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[ New York ] October 11, 1776. Account between Alsop Hunt and James Hunt and Hamilton for “Buckskin Breeches Delivered the Soldiers of the New york Artillery” company commanded by Hamilton. The account runs from March 5 to October 11, 1776, and was not settled until 1785. A receipt, verso, reads: “Received Payment of the within Acct. in full thereof and all other Demands, per Alsop Hunt & Jas...
I do hereby certify that the bearer William Douglass has lost his arm in the service of this state, having been a Matross in my company of Artillery, thereto belonging; and he is accordingly recommended to the Convention thereof, as intitled to the provision made by a late resolve of the Continental Congress, for those disabled in defence of American liberty. Pay was drawn for the above Wm....
Trenton, December 5, 1776. The return is headed “Return of the States of part of two Companeys of artilery Commanded by Col Henery Knox & Capt Drury & Capt Lt Moores of Capt Hamiltons Com.” ADS , Papers of George Washington, Library of Congress. H’s company had been assigned at first to General John Scott’s brigade but was soon transferred to the command of Colonel Henry Knox. This return is...
Philadelphia, February 11, 1777. “From the general character of Mr. James Ledly and from my own Observations…, I have all Reason to Believe him Discreet well Behaved man and a good Soldier.…” Copy, Reel 91, Item 78, II, p. 311, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives. Ledlie was master-at-arms of the Repulse , a xebec in the Continental Navy. The statement printed above appears...
[ February 14, 1777. In a letter to Hamilton dated April 31, 1777 April–May, 1777, Knox wrote: “I could not omit acknowledging the receipt of you⟨r⟩ Very Circumstantial and Satisfactory Letter of the 14th. Feby.” Letter not found. ] MS is misdated April 31, 1777.
[ Morristown, New Jersey, March, 1777. On December 10, 1777, Knox, writing to Hamilton, referred to “The fine, impartial, laconic & highly descriptive account you favour’d me with of the last Years Campain, in your letter of March last.” Letter not found. ]
The change in my own circumstances and in those of your company of Artillery lately under my command make it necessary I should inform you of the present state of things, respect⟨ing⟩ it; in order that you may determine as to the future disposal of it; and I should be happy as speedily as convenient to know your pleasure on the subject. His Excellency has been pleased to appoint me one of his...
Your letter of the 7th. instant to his Excellency fell into my hands. He has been very much indisposed for three or four days past, insomuch that his attention to business is pronounced by the Doctor to be very improper; and we have made a point of keeping all from him which was not indispensibly necessary. I detained your express a day in hopes of a convenient opportunity to communicate your...
In a letter Just received from Colonel Ward, there appears to be an objection made against innoculating his regiment, in consequence of some former order, not to innoculate Militia ’till all the Continental troops had undergone the operation. His Excellency desires that this objection, with respect to Colonel Wards regiment, should cease; and that they may immediately be admitted to the...
If General Knox has not passed through on his way here, and gotten out of your reach, you will be pleased carefully and expeditiously to convey the inclosed letter to him; as it is intended to hurry him on to Camp. If he is out of reach, destroy the letter, for it will be of no consequence to return it. The family are all well; and hope soon to see you here, at the head of your bloody...
Since writing the within, The General received your letter, respecting the innoculation of your regiment, and permission for yourself to go home. He has removed the difficulty in the way of innoculating your regiment, but has thought proper to refer the decision of what you request concerning yourself to Generals Stephen & Maxwell; and if they think the situation of affairs, requires your...
With chearfulness, I embrace the proposal of corresponding with your convention, through you; and shall from time to time as far as my leisure will permit, and my duty warrant, communicate such transactactions as shall happen, such pieces of intelligence as shall be received and such comments upon them as shall appear necessary, to convey a true idea of what is going on in the military line....
