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I certify that William Constable hath delivered me for the Baron De Steuben by way of loan One Hundred pounds December 12th 1788. ADS , anonymous donor. Constable, a native of Ireland, was a prominent New York City merchant. In 1784 he became a partner with John Rucker of New York in the firm of Constable, Rucker, and Company. Rucker died in 1788, and Constable continued the firm under the...
I certify that Joseph Strong has served a clerkship of three years in my office in the business of an Attorney and that he is of good moral character. ADS , Pleadings, 1754–1837, S-486, Hall of Records, New York City. Following his clerkship, Strong practiced law first in Cooperstown, New York, and then in Albany. See Strong to H, August 11, 1796 ( PAH Harold C. Syrett, ed., The Papers of...
[ New York, February 13, 1789. The dealer’s catalogue description of this document reads: “certifying the character of Peter Ogilvie.” Document not found. ] ADS , sold at Swann Auction Galleries, October 1, 1942, Lot 28. Ogilvie was a New York attorney, a member of the New York Assembly from Orange County in 1778 and 1779, and judge of the Court of Probates of New York State from 1787 to 1799.
I understand you are to have a meeting at this place to morrow on the subject of the ensuing elections and accordingly inclose you to be laid before the meeting an address to the Inhabitants of your Township in regard to the appointment of a Governor. It is much to be wished the meeting may agree with their fellow citizens in New York and come to a resolution on the subject—For in Politics as...
New York, April 25, 1789. Conveys to Anthon in return for eight hundred pounds “All that certain messuage or dwelling house and lot of Ground situate lying and being in the dock Ward of the City of New York on the Easterly side of a Certain Street there called and known by the name of Broad Street.…” DS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; certified copy, recorded under the date of August...
I am requested by Mr Oudinarde to transmit you the Inclosed Account —I observed to him that it was a little extraordinary the account had not been presented before; and that it was probable your accounts with the public had been long since closed, and that, by the delay, you may have lost the oppurtunity of making it a public charge, as it ought to have been. But as the person was very...
Major Fairly is just setting out on a visit to You I believe on some business relating to the Cincinnati—The society of this state met some short time since and took into consideration the proposed alterations in the original frame of the Institution— Some were strenuous for adhering to the old constitution a few for adopting the new and many for a middle line—This disagreement of opinion and...
In my passage through the Jerseys and since my arrival here I have taken particular pains to discover the public sentiment and I am more and more convinced that this is the critical opportunity for establishing the prosperity of this country on a solid foundation—I have conversed with men of information not only of this City but from different parts of the state; and they agree that there has...
You probably saw some time since some animadversions on certain expressions of Governor Clinton respecting the Convention—You may have seen a piece signed a Republican, attempting to bring the fact into question and endeavouring to controvert the conclusions drawn from it, if true—My answer you will find in the inclosed. I trouble you with it merely from that anxiety which is natural to every...
I am much obliged to Your Excellency for the explicit manner in which you contradict the insinuations mentioned in my last letter—The only use I shall make of your answer will be to put it into the hands of a few friends. The constitution proposed has in this state warm friends and warm enemies. The first impressions every where are in its favour; but the artillery of its opponents makes some...
Capt. Cochran of the British navy has requested my aid in recovering a family watch worn by his brother, who fell at York Town, (and now in the possession of —— ——). In compliance with this request I have written the letter herewith to —— —— which I take the liberty to convey through you, in hope that if you see no impropriety in it, you would add your influence to the endeavour to gratify...
Your Excellency’s friendly and obliging letter of the 28th Ulto came safely to hand. I thank you for your assurance of seconding my application to General Morgan. The truth of that affair is, that he purchased the watch for a trifle of a British soldier, who plundered Major Cochran at the moment of his fall at York Town. I should be deeply pained my Dear Sir if your scruples in regard to a...
Your last two letters have duly come to hand & the Count De Moustier has delivered me the watch you committed to his charge. Your obliging attention to this matter claims my particular acknowledgements. I will make no apology for asking you to take the additional trouble of forwarding the inclosed to the General—I take the liberty of passing it through you that you may by perusing the contents...
Mr Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , CtY .
As I flatter myself I may indulge a consciousness that my services have been of some value to the public, at least enough to merit the small compensation I wish, I will make no apology to your Excellency for conveying through you that wish to Congress. You are able to inform them if they wish information, in what degree I may have been useful— and I have entire confidence that you will do me...
I take the liberty to introduce him to you, as to one who will be disposed, as far as your situation will permit and the circumstances of the State may render practicable, to patronise any just or equitable claims which he may have upon the State. What those claims are he will himself explain to you, I have assured him that he will find in you a friend to justice and an able advocate for...
14 September 1786, Annapolis. Drafted by Alexander Hamilton, with JM the chief witness as to authorship ( JM to Noah Webster, 12 Oct. 1804 , Madison, Writings [Hunt ed.] Gaillard Hunt, ed., The Writings of James Madison (9 vols.; New York, 1900–1910). , VII, 165). The full address is in Syrett and Cooke, Papers of Hamilton Harold C. Syrett and Jacob E. Cooke, eds., The Papers of Alexander...
