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The Secretary of the Commission by appointment waited on the Duke of Dorset & delivered to him two Letters from the American Ministers dated the 28 th instant: whereupon the British Ambassador desired M r Humphreys to inform the Ministers of the United States, “that being entirely unacquainted with the negotiations proposed through M r Hartley to the Court of London, he could say nothing on...
By the papers which I have the honor to enclose to your Excellency herewith you will be informed that I have received official Instructions to procure the several honorary presents which have been voted by Congress to different officers in their service during the late war, together with a Draft on M. Grand Banker at Paris for the amount of the expence —but I must beg leave further to inform...
I write this to request information of you, what is necessary, right, & proper to be done by me on saturday next— You can doubtless tell, Sir, whether it is expected & wished that the whole diplomatic Corps should, be at Versailles on New-year’s day, or whether the concourse will probably be so great as that the presence of the smaller limbs of that great Body may readily be dispensed with— I...
Colonel Smith has been so good as to take charge of a printed copy of M r Dwight’s Poem and a letter from that gentleman to your Excellency, which I found at my return from London had been forwarded under cover to me. He is also the bearer of a manuscript copy of M r Barlow’s Vision of Columbus together with letters from the Author and our friend M r Trumbull on the subject of its publication....
I hope Your Excellency, as well as your most worthy Colleague in the Commission to which I am attached as Secretary, will approve of my proposed return to America in the Spring, for the reasons I have already had the honour of suggesting in conversation; and that, in this case, I may be the bearer of a joint or seperate letters from M r. Jefferson & yourself purporting that I have not left...
Colonel Smith has been so good as to take charge of a printed copy of M r Dwight’s Poem and a letter from that gentleman to your Excellency, which I found at my return from London had been forwarded under cover to me. He is also the bearer of a manuscript copy of M r Barlow’s Vision of Columbus together with letters from the Author and our friend M r Trumbull on the subject of its publication....
On Saturday next, the President proposes to go, with Mrs Washington and his family, to view the remains of the old fortifications near Kingsbridge. He has understood from Mrs Washington that Mrs Adams was desirous of gratifying her curiosity on the same subject. If you should find it convenient to make the ride, with Mrs Adams and your family, he will be happy in the pleasure of all your...
It was only by the arrival of a vessel yesterday from America that we received the certain intelligence of your Election as President of the United States. On which auspicious occasion permit me to offer my sincere congratulations & assurances of support (in whatever situation I may be) to an Administration, which, in my anticipation, will not be less glorious to yourself than beneficial to...
I request your indulgence for presenting to you Mr. Henry Preble, a native of the State of Massachusetts, who, I expect, will have the honour of delivering this letter. This Gentleman has suffered infinite vexations and great losses from a long & troublesome process in the Maritime Tribunals of this Country. And there is little or no expectation that he can ever obtain any compensation for his...
A combination of circumstances having prevented me from having the honour of paying my respects in person to Mrs Adams & yourself, I could not proceed on my journey to the Westward, without expressing in this manner my extreme sensibility of the disappointment. When I was in this Town, a few weeks ago, on my way to the Province of Main, I so fully indulged the expectation of making the visit,...
I had fully intended to have paid my personal respects to you on Saturday last, had not the unfavorable change in the state of the roads prevented. That mode of communication having failed, I have now to offer the best homage of Mrs Humphreys & myself to Mrs Adams & yourself, and to request the honour of your company at dinner with us, on Saturday next, it being the anniversary of the Birth of...
I think we agree in sentiment, that the wealth & prosperity of a Country depend essentially on the Industry , Instruction & Morality of its Inhabitants : on the first for acquiring, and on the two last for making the best use of the means, for public felicity. Nor shall we differ in opinion, that the acquisition
Mr Frans Coffin, who will have the honour of delivering this letter, & whom I beg leave to recommend to your friendly notice, as a Gentleman desirous of getting a Passage to St Petersburg, by the Cartel–Ship, about to sail from Philadelphia, if practicable. He is a brother to my friend Mrs Darby; and has, also, a brother who has been for some years past in Russia. His principal object in...
Our friend Col Wadsworth has communicated to me a letter in which you made enquiries respecting a political letter that has lately circulated in this State. I arrived in this Town yesterday & have since conversed with several intelligent persons on the subject. It appears to have been printed in a Fairfield Paper as long ago as the 25th of July. I have not been able to trace it to its source....
After your public Audience was concluded on the 23d of Deer the President of Congress took me aside, and requested, “if any thing should occur to me in consequence of what had just been suggested in favor of the Gentlemen of General Washington’s family who had continued with him to that moment, that I would communicate it to him in a Letter,” and further observed, that he should take great...
