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There are appearances too strong not to excite apprehension that the affairs of this Country are drawing fast to an eventful crisis. Various circumstances dayly unfolding themselves authorise a conclusion that France has adopted a system of conduct towards the neutral maritime nations generally which amount to little less than actual hostility. I mean the total interruption of their Trade with...
The emissaries of France when driven from every other expedient for extenuating her depredations have a last refuge in the example of Great Britain. The Treatment which we receive from France (say they) is not worse than that which was received from Great Britain. If this apology were founded in fact it would still be a miserable subterfuge. For what excuse is it to France, or what consolation...
13Amicus, [11 September 1792] (Hamilton Papers)
For the National Gazette. A writer in the Gazette of Saturday last, after several observations, with regard to certain charges, which have lately been brought forward against the Secretary of State, proceeds to make or insinuate several charges against another public character. As to the observations which are designed to exculpate the Secretary of State, I shall do nothing more than refer to...
For the Gazette of the United States Mr. Fenno It was easy to foresee, when the hint appeared in your Gazette of [25th July] that the Editor of the National Gazette received a salary from the General Government, advantage would be taken of its want of explicitness and particularity to make the circumstance matter of merit in Mr. Freneau and an argument of his independent disinterestedness....
For the Gazette of the United States . The charges which have been brought against “the EDITOR of the NATIONAL GAZETTE,” as he himself states them to be, are no otherwise personal charges, than as they designate the persons , against whom they are made. In their application to Mr. Freneau, they affect him solely in his capacity of Editor of a public paper (which may justly be considered as a...
For the Gazette of the United States Facts, Mr. Fenno, speak louder than words, and, under certain circumstances, louder even than oaths. The Editor of the National Gazette must not think to swear away their efficacy. If he be, truly, as they announce, the pensioned tool of the public character, who has been named, no violation of truth, in any shape, ought to astonish. Equivocations and...
To the Honorable the Legislatures of Virginia, Delaware Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York. The Commissioners from the said states, respectively assembled at Annapolis, humbly beg leave to report. That, pursuant to their several appointments, they met, at Annapolis in the State of Maryland, on the eleventh day of September Instant, and having proceeded to a Communication of their powers;...
18Anti-Defamer, [19 August 1792] (Hamilton Papers)
For the Fœderal Gazette Russel under an affected moderation veils the most insidious and malignant designs & slily propagates the basest slanders. This is evident from the following passage of his second paper. After stating a visionary and impracticable scheme for avoiding a war with the Indians —he proceeds thus—“But then, how many offices had been wanting, how many lucrative contracts would...
Do me the favor to learn from the President, & inform me by the bearer, whether mister Lee’s resignation was purely voluntary on his part, or was occasioned by any circumstance dissatisfactory to the President. The reason to the enquiry is that I may regulate my expressions to him accordingly. I presume no such circumstance has occured; but for greater caution I ask. Yrs &c. LB , DLC:GW . For...
New York, February 27, 1789. A newspaper writer who signed himself “A Spectator” reported that Hamilton stated at a political meeting in New York City: “that as the residence of Congress would doubtless be esteemed a matter of some import to the city of NewYork, and as it would certainly be contended for— Our representative should be a man well qualified in oratory to prove, that this city is...