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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Washington, George
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    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
As I flatter myself I may indulge a consciousness that my services have been of some value to the public, at least enough to merit the small compensation I wish, I will make no apology to your Excellency for conveying through you that wish to Congress. You are able to inform them if they wish information, in what degree I may have been useful— and I have entire confidence that you will do me...
In my passage through the Jerseys and since my arrival here I have taken particular pains to discover the public sentiment and I am more and more convinced that this is the critical opportunity for establishing the prosperity of this country on a solid foundation—I have conversed with men of information not only of this City but from different parts of the state; and they agree that there has...
Major Fairly is just setting out on a visit to You I believe on some business relating to the Cincinnati—The society of this state met some short time since and took into consideration the proposed alterations in the original frame of the Institution— Some were strenuous for adhering to the old constitution a few for adopting the new and many for a middle line—This disagreement of opinion and...
Your Excellency’s friendly and obliging letter of the 28th Ulto came safely to hand. I thank you for your assurance of seconding my application to General Morgan. The truth of that affair is, that he purchased the watch for a trifle of a British soldier, who plundered Major Cochran at the moment of his fall at York Town. I should be deeply pained my Dear Sir if your scruples in regard to a...
Capt. Cochran of the British navy has requested my aid in recovering a family watch worn by his brother, who fell at York Town, (and now in the possession of —— ——). In compliance with this request I have written the letter herewith to —— —— which I take the liberty to convey through you, in hope that if you see no impropriety in it, you would add your influence to the endeavour to gratify...
Your last two letters have duly come to hand & the Count De Moustier has delivered me the watch you committed to his charge. Your obliging attention to this matter claims my particular acknowledgements. I will make no apology for asking you to take the additional trouble of forwarding the inclosed to the General—I take the liberty of passing it through you that you may by perusing the contents...
I think I may address the subject of this letter to Your Excellency with more propriety than to any other person, as it is purely of a military nature, as you are best acquainted with my services as an officer, and as you are now engaged in assisting to form the arrangements for the future peace establishment. Your Excellency knows that in March 82, I relinquished all claim to any future...
Your Excellency’s friendly and obliging letter of the 28th Ulto. came safely to hand. I thank you for your assurance of seconding my application to General Morgan. The truth of that affair is, that he purchased the watch for a trifle of a British soldier, who plundered Major Cochran at the moment of his fall at York Town. I should be deeply pained my Dear Sir if your scruples in regard to a...
I am much obliged to Your Excellency for the explicit manner in which you contradict the insinuations mentioned in my last letter—The only use I shall make of your answer will be to put it into the hands of a few friends. The constitution proposed has in this state warm friends and warm enemies. The first impressions every where are in its favour; but the artillery of its opponents makes some...