I arrived at this place just a Month from the time of my leaving Mount Vernon, perfectly free from Misadventures, altho’ attended with disagreeable roads & the coldest weather I ever experienced—in my route I had the pleasure of executing all your commands, except that of delivering your verbal Message to Govr Clinton, this, the impracticability of passing the Hudson below Kings-ferry...
A few hours after your departure, I received a private communication from a friend in Congress informing me of my appointment as Secretary to the Commissioners for forming Commercial Treaties in Europe —Tho’ pleased with the information I considered myself as unfortunate in not having recd the Letter while your Excellency remained in Town—because I wished to avail myself of Letters of...
You may be surprised, tho I dare say you will not be displeased to receive a Letter from me, dated at a moment when you would have supposed I had already traversed at least one half of the Atlantic—The occasion of my having yet to embark is this—Governor Jefferson on his tour to the eastern States informed me (in Connecticut) of the arrival of a french Packet at New York, in which he proposed...
Finding there was a Vessel in this port destined for Virginia, I could not take my departure for Paris without informing my dear General of my safe arrival in france after a most delightful passage of twenty four days; and as I cannot give a better discription of the excellent accomodations & beautiful weather which we have had during the whole of our voyage, than I have already given in a...
A direct opportunity for America having offered itself thro’ the medium of Colo. Franks I again indulge myself in writing to my dear General; and take the most heartfelt satisfaction in acknowledging the receipt of the Dispatches which were so obligingly addressed for me to the care of Govr Jefferson—who arrived in this City about ten days before me. Tho I dare not undertake to say in this...
I was obliged to close my last Letter of the 18th of Augst so abruptly that I had not even time to tell you how much satisfaction it would afford me, should I be able by my communications to contribute in any degree to your amusement or information, as you were pleased to intimate—permit me now to assure you, that the delightful employment of thus conversing with my dearest General, under the...
Colonel le Maire who is this moment Setting off for Virginia affords an opportunity for communicating the latest & most important intelligence respecting European politics. The Emperor & the Dutch have gone so far in their quarrel about the navigation of the Scheld that there is hardly a possibility that either should recede—indeed the act of recalling their Ministers amounts in the estimation...
There is no great alteration in the complexion of the political world since I had the honour of addressing you last, except that there appears to be more probability that the contest between the Emperor & the Dutch will be accomodated without bloodshed, than there did at that period—preparations for war are however continued, & the Count de Maillebois—Leiut. Gen. in the Armies of France, now...
Since I had the honor to receive by the last Packet your favor dated in Feby last I have been unwell with a slight fever, & tho recovered at this moment it has retarded my public business in such a manner, as will prevent me from writing so particularly as I wished to have done by the present opportunity. I am extremely concerned & mortified to find that you have been under the necessity of...
I cannot permit M. Houdon to depart for Mt Vernon without being the bearer of a line from me. I am very happy Mr Jefferson has been able to procure him to make the voyage, because I am persuaded he will be able to transmit an excellent likeness of you to the remotest ages. He is considered as one of the ablest statuaries in Europe & has performed some capital peices for the Empress of Russia....
Being uncertain whether this letter will arrive at Bourdeaux in time to be carried to America by the vessel which brought me your favour of the 25th of July, I will content myself with assuring you how deeply I am penetrated by those expressions of confidence & friendship with which it is replete. Whether I should, or should not be at liberty to accept the liberal offer you make I cannot at...
I wrote to you by the ship which brought me your affectionate favour of the 25th of July; since which I have been honoured by the receipt of your letters of the 1st of Septr & 30th of Octr—they reached me a few days ago in this city, where I have been about two months. You may naturally expect I should give some little account of this great wonder of the world and the reception I have...
My last letter to you, My dear General, was dated in Febry at London and forwarded by Captain Clagget late of the Maryland line, in that I had the honor of informing you of my intention to return to America in the Spring, in this I have the pleasure to announce my safe arrival from L’Orient after a pleasant passage of 32 days—I am charged with Compliments & messages for your Excellency on the...
I had the pleasure, before I left New York, to receive your favor containing the enclosures respecting Asgil’s affair, and am taking measures for their publication —Interested, as I feel myself in your wellfare & happiness, I could not but be extremely affected by the account of your ill-health; and beg you will let me know in what condition your health is, as I shall not find myself at ease...
I wrote your Excellency some time ago from Hartford & enclosed you the draft of a letter on the subject we talked of when I left Mount Vernon. I hope you have duly received it, tho’ I shall not be free from anxiety until I know with certainty that has been the case. When I wrote that letter, I was in hopes that it might have been in my power before this time, to give you a favorable account of...