Among the confederacies of antiquity, the most considerable was that of the Grecian republics associated under the Amphyctionic council. From the best accounts transmitted of this celebrated institution, it bore a very instructive analogy to the present confederation of the American states. The members retained the character of independent and sovereign states, and had equal votes in the...
The examples of antient confederacies, cited in my last paper, have not exhausted the source of experimental instruction on this subject. There are existing institutions, founded on a similar principle, which merit particular consideration. The first which presents itself is the Germanic body. In the early ages of Christianity Germany was occupied by seven distinct nations, who had no common...
The United Netherlands are a confederacy of republics, or rather of aristocracies, of a very remarkable texture; yet confirming all the lessons derived from those which we have already reviewed. The union is composed of seven co-equal and sovereign states, and each state or province is a composition of equal and independent cities. In all important cases not only the provinces, but the cities...
I have been very delinquent My Dear Sir in not thanking you sooner for your letter from Philadelphia. The remarks you make on a certain subject are important and will be attended to. There is truly much embarrassment in the case. I think however the principles we have talked of, in respect to the legislative authorities, are not only just but will apply to the other departments. Nor will the...
I believe I am in your debt a letter or two, which is owing to my occapations [ sic ] in relation to the elections &c. These are now over in this state, but the result is not known. All depends upon Albany where both sides claim the victory. Our doubts will not be removed till the latter end of the month. I hope your expectations of Virginia have not diminished. Respecting the first volume of...
Some days since I wrote to you, My Dear Sir, inclosing a letter from a Mr. V Der Kemp &c. I then mentioned to you that the question of a majority for or against the constitution would depend upon the County of Albany. By the latter accounts from that quarter I fear much that the issue there has been against us. As Clinton is truly the leader of his party, and is inflexibly obstinate I count...
In my last I think I informed you that the elections had turned out, beyond expectation, favourable to the Antifœderal party. They have a majority of two thirds in the Convention and according to the best estimate I can form of about four sevenths in the community. The views of the leaders in this City are pretty well ascertained to be turned towards a long adjournment say till next spring or...
Yesterday, My Dear Sir, The Convention made a house. That day and this have been spent in preliminary arrangements. Tomorrow we go into a Committee of the whole on the Constitution. There is every appearance that a full discussion will take place, which will keep us together at least a fortnight. It is not easy to conjecture what will be the result. Our adversaries greatly outnumber us. The...
I thank you for your letter of the 9h. instant and am glad to learn that you think the chance is in your favour. I hope no disagreeable change may happen. Yet I own I fear something from your indisposition. Our debate here began on the clause respecting the proportion of representation &c. which has taken up two days. Tomorrow I imagine we shall talk about the power over elections. The only...
I am very sorry to find by your letter of the 13th that your prospects are so critical. Our chance of success here is infinitely slender, and none at all if you go wrong. The leaders of the Antifederalists finding their partisans somewhat squeamish about rejection, are obliged at present to recur to the project of conditional amendments. We are going on very deliberately in the discussion and...
A day or two ago General Schuyler at my request sent forward to you an express with an account of the adoption of the Constitution by New Hampshire. We eagerly wait for further intelligence from you, as our only chance of success depends on you. There are some slight symptoms of relaxation in some of the leaders; which authorises a gleam of hope, if you do well: but certainly I think not...
Your letter of the 20h. came to hand two days since. I regret that your prospects were not yet reduced to greater certainty. There is more and more reason to believe that our conduct will be influenced by yours. Our discussions have not yet travelled beyond the power of taxation. To day we shall probably quit this ground to pass to another. Our arguments confound, but do not convince. Some of...
I felicitate you sincerely on the event in Virginia; but my satisfaction will be allayed, if I discover too much facility in the business of amendment-making. I fear the system will be wounded in some of its vital parts by too general a concurrence in some very injudicious recommendations. I allude more particularly to the power of taxation. The more I consider requisition in any shape the...
I thank you My Dear Sir for yours by the post. Yesterday I communicated to Duer our situation which I presume he will have communicated to you. It remains exactly the same, no further question having been taken. I fear the footing mentioned in my letter to Duer is the best upon which it can be placed; but every thing possible will yet be attempted to bring the party from that stand to an...
I wrote to you by the last post since which nothing material has turned up here. We are debating on amendments without having decided what is to be done with them. There is so great a diversity in the views of our opponents that it is impossible to predict any thing. Upon the whole however our fears diminish. Yrs Affecty I take the liberty for certain reasons to put the inclosed under cover to...
I thank you My Dear Sir for yours of the 20th. The only part of it which surprises me is what you mention respecting Clinton. I cannot however believe that the plan will succeed. Nor indeed do I think that Clinton would be disposed to exchange his present appointment for that office or to risk his popularity by holding both. At the same time the attempt merits attention and ought not to be...