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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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[ Philadelphia, February 24, 1783. The description of this letter reads: “Referring to a plan for carrying the 8th article of the confederation into execution, etc.” Letter not found. ] Luther S. Livingston, ed., American Book-Prices Current (New York, 1906), 717. See the first and second “Continental Congress. Motion on Evaluation of State Lands for Carrying into Effect Article 8 of the...
The bearer Abby Mot is a soldiers widow in great distress who wants to go to her friends in the Jerseys but has not the means. If you could find her a place in some public waggon going that way, you would do an act of charity. I am Sir Yr. Obed ser. ALS , Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, Buffalo, New York. Hodgdon was commissary general of military stores. In 1789 H paid Abby Mott’s...
[ Philadelphia, February 22, 1783. On the last page of a memorial of Philip Thompson to the Supreme Executive Council of Pennsylvania Hamilton and Major General Alexander McDougall made endorsements. The paragraph by Hamilton reads: “I certify that the Memorialist was an active and zealous whig in the early periods of the contest and I have reason to believe the above representation is true....
Mr. Hamilton enlarged on the general utility of permanent funds to the fœderal interests of this Country, & pointed out the difference between the nature of the Constitution of the British Executive, & that of the U.S. in answer to Mr. Lee’s reasoning from the case of Ship money. “Notes of Debates in the Continental Congress,” MS, James Madison Papers, Library of Congress. Congress on February...
The Committee to whom were referred the letter from The Commander in Chief with its inclosures submit the following resolution Resolved that The Commander in Chief be informed that Congress always happy to receive his sentiments either on the political or military affairs of these states the utility of which they have upon so many occasions experienced have paid all the attention to his letter...
The conversation turned on the subject of revenue under the consideration of Congress, and on the situation of the army. The conversation on the first subject ended in a general concurrence (Mr. Hamilton excepted) in the impossibility of adding to the impost on trade any taxes that wd. operate equally throughout the States, or be adopted by them. On the second subject Mr. Hamilton & Mr. Peters...
A motion was made by Mr. Hamilton seconded by Mr. Bland to postpone the clause of the report made by the Come. of the whole, for altering the Impost, viz. the clause limiting its duration to 25 years, in order to substitute a proposition declaring it to be inexpedient to limit the period of its duration; first because it ought to be commensurate to the duration of the debt, 2dly. because it...
Mr. Hamilton opposed the motion strenuously, declared that as a friend to the army as well as to the other Creditors & to the public at large he could never assent to such a partial dispensation of Justice; that the different States being differently attached to different branches of the public debt would never concur in establishg. a fund wch. was not extended to every branch; that it was...
Whereas it is the desire of Congress that the motives of their deliberations and measures (as far as they can be disclosed consistently with the public safety) should be fully known to their constituents: Therefore Resolved that when the establishment of funds for paying the principal & interest of the public debts shall be under the consideration of this house the doors thereof shall be open....
Whereas it is in the opinion of Congress essential to those principles of justice & liberality which ought to govern the intercourse between these states that equitable abatements shall be made in favour of such states, parts of which have been for different periods in the course of the war in possession of the enemy, in the application of the rule prescribed by the confederation and on which...
In a letter which I wrote lately to General Schuyler, I informed him of the import of the answer from Vermont, and what had been done with it in Congress. The Committee to whom it was referred have not yet reported; but I have little expectation of decision. Congress have been for some time employed on matters of the 1st. importance, devising a plan for carrying the 8th. Article of the...
Flattering myself that your knowlege of me will induce you to receive the observations I mak⟨e⟩ as dictated by a regard to the public good, I take the liber⟨ty⟩ to suggest to you my ideas on some matters of delicacy and importance. I view the present juncture as a very interesting one. I need not observe how far the temper and situation of the army make it so. The stat⟨e⟩ of our finances was...
Flattering myself that your knowlege of me will induce you to receive the observations I make as dictated by a regard to the public good, I take the liberty to suggest to you my ideas on some matters of delicacy and importance. I view the present juncture as a very interesting one—I need not observe how far the temper and situation of the army make it so—The state of our finances was perhaps...
That it is the Opinion of Congress that complete justice cannot be done to the Creditors of the United States nor the restoration of public Credit be effected; nor the future exigencies of the war provided for, but by the establishment of [permanent & adequate funds to operate generally throughout the united States, to be collected by Congress]. AD , Papers of the Continental Congress,...
Resolved , That in order to enable Congress to form an eventual plan towards carrying into execution the 8th. article of confederation the several States be required to pass laws for forming or dividing their respective states into such districts as they judge most convenient for procuring an accurate valuation of the lands and of the buildings and improvements thereon, & to appoint...
