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I take the liberty of introducing Mr: Pollard of Boston, a gentleman of considerable literary taste & acquirements, who is travelling for the first time as far South as the City of Washington. His object is to see the Country & become somewhat more acquainted with its Inhabitants. Your pardoning this liberty is the rather to be hoped for, from a consideration of my not having before trespassed...
Mr Frans Coffin, who will have the honour of delivering this letter, & whom I beg leave to recommend to your friendly notice, as a Gentleman desirous of getting a Passage to St Petersburg, by the Cartel–Ship, about to sail from Philadelphia, if practicable. He is a brother to my friend Mrs Darby; and has, also, a brother who has been for some years past in Russia. His principal object in...
The formidable British fleet, now on this Station, could not have been more ill contrived than it is, for the purposes designed. The frigates are unable to contend singly with ours, without being made to feel their inferiority in more than one article. The Ships of the Line, too heavy & clumsy for pursuit, from their bulk & construction & under the disadvantage of having been a considerable...
Mr. Jacob Perkins of Newbury Port will have the honour of delivering this letter into your hand. He is the author of several ingenious and useful inventions. As such I beg leave to introduce him; with the farther information, that the object of his journey is to obtain from Congress the renewal of a Patent about to expire; and that I have given him a Certificate expressive of my opinion of the...
Not finding it convenient, on account of the late severe snow storm and consequent bad roads, to visit the seat of Government, so soon as I had expected, I inclose the Paper alluded to in my late letter; believing the importance of the subject, will be admitted as an apology for the trouble. It is known that the growing of wool and the means of converting that indispensable staple into Cloth,...
As it is not among the least of the important duties of the President, to become acquainted so far as may be, with the resources & ability of the U. S. for supplying their wants; it has been judged not improper to bring to his view a Statement made by the Visitors of the Humphreysville Manufacturing Establishment, respecting the operation of a new Machine for spinning Yarn of various kinds. If...
I think we agree in sentiment, that the wealth & prosperity of a Country depend essentially on the Industry , Instruction & Morality of its Inhabitants : on the first for acquiring, and on the two last for making the best use of the means, for public felicity. Nor shall we differ in opinion, that the acquisition
I have seen the letter which you addressed to a Gentleman in this City during my absence requesting him to obtain Cloth from my Factory for your own weaving. There is no broad Cloth finished at present except some Pecies made of the Wool of the half-blooded Merinos. I have directed one to be manufactured of the pure fleece. It will not be completed in less than six weeks or two months; owing...
I have the honor to enclose to you a letter from our friend Genl. Lafayette, which he put into my hand at Paris. Dispatches from Mr. Monroe will also be forwarded by this conveyance with which I was charged in London. The last advices which we have brought from thence were to the 16th. Ulto., When the arrival of the American Sloop of War, Revenge, was anxiously expected, as was the...
I have just arrived here in a passage of 34 days from England. I take the liberty of communicating some of the most remarkable circumstances of a political nature which occurred at the time of my departure. After the general embargo was raised, the objects which excited the public attention most, were, the expected arrival of Instructions from the U.S. respecting the late aggression on our...
As I have some expectation of returning to Europe in the course of this Year, it will be particularly interesting to me to know the destination of the Diamonds which the Queen of Spain sent as a present to me; after my departure from that Country. If there be any difficulty in remitting them to me from a supposition of their having been destined to my Husband, I request reference may be had to...
I had fully intended to have paid my personal respects to you on Saturday last, had not the unfavorable change in the state of the roads prevented. That mode of communication having failed, I have now to offer the best homage of Mrs Humphreys & myself to Mrs Adams & yourself, and to request the honour of your company at dinner with us, on Saturday next, it being the anniversary of the Birth of...
I had the honour to receive, upon my return to this Place, your letter dated the 14th of April last; in which you informed me, that the Accounts of Messrs John Bulkeley & Son had been adjusted at the Treasury. I immediately sent an extract of yours to that House; and I doubt not you will have forwarded the same statement. This prevents me from trespassing on your time with any remark, altho I...
29 March 1803, New York. “In compliance with a request from Mr. Thomas Bulkeley of Lisbon, now conducting the Commercial House of Messrs John Bulkeley & Son, I have the honour to forward to you the enclosed letter, which has just come to my hand. The subject of the claim of that House on the Department of State being so fully explained, I cannot doubt that a satisfactory arrangement will be...
In referring to that part of the letter addressed by me, on the 28th. of June last, to the President of the U.S., which relates to the measures I took to avoid recieving without the consent of Congress the Royal Present usually offered to Ambassadors & Ministers who had resided near H.C.M. ; I now hasten to give information that Mr. Codman has brought from Europe to this Country a small...
A combination of circumstances having prevented me from having the honour of paying my respects in person to Mrs Adams & yourself, I could not proceed on my journey to the Westward, without expressing in this manner my extreme sensibility of the disappointment. When I was in this Town, a few weeks ago, on my way to the Province of Main, I so fully indulged the expectation of making the visit,...
