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I did not trouble you with a letter from Savannah, because our public Dispatch to the Secretary at War would inform you of our proceedings to that time. Besides the oppressive nature of the intollerable heat & the exertion we were obliged to make to get forward on our journey, occasioned such a relaxation & consequent sickness as rendered me almost incapable of writing. We are all now well....
Finding an opportunity to Augusta, I could not excuse myself from giving you the progress of our negotiation since my last. On monday last (that is to say the day after the arrival of Genl Lincoln & myself) a deputation from all the Creeks of the Tuccasee, the Hallowing & the Tellasee Kings, waited upon us, to congratulate us on our arrival, to express in general terms their desire for peace,...
Since I had the honor of writing to you yesterday, some things have happened, of which I conceive it expedient to give information by this conveyance. On the evening of the 25th McGillivray omitted to comply with his positive promise to write to us or come over the river, in order to explain the objections of the Chiefs to the Project of the Treaty which we had proposed to them, and to propose...
Seventeen Miles east of Camden [S.C.] My dear Genl Octr 13th 1789. Having been led to believe that this route was the shortest & best, we left Augusta this day week; and having now an opportunity by Charles Town, I write (in conformity to the intimation you was pleased to give) for the purpose of keeping you advised of our progress. From the Savannah at Augusta to the Congaree at Friday’s...
I am taking occasion by a water conveyance to inform you, that we are thus far on our way to New York. But my principal object is to mention the political intelligence which we obtained in North Carolina. The prevailing opinion in that State (so far as we could ascertain it from repeated enquiries) is, that the Constitution will be adopted. However, many of those who are opposed to it think...
I am commanded by the President of the United States of America to send to you some Papers which have just come to him, and which are of a nature highly interesting to the Community. His object is to avail himself of your opinion, relative to the measures which should be adopted in consequence of this Communication. I have the honor to be with perfect respect &c. N.B. the above letter was from...
I take the liberty to put under cover to you a letter for Mr Manley the Engraver in Philadelphia, who is about to strike the Medal containing your likeness. At the moment when I was leaving New York he asked me for my opinion on the subject, and requested that I would write to him as soon as I might find it convenient—which I promised. In case there should be any thing erroneous in the Model,...
On Saturday next, the President proposes to go, with Mrs Washington and his family, to view the remains of the old fortifications near Kingsbridge. He has understood from Mrs Washington that Mrs Adams was desirous of gratifying her curiosity on the same subject. If you should find it convenient to make the ride, with Mrs Adams and your family, he will be happy in the pleasure of all your...
On Saturday next, the President proposes to go, with Mrs Washington and his family, to view the remains of the the old fortifications near Kingsbridge. He has understood from Mrs Washington that Mrs Adams was desirous of gratifying her curiosity on the same subject. If you should find it convenient to make the ride, with Mrs Adams and your family, he will be happy in the pleasure of all your...
In taking leave of you, at the moment of your departure while I strove in vain to check an impulse which I apprehended betrayed too much weakness, I found the burden on my heart choaked the passage of utterance. In that moment a multitude of ideas crouded into my mind. A long seperation from one’s friends & country, under an idea of going into a nation where one is a total stranger, however...
After a passage of five weeks, the four first of which were very tempestuous, I arrived in the Channel. In order to save time, and slip into London with the less probability of being noticed, I procured a boat from the shore to land me at Dover. From that place I took my passage in the Mail Coach, and arrived here at 6 O’Clock this morning. Having delivered the Dispatches to Mr. Johnson, and...
In my first letter, I mentioned such circumstances of a political nature, relating to several of the principal Powers of Europe, as had then come to my knowledge. The facts, according to subsequent informations, were pretty justly stated. Leaving you to deduce such conclusions as your better judgment shall enable you to form, I proceed now to give you the sequel of intelligence which has...
The Russian Minister at this Court has received an authentic account from the Minister of his Nation at Vienna of the naval victory gained by the fleet of the Empress over that of the Porte. Of the latter the Admiral’s ship was destroyed, two smaller ships taken, and the rest very much shattered and obliged to fly. The English affect to say this event will protract the war, by making the...
While I am detained for the sailing of the vessel in which I am to go to Lisbon; I cannot do better, in my judgment, than to give you such farther facts, occurrences, or reports of the day, as may be in any degree interesting, in America, when compared with other accounts: though those I may have the honor to give should not be of much importance in themselves.—In my communications, I have...
(Secret) My dear General London Octr 31st 1790. Since my arrival here, on the 14th inst., I have written four letters to Mr Jefferson, by different conveyances, in which I have given him a detail of such political facts & reports as I supposed might be in any degree, interesting in America. As these communications will be submitted to your inspection, I forebear troubling you with any...
