried them was departing; and inclosed and a Pamphlet containing my Correspondence with a M r Littlepage, who was formerly in my Family. The attack which produced that Pamphlet, was not only countenanced but stimulated by some of the Subjects of our good allies here. It is no Secret either to You or me that I am no...