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    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Jefferson, Thomas"
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I have the honor to inform you that the Collectors have been furnished with all the Sea letters that have been received from Your Department, And that a demand exists at several of the Custom Houses for more. With great respect, I have the honor to be, Sir, your Obedt Servt. RC ( NNP ); in a clerk’s hand, signed by Hamilton; at foot of text: “The Secretary of State”; endorsed by TJ as received...
The Comptroller of the Treasury has reported to me that “On examining the subsisting contracts between the United States and the Government of France and the Farmers General and a comparison thereof with the foreign accounts and documents transmitted to the Treasury the following facts appear. That, previous to the Treaty of February 1778, the sum of Three millions of livres had been advanced...
The Comptroller of the Treasury has reported to me that “On examining the subsisting contracts between the United States and the Government of France and the Farmers General and a comparison thereof with the foreign accounts and documents transmitted to the Treasury the following facts appear. That, previous to the Treaty of February 1778, the sum of Three Millions of livres had been advanced...
It was not till within an hour, that I received your letter of the 1st with the papers accompanying it. I approve all the drafts of letters, as they stand, except that I have some doubt about the concluding sentence of that on the subject of Henfield . If the facts are (as I presume they are) established—may it not be construed into a wish, that there may be found no law to punish a conduct in...
It was not till within an hour, that I received your letter of the 1st with the papers accompanying it. I approve all the Drafts of letters, as they stand, except that I have some doubt about the concluding sentence of that on the subject of Henfield. If the facts are (as I presume they are) established—may it not be construed into a wish, that there may be found no law to punish a conduct in...
I have the honor of your note, transmitting the copy of one from mr. Genet of yesterday. As our laws stand no transfer of any part of her cargo from one vessel to another within our Ports, can take place ’till after a regular entry and the paying or securing the payment of the duties. You are sensible, Sir, that I have no discretion to dispense with their requisitions. If the wines are to be...
I have the honor of your note , transmitting the copy of one from Mr. Genet of yesterday. As our laws stand, no transfer of any part of her cargo from one vessel to another within our Ports, can take place ’till after a regular entry and the paying or securing the payment of the duties. You are sensible, Sir, that I have no discretion to dispense with their requisitions. If the wines are be...
A Perhaps the Secretary of State, revising the expression of this member of the sentence, will find terms to express his idea still more clearly and may avoid the use of a word of doubtful propriety “Contraventions.” B “but be attentive” C “mere” to be omitted D Considering that this Letter will probably become a matter of publicity to the world is it necessary to be so strong? Would not the...
A Perhaps the Secretary of State, revising the expression of this member of the sentence, will find terms to express his idea still more clearly and may avoid the use of a word of doubtful propriety “Contraventions” B “but be attentive” C “mere” to be omitted D Considering that this Letter will probably become a matter of publicity to the world is it necessary to be so strong? Would not the...
A   Perhaps the Secretary of State, revising the expression of this member of the sentence, will find terms to express his idea still more clearly and may avoid the use of a word of doubtful propriety “Contraventions” B   “but be attentive” C   “mere” to be omitted D   Considering that this Letter will probably become a matter of publicity to the world is it necessary to be so strong? Would...