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    • Hamilton, Alexander
    • Hamilton, Alexander
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    • Clinton, George
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Documents filtered by: Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Author="Hamilton, Alexander" AND Recipient="Clinton, George" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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By His Excellencys Command, I am to desire you will give orders upon the deputy Clothier General at Peeks-Kill, for the necessary supply of Cloathing &c. for the four companies raising under your direction. It is not however intended, that more shall be drawn than a sufficiency for the number of men actually inlisted. I am Sir   Your most Obedt servant ADfS , George Washington Papers, Library...
During my stay in this place, I have received intimations that certain officers high in command in this quarter have been guilty of practices, equally unjust, disgraceful to the Army, and injurious to the common cause; I mean seizing the property of the inhabitants of this State, and converting it to their own use, without any compensation either to the right owners, or to the State. A...
I did myself the honor of writing to you, immediately after my arrival at Head Quarters, in answer to two letters I found here, from you. There is a matter, which often obtrudes itself upon my mind, and which requires the attention of every person of sense and influence, among us. I mean a degeneracy of representation in the great council of America. It is a melancholy truth Sir, and the...
Capt. Coleman delivered me your two letters of the 5th & 6th, instant. The pleasure, I have, in corresponding with you, will dispose me, whenever I have any thing to communicate, that may be worth your attention, or that appears to me so, to trouble you with my sentiments: But I shall not expect you to make an equal return either in quantity or frequency. You will, in this, intirely consult...
The bearer of this is an old woman and of course the most troublesome animal in the world. She wants to go into New York. It was in vain we told her no inhabitant could be permitted by us to go within the enemy’s lines without permission from the civil power. Old and decrepid as she is, she made the tour of the family and tried her blandishments upon each. I assured her Governor Clinton could...
For some time past I have had a bill on France lying in Philadelphia the sale of which has been delayed on account of the excessive lowness of the exchange. I am told it has lately risen something, and I expect by Col Hay’s return to receive a sufficient sum to pay the value of the woman Mrs. H had of Mrs. Clinton. I hope the delay may be attended with no inconvenience to you. I wrote you some...
I have the honor to inclose Your Excellency the copy of a warrant from The Honorable Robert Morris Esqr. Superintendant of the Finances of the United States; by which you will perceive that agreeable to the resolution of Congress of the 2d. of November last, he has appointed me Receiver of the Continental Taxes for this state. I am therefore to request that the Legislature will be pleased to...
I have lately received a letter from the Superintendant of Finance inclosing a copy of a circular letter from him to the several states dated 25th of July 81 in which he requests information upon the following important points: “What supplies of every kind money provisions forage transportation &c. have been furnished by this State to the United States since the 18th. of March 1780.” “The...
By advices from Philadelphia I find that the present is a period rather critical on the subject of money and concenters a variety of demands which it is not easy to satisfy. It becomes therefore of importance to the Financier to avail himself of every immediate resource. This induces me to request you will be so good as [to] inform me, whether there is any near prospect of obtaining the loan...
Inclosed we have the honor to transmit Your Excellency sundry resolutions of Congress of the 5th instant; by which you will judge of the present temper of that body, respecting the affairs of the grants. We cannot, however, absolutely rely upon the execution of the coercive part of them if the matter should require an exertion of force. Many who at a distance adopt very decisive ideas, might...