Two days ago I accepted your challenge and met you for the first time in the epistolary field; since which I had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 19th. instant; and as far as circumstances will permit, close with your proposal of interchanging blows twice a week. The present time is so unfruitful of events that it affords no intelligence worth your notice, as to transactions of a...
His Excellency General Washington has permitted Doctor Thomas Sendown, the bearer hereof, and Mr. Laghlin McIntosh prisoners with us on parole, to go into New York to be exchanged for two other Gentlemen of similar rank, prisoners with you. The Gentlemen he desires should be released instead of them are Doctor Samuel McKensie, taken at Three Rivers, and Mr. Daniel Frink Commissary, who was...
[ Morristown, New Jersey, March 29, 1777. On April 2, 1777, the New York Committee of Correspondence, writing to Hamilton, stated: “We received Your’s of the 29th. Ultimo and are extream⟨ ly ⟩ sorry to hear of your Indisposition.” Letter not found. ]
[ Morristown, New Jersey, April 2, 1777. On April 5, 1777, Hamilton, writing to the New York Committee of Correspondence, stated: “Since my last I have had the pleasure of receiving your reply to my two favours of 29th. Ulto. & 2d. current.” Letter of April 2, 1777, not found. ]
[ Morristown, New Jersey, April 3, 1777. On April 8, 1777, the New York Committee of Correspondence wrote to Hamilton: “Yours of the third came safe⟨ly to hand⟩ this Day.” Letter not found. ]
Since my last I have had the pleasure of receiving your reply to my two favours of 29th. Ulto & 2d. current. I am happy enough to be able to inform you that my indisposition, which was the occasion of my brevity when I last wrote, is now removed. The opinion I advanced respecting the Enemy’s not moving before the beginning of May seems to be Shaken, though not entirely overthrown by some...
Agreeable to your request, I inquired of Gen: Knox, concerning a vacancy of a Captain’s birth in his Corps. I find there is such vacancy; and upon being pressed to mention my reason for the inquiry, contrary to your prohibition, I ventured to inform him, that you had signified to me an intention of taking a more active part in our military affairs, than you had heretofore done—and that, I was...
I take pleasure in transmitting you a letter, committed to my care, by your Sister Miss Suky, and in executing a promise, I gave her, of making an advance towards a correspondence with you. She says you discover, in all your letters to her, a relish for politics, which she thinks my situation qualifies me better for gratifying, than would be in her power; and from a desire to accommodate you...
I this day received your favour of the 8th instant. Hurry of business prevents my entering into a particular detail of affairs, either with respect to the enemy, or ourselves; though matters remain much in the same situation, as when I last wrote. The enemy are unquestionably preparing to take the field as soon as possible; notwithstanding which, I believe it may be full as late, as I at first...
His Excellency requests that you will transmit the enclosed letter to General Wayne, by the first safe opportunity. I am, gentlemen,   Yr. most humble serv. Journals of the Provincial Congress of the State of New-York Journals of the Provincial Congress, Provincial Convention, Committee of Safety and Council of Safety of the State of New-York. 1775–1776–1777 (Albany, 1842). , II, 431. George...
I communicated your Lordship’s letter to his Excellency. He has desired me to send Capt Scott’s company their dismission, which you will therefore be pleased to give them, on the expiration of their time. General Green will bring you an answer to your letter respecting Mr. Willcox’s, by which you will perceive that his Excellency has approved, and that I have written to Mr. Willcox agreeable...
I take occasion to inform you, that an ⟨attempt⟩ was yesterday made to suprize Bound Brook. It partly succeeded but not to the enemy’s wish. They got possession of Bound Brook, but our people eluded their design of surrounding and cutting off the whole party, and made good their retreat to the pass of the mountains in the rear. We lost however 3 field pieces, one iron 6 pounder, and 2 brass...
The disposition of the Convention, with respect to the disaffected among you is highly commendable, and justified by every principle of equity and policy. The necessity of exemplary punishment, throughout the States, is become evident beyond a doubt; and it were to be wished every one of the thirteen would imitate the judicious conduct of New-York. Lenity and forbearance have been tried too...