The vessel, in which I have engaged my passage, attempted to go down the river at the time appointed: but contrary winds have prevented, so that she cannot before this evening reach Gravesend. For which place I shall proceed immediately by land. I have the honor to enclose a Paper containing a translation of the Correspondence between the King of France and his Ministers, consequent to the...
Letter not found: from David Humphreys, 4 Nov. 1790. Frank Landon Humphreys claimed that before his vessel “finally left England, Col. Humphreys sent a letter to Gen. Washington from Gravesend on November 4.” This could have been, however, the letter Humphreys had written to the president four days earlier (see Humphreys, Life and Times of David Humphreys, Francis Landon Humphreys. Life and...
The only object of this letter is to inform you, that I have been unavoidably detained by the weather until the present moment; in which I am embarking. Nothing has yet transpired to enable one to form a definitive conclusion, whether the great hostile preparations will terminate in war. Notwithstanding the Public continues to be amused and deluded, with pompous accounts, in all the Papers, of...
I came on shore yesterday evening, and hearing a vessel is to sail for England before the Packet, I write with the design of sending this letter by that conveyance. We made the passage from Gravesend to the Rock of Lisbon in a fortnight, during which time we had favorable winds and fine weather, for the season.—The forms to be passed through in entering the vessel, and the impediments I shall...
(Secret) My Dear General Lisbon Nov 30th 1790. I have forwarded to Mr Jefferson for your information the continuation of my Proceedings until the present time. You will be pleased to observe by my letter to him of this date, that the Court of Lisbon, having, from a desire of opening an official intercourse with the U.S., made the first advances by appointing a Minister Resident to repair...
As soon as my baggage was landed, I wrote a note to M. de Pinto, advising that I was charged with the delivery of a letter from you to him, and requesting the honor of being informed at what time it would be convenient for His Excellency to receive it. To this he gave an extremely polite answer, and fixed upon the 25th of this Month at his House in Junqueira. I accordingly waited on him, and,...
It was not until the 3d of this Month that I was able to obtain my Passports and have every thing in readiness to leave Lisbon; nor until yesterday to arrive here, although I travelled constantly from daylight to dark, making only one stop of about an hour in the middle of the day. After much difficulty, delay and vexation the papers are delivered safely to their Address. I shall not write any...
I have had, Sir, many conversations with Mr. Carmichael on the subject of your letter to him. If it had arrived early in summer, he thinks we might have obtained all our wishes. Then the critical state of affairs induced the Comte de Florida Blanca to throw out those general assertions that we should have no reason to complain of the conduct of this court with respect to the Mississippi, which...
I have employed my time here in communicating according to instructions the sentiments of the President on the navigation of the Missisipi, and other important points. Mr. Carmichael’s ideas are just; his exertions will be powerful and unremitting to obtain the accomplishment of our desires before his departure from this country: the task will now be difficult, if not impracticable, from the...
On the 24th. of Janry. I left Madrid, and arrived here this day. I remained a week beyond the time I had prescribed myself, in order that Mr. Carmichael might have an opportunity of confering fully with the Compte de Florida Blanca, after the King’s return from hunting at Aranjuez. We were, however, disappointed in the expectation of sounding that Minister; for at the time when Mr. Carmichael...
The postponement of the sailing of the Vessel by which I wrote on the 6th instant affords me an opportunity of continuing my Correspondence to this day. Since I had the honor of addressing you last, a Packet has arrived from England in five days passage, and yesterday the ordinary Post came in with the Mails from different parts of the Continent. The summary of Intelligence received through...
Although it is impossible for a stranger, in merely travelling through a country & remaining only a few weeks in its capital, to give a complete account of the state of affairs & system of policy in it; yet he may have opportunities of collecting some informations which will be perhaps entertaining, if not useful, to Persons in public life at a distance. Under this idea, in consequence of your...
I do not wait to become fully acquainted with the commercial intercourse which subsists between the United States and Portugal, before I resume the subject mentioned in my letter of the 19th of Novr. last, so far as relates to the manner in which our trade has been managed here, since the year 1783. Immediately after the war, upon the arrival of the first vessels from America, there appeared...
Mafra, 31 Mch. 1791. He received packet last night from Mr. Bulkeley and information of a vessel departing for Alexandria in a few days, hence he sends this by a servant to Lisbon. Having accounts from America as late as 10 Feb. and not being advised by “the Department of foreign affairs” of receipt of any of his letters, he fears their detention or miscarriage. He gives their dates to show it...
Mafra, 8 Apr. 1791 . In France uncommon agitation produced by journey of king’s aunts to Rome. Great tumults in Paris. Repairing of Chateau de Vincennes, effort of mob to destroy it, and resultant confrontation with the national guard. Another dangerous affair at the Tuileries, involving misunderstanding between Lafayette and the mayor. “The Marquis is said to have acquired additional...