Whereas the carrying into execution the 8th article of the confederation relative to a valuation of land for ascertaining the quotas of each state towards the general expence in a manner consistent with justice to all the members of the Union and with such accuracy as the importance of the subject demands will necessarily be attended with very considerable expence to which the present state of...
The Committee to whom was referred the Memorial from Mr. De Cazeau report: That it appears by Mr. Cazeaus representation that he was possessed of large property in Canada; that he took an early and decided part in favour of the American revolution; rendered services to our army in that Country by supplies of provisions & otherwise which were productive of immediate loss to him and attempted to...
[ Philadelphia, December, 1782–January, 1783. “In a late report which had been drawn up by Mr. Hamilton & made to Congress, in answr. to a Memorial from the Legislatre. of Pa.… among other things shewing the impossibility Congress had been under of payg. their Credrs. it was observed that the aid afforded by the Ct. of France had been appropriated by that Court at the time to the immediate use...
Mr. Hamilton disliked every plan that made but partial provision for the public debts; as an inconsistent & dishonorable departure from the declaration made by Congs. on that subject. He said the domestic Creditors would take the alarm at any distinctions unfavorable to their claims; that they would withhold their influence from any such measures recommended by Congress; and that it must be...
Mr. Hamilton, in reply to Mr. Elseworth dwelt long on the inefficacy of State funds. He supposed too that greater obstacles would arise to the execution of the plan than to that of a general revenue. As an additional reason for the latter to be collected by officers under the appointment of Congress, he signified that as the energy of the fœderal Govt. was evidently short of the degree...
Mr. Hamilton went extensively into the subject; the sum of it was as follows: he observed that funds considered as permanent sources of revenue were of two kinds: 1st. Such as wd. extend generally & uniformly throughout the U.S., & wd. be collected under the authority of Congs. 2dly., such as might be established separately within each State, & might consist of any objects which were chosen by...
The Grand Committee having considered the contents of the Memorial presented by the army find that they comprehend five different articles. 1st. Present pay 2dly. A settlement of accounts of the arrearages of pay and security for what is due. 3dly. A commutation of the half pay allowed by different resolutions of Congress for an equivalent in gross. 4thly. A settlement of the accounts of...
The Committee to whom was referred the motion of Mr. Arnold and those subsequent thereupon report that in their opinion it would be improper for Congress to concur in the object of that motion, as with respect to a part of the extracts specified relating merely to the general growing political importance of these states, the injunction of secrecy being taken off, any member who inclines to...
I am honored with your excellency’s letter of the 29th. Decr. I have received an order from Col. Hay on Mr. Sands, which I have no doubt will shortly be paid. I have felt no inconvenience from not having the money sooner. Since my last to you, we have received no further accounts from Europe, so that we remain in the same uncertainty with respect to the negotiations for peace. Wether it will...
The Committee to whom was referred the letter from the Qr. Mr. General of the 4th. of December last have conferred with him find that there are several omissions in the plan adopted by Congress the 23d. of October last for regulating the Qr. Mrs. department and are of opinion that some of the salaries of particular officers therein are reduced too low. They therefore recommend that the...
⟨The post my⟩ angel has met with some interruption (I suppose by the river being impassable) which deprives me of the pleasure of hearing from you. I am inexpressibly anxious to learn you have began your journey. I write this for fear of the worst, but I should be miserable if I thought it would find you at Albany. If by any misapprehension you should still be there I entreat you lose not a...
On the report for valuing the land conformably to the rule laid down in the fœderal articles, the delegates from Connecticut contended for postponing the subject during the war, alledging the impediments arising from the possession of N. Y., &c. by the enemy; but apprehending (as was supposed) that the flourishing state of Connecticut compared with the Southern States, would render a valuation...
The Committee to whom was recommitted the letter of the 22d. of December from the Secretary at War submit the following resolution: Resolved that Cols John Greaton and Rufus Putnam of the Massachusettes line [and] Col Elias Dayton of the Jersey line be promoted to the rank of Brigadier Generals, agreeably to the resolution of Congress of the 12 Decr 1782. AD , Papers of the Continental...
As the Legislature will shortly meet I take the liberty to mention to Your Excellency, that it appears to me of Great importance, they should take up the affair of Vermont on the idea of a compromise with Massachusetts and New Hampshire and propose to those States a meeting of Commissioners for that purpose. I have little hope that we shall ever be able to engage Congress to act with decision...
That the President make the acknowlegements of Congress in a particular manner to His Excellency The Count De Rochambeau and signify to him the high sense they entertain of the distinguished talents displayed by him with so much advantage to these states in the most important conjunctures as well as of the strict and exemplary discipline which have been uniformly conspicuous in the troops...