It may not be amiss to hint that some sentences have been passed in persuance of this resolve, which have been improper. Confiscations of the real and personal estates of offenders have been in some instances ordained, and in others, whipping. It would be best where the nature of the case would justify it, to punish capitally; or where the crimes are not of sufficient enormity, to authorise...
A number of disaffected persons having been taken up and brought to His Excellency, he ordered an examination into their cases to know who of them were subject to a military jurisdiction, & who came properly under the cognizance of the civil power; also to discriminate those who were innocent, or guilty of trivial offences from those whose crimes were of a more capital and heinous nature;...
His Excellency desires me to inform you, that the Congress have been pleased, to appoint Monsieur Le Baron D.’Arondhl, colonel of the regiment, to which you belong. He conceives both the honor and advantage of the regiment, to be promoted by the appointment of a Gentleman to the command of it, so respectable by birth, the honorable Station he fill’d in the service of his Prussian Majesty, and...
It is his Excellency’s desire, that you have an immediate inspection made into the state of the mens arms and accoutrements, belonging to your division; and take effectual measures to have them put into the best order possible. Also to have your men completed to their proper complement of ammunition, strictly injoining the greatest care to avoid all wanton and unnecessary waste. I am Sir  ...
Extreme hurry of business puts it out of my power to say but very little. Your information concerning a piece of ordnance lately constructed at Philadelphia is true. There is such a piece at Head Quarters, weighs 227 ld, carries a three pound ball. The iron is wraught hooped and welded together. The General and others esteem it a great acquisi[ti]on. It has been fired twenty times as fast as...
It appears by your letter to his Excellency that the detachment of Marylanders under Col Spotswood, have marched to your post, with the other troops. His intention and directions were, that they should remain at Princeton, as he wishes to keep the Corps united, but since the matter has fallen out differently, he desires that detachment may immediately return to Princeton. ALS , sold at...
The inclosed was intended to be sent with the prisoners mentioned in the list; but before this could be done, Mr. Sims, one of the chief Justices of the State came to this town, and informed me, that the Governor and Council were upon the point of adjourning, and that the sending the prisoners to them would only be an embarrassment without answering, at present, any valuable purpose. He...
When I was almost out of patience and out of humour at your presumptuous delay, in not showing yourself duly sensible of the honor done you, by me, your epistle opportunely came to hand, and has put all matters tolerably to rights. As I thought it well enough written, and no discredit to you, I ventured to show it to a Gentleman of our family. He was silly enough to imagine, that I did this...
[ Morristown, New Jersey May, 1777. “Mr. Carter who I am told is a friend of the cause has been here to complain that some persons under the Commersary’s orders, insist on taking from him two labouring oxen, which he cannot possibly spare from the business of his farm. As Agriculture is as necessary to go on as anything else, as The General wishes not unreasonably to distress the inhabitants...
The bearer of this is Mr. Malmedi a french Gentleman of learning, abilities and experience. I believe he thinks himself intitled to preferment and comes to Congress for that purpose. At the recommendation of General Lee he was made Brigadier General by the State of Rhode Island, and filled the station to the satisfaction of his employers, as appears by a letter from Governor Cook, speaking of...
I thank you for the favor of the pamphlet, containing your form of government, which, without flattery, I consider as far more judicious and digested than any thing of the kind, that has yet appeared among us; though I am not so unreserved in my approbation as to think it free from defects. While I view it, in the main, as a wise and excellent system, I freely confess it appears to me to have...
I have received the pleasure of your favour of yesterday’s date. The reasons you assign for the interval of silence on your part are admitted as sufficient; though I regret that the principal one exists—the combination of the tories for a general insurrection. But perhaps on the scale of policy I ought rather to congratulate you on the event: That there are too many tories in your state as...