I had fully determined, upon my arrival in the U.S. , to have made a journey to the City of Washington, for the express & sole purpose of paying my respects to the President. But the fatigue & inconvenience which my wife suffered in our voyage from Europe prevented me from carrying that determination into effect; especially as She was unable to accompany me & unwilling to be left alone among...
28 December 1801, Madrid. No. 299. Transmits information just received from Swedish chargé that three Swedish frigates arrived at Málaga on 20 Dec. and after making some repairs they will proceed to blockade Tripoli. Hopes this measure will reduce the Barbary powers to reason. Reports that the American consul at Málaga has complained that American vessels arriving there have been placed under...
In requesting you to be referred to my letter dated the 18th inst:, I have now the pleasure to inform you that Mr Pinckney is considerably better in health than he was at that date. I enclose to you herewith the Sentence of the Supreme Council of War, in the Case of the Ship South Carolina, Paul Post Master, detained first by an English frigate, recaptured by a Spanish & French armed force,...
18 December 1801, Madrid. No. 297. Recounts 9 Dec. meeting at the Escorial with Charles Pinckney, when Pinckney delivered to him JM’s dispatch of 22 June enclosing the president’s letter to the Spanish king and instructions for his own departure. Will comply with instructions, “although it cannot escape your reflection … that it is very inconvenient & unfortunate for me to have received these...
4 December 1801, Madrid. No. 296. Has had no news of Commodore Dale since he sailed from Málaga. Encloses copy of a 1 Nov. circular letter from Appleton “received this day” advising that the Tripolitans have purchased a twenty-two-gun ship at Smyrna for the purpose of cruising against Americans. Concludes from a 30 Nov. letter from Pinckney at Vitoria that he will arrive in the next week....
23 November 1801, Madrid. No. 295. The “almost incessant occupation” of preparing representations to the first minister of state has prevented him from sending copies to the State Department. Encloses now copies of protest he made regarding Spanish insults to Captain Bainbridge of the Essex and U.S. consul Willis at Barcelona as well as a remonstrance at the refusal of commander at San Roque...
20 November 1801, Madrid. No. 294. Encloses copies of an official Spanish letter of 27 Oct., distributed on 17 Nov. to announce ratification of peace preliminaries between Great Britain and France, and his response. At the celebration of the king’s birthday at the Escorial, he discussed recent Spanish captures of American merchantmen with the first minister of state, who promised to attend to...
9 November 1801, Madrid. No. 293. Has been informed that the pasha of Tripoli is having three corsairs fitted out at Mahón with Minorcan crews and British papers and colors to evade American frigates. Has sent circular letter with that news to U.S. consuls in adjacent Spanish ports for the information of American naval commanders and civilians. In a 4 Nov. letter Kirkpatrick stated he would...
6 November 1801, Madrid. No. 292. Has received a 12 Oct. letter from Pinckney in Paris stating that he is delayed by an eye ailment; he requested Humphreys to transfer legation records to his secretary of legation, assuming he had arrived from America, should Humphreys wish to leave Spain. Humphreys replied that he had no news of the secretary’s arrival and doubted the wisdom of an Atlantic...
With my last Dispatch of the 13th. instant, I forwarded Copies of the Preliminaries of Peace, as signed at London on the 1st. day of this Month, between the Ministers of England and France. In a Postscript to the Duplicate of the same, dated the 16th. instant, I informed you, I had received a letter that day from Consul OBrien at Algiers, in which he mentioned that a Revolt had existed for a...
7 October 1801, Madrid. No. 289. Forwards dispatches sent to Smith at Lisbon from consuls in Barbary States, which Smith before his departure had arranged for Humphreys to receive. In addition, encloses translation of letter from captain of Swedish frigate Thetis to the Swedish chargé at Madrid advising him of royal orders to join with Americans against Tripoli. Has learned from Patrick...
30 September 1801, Madrid. No. 288. Has been informed secretly that France and Portugal signed a peace treaty in Madrid the night before. Believes the conditions are very onerous for Portugal and the agreement was extorted under threat of invasion. In postscript of 1 Oct., reports that five days before the treaty was signed the French army had been given orders to invade Portugal and that...
24 September 1801, Madrid. No. 287. Has formally notified minister of state of American blockade of Tripoli; encloses copy of that note and minister’s reply. Confirms news of victory of the Enterprize over Tripolitan corsair, quoting from a 19 Aug. report by Commodore Dale. Notes that Portugal continues to delay peace negotiations with France. Plans to send his accounts by an American citizen...
The information contained in the Post-script of my letter, of the 1st. instant from St. Ildefonso, that Grand Cairo had surrendered to the English and Turkish armies, has been confirmed. As this letter may possibly have a speedy conveyance by a Vessel which is ready to sail for the United States from Bilbao, I enclose a French Gazette, containing the capitulation, and likewise the Treaty...