Alexander Hamilton Papers
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Constitutional Convention. Remarks on the Number of Votes Required in Congress to Override a Presidential Veto, [12 September 1787]

Constitutional Convention. Remarks on the
Number of Votes Required in Congress to
Override a Presidential Veto

[Philadelphia, September 12, 1787]

Mr. Hamilton added his testimony to the fact that 2/3 in N. York had been ineffectual either where a popular object, or a legislative faction operated; of which he mentioned some instances.1

Hunt and Scott, Debates description begins Gaillard Hunt and James Brown Scott, eds., The Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 Which Framed the Constitution of the United States of America. Reported by James Madison (New York, 1920). description ends , 555.

1A committee of style had furnished the members of the Convention a digest of the plan they had prepared. Hugh Williamson then “moved to reconsider the clause requiring three fourths of each House to overrule the negative of the President, in order to strike out 3/4 and insert 2/3.” Gouverneur Morris, in opposing Williamson’s motion, mentioned, among examples, that “the example of N. York shews that 2/3 is not sufficient to answer the purpose” (Hunt and Scott, Debates description begins Gaillard Hunt and James Brown Scott, eds., The Debates in the Federal Convention of 1787 Which Framed the Constitution of the United States of America. Reported by James Madison (New York, 1920). description ends , 554–55). H’s remarks followed those by Gouverneur Morris.

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