I this moment received the favour of your letter of the 16th instant. I partly agree and partly disagree with you respecting the deficiencies of your constitution. That there is a want of vigor in the executive, I believe will be found true. To determine the qualifications proper for the chief executive Magistrate requires the deliberate wisdom of a select assembly, and cannot be safely lodged...
[ Middlebrook, New Jersey, May 30, 1777. By Washington’s orders Hamilton wrote to Grice, assistant deputy quartermaster general, ordering the removal of all boats in the Delaware from Trenton up to Coryells. Letter not found. ] GW John C. Fitzpatrick, ed., The Writings of George Washington (Washington, 1931–1944). , VII VIII , 144, note 29. Coryell’s Ferry, located on the New Jersey side of...
By His Excellency’s command, I am to acknowledge the receipt of yours per Mr. Grace. Colo. Biddle has given Mr. Grace an order to make use of the waggons at Hackets Town, for the purpose of transporting the twelve boats you mention. The General expects it will be done with all possible dispatch, as it is absolutely necessary we should have all the boats we can collect at and about Coryel’s...
I received your favour per express, and as the absence of my former respectable correspondents has made a change necessary, I am happy that you have been substituted in their room. Except a body of Militia at and about Pumpton and a few detachments of observation, our whole army is now collected at two points; the main body here, and a division under General Sullivan at Princeton. Though this...
By order of His Excellency, I am to acknowlege receipt of your favour of yesterday. The General is astonished at that extraordinary want of cloathing you mention; as Mr. Mease informed Mr. Tilghman that a full proportion of this article had been retained in Massachusetts for all its troops. It is unaccountable, that they should be ⟨so⟩ unprovided, unless the cloaths destined for them should...
His Excellency has received your favour of this Day. In answer to it he commands me to inform you that though he is exceedingly happy to hear such an animation prevails among the inhabitants, yet he can by no means, consent to put arms in their hands. This article is too much wanted for the Continental army to be spared to the militia; and experience has taught us, that there has been infinite...
His Excellency has examined your Provision report; and finds every part of it very well, except that relating to the placing a quantity at Trenton. This is the most improper place in the world; for if the enemy should move towards Philadelphia the provisions at trentown in the hurry occasioned by such an event would inevitably fall into their hands. You will therefore without loss of time have...
As the enemy appear from different Quarters to be in motion it is necessary that the army be in readiness to march, it is therefore ordered that the tents be immediately struck—the baggage and camp equipage loaded—the horses to the Waggons and all the men at their respective incampments paraded and ready to march at a moments warning. ALS , University of California at Berkeley. Lincoln, who...
His Excellency desires you will not open or distribute the Cloathing stopped at your post, ’till a Deputy Cloathier comes up to take Charge of it, who will be with you without Loss of time. I am Sir   Your most humb servt. Df , or contemporary copy, in writing of Caleb Gibbs, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
By His Excellencys Command, I am to desire you will give orders upon the deputy Clothier General at Peeks-Kill, for the necessary supply of Cloathing &c. for the four companies raising under your direction. It is not however intended, that more shall be drawn than a sufficiency for the number of men actually inlisted. I am Sir   Your most Obedt servant ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library...
His Excellency has received your two last favours to day. In the first you hint the want of a reinforcement; but as the intention of your body is chiefly for observation and skirmishing and not to make any serious stand, it is the less necessary it should be powerful in numbers. It will however depend upon circumstances, how far it will be expedient to reinforce you; and as soon as any thing...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] June 13, 1777. “… Joshua Austin, belonging to the independent company of the State of Connecticut, … appears to be incapable of military service. He is hereby discharged from the Continental army.…” ADS , Connecticut State Library, Hartford.
The whole army immediately to strike their tents, pack them up, and get themselves in every respect ready for an instant march. The Quarter Master General to have every thing in his department ready. Colonel Biddle will communicate the above order, to the Commissary & Pay Master General & Judge advocate. ALS , MS Division, New York Public Library. Although George Washington anticipated a...