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[ 1789–1795 .] Encloses the decision of the Federal District Court of Connecticut on the petition of Captain Timothy Savage. Suspects Savage of intent to defraud. LS , Yale University Library. The MS is a fragment without date or place.
Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Mr Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , CtY .
For the New-York Daily Gazette. To the Electors of the City and County of New York. Fellow Citizens, This day commences the important Election of a Governor, for the next three years. We think it our duty to inform you, that from the account we have received from different quarters, we have the strongest grounds to believe, that a change is in your power , and that proper exertions on your...
New York, April 25, 1789. Conveys to Anthon in return for eight hundred pounds “All that certain messuage or dwelling house and lot of Ground situate lying and being in the dock Ward of the City of New York on the Easterly side of a Certain Street there called and known by the name of Broad Street.…” DS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress; certified copy, recorded under the date of August...
H___ G___. having been informed that Mr. Willet has received a letter from the Attorney General, stating the circumstances of the interview between them, takes occasion to express his expectation that Mr. Willett will communicate it to the public. The [New York] Daily Advertiser , April 15, 1789. For information on the controversy between “H.G.” and Willett, see “H.G. Letters. Introductory...
State of N.Y. to Alexander Hamilton for services as Member of Congress from 21 Feby–5 May 73 days “ 26 May–14 June 19 “ 30 July–18 Oct 79 171 “ deduct from attendance 43 128 @ 24 £153.12 audited 14 April 1789 D , New York State Library, Albany. H was elected to the Continental Congress on January 22, 1788. He served from February 25 to October 10, 1788.
[ New York ] April 14, 1789 . Acknowledges receipt of £112 for services as counsel in a controversy between New York and Massachusetts. DS , Rosenbach Foundation, Philadelphia. For information on H’s services as counsel for New York in a controversy between that state and Massachusetts, see “Notes on the History of North and South America,” December, 1786 . Also see H to the Agents of the...
In mine of the 25th of February last, I observed, that there were reasons to conclude that the Governor’s conduct, immediately after the evacuation of this city, had been influenced by condescentions to those who were at the time advocates for persecution, which in some measure involved him in their policy; and in confirmation of this idea I mentioned some circumstances, as they then presented...
For the New-York Journal, &c. Mr. Greenleaf, You are requested to publish this address in your Next Thursday’s paper. By order of the Committee, Alex Hamilton, Chairman. New-York, April 7, 1789. To the Independent and Patriotic Electors Of the State of NewYork. In our last address, we mentioned to you our intention of offering some remarks upon that which has been lately published by the...
The Committee appointed to promote the election of Judge Yates as Governor have requested Mr. John Jackson a Merchant of this City to proceed into your County for the purpose of making such communications to the inhabitants of it as may be necessary to inform them of the reasons which influence this City & County in desiring a change in the person of the Chief Magistrate. From the opinion we...
To the Independent and Patriotic Electors of the State of NewYork. It is not long since we addressed you on the subject of the ensuing election of a chief magistrate, and communicated to you the proceedings, which had then taken place in this city in relation to it. Within a few days past, there has appeared an address signed by Mr. Jonathan Lawrence, as the chairman of a committee, said to...
The bearer of this is a Mr. Claxton, who is desirous of being a messenger or something equivalent. I feel an interest in his success, as he is a man of qualifications superior to his present aims. His memorial, which he will deliver you, is of his own drafting, by which you will perceive that he has some literary pretension. He has followed the Printing business; but from the ill effect of it...
Circumstances prevented my seeing a certain Gentleman. But I have reflected more fully on the subject of our conversation. I continue strongly inclined to the opinion that the Council ought to have canvassed prior to the day appointed for the Meeting of Congress upon the returns then before them, and that the subsequent canvass has been irregular and is void. But as to the second point—the...
H___ G___, for public reasons does not think it expedient to relinquish the character in which he appears in the newspapers; nor does he consider it as necessary to do so, for either of the purposes mentioned by Mr. Willett. Mr. W___ being a mere volunteer in the business, can at any rate have no claim to such a relinquishment. He will do well to recollect, that he did not confine himself to...
I wrote to you on Wednesday evening, respecting the circumstances attending the suppression of a certain proclamation issued by the Council for the temporary Government of the Southern district, on account of the conduct of Sears Lamb and Willet in stopping Rivington’s press. It runs in my mind very strongly, that I was informed by Mr. Benson & yourself that the Governor had stayed the...
I perceive by this day’s Advertiser that you have thought proper to come forward, with an air of triumph, to contradict a fact alledged in my sixth letter respecting a proclamation of the council for the temporary government of the southern district. You have been pleased to preface it with some general observations, and among the rest to make a profession of your faith in the virtue of the...
Some short time after the evacuation of this City, on the occasion of certain irregularities committed (I think by Sears and others in regard to Rivington) The Council for the temporary government came to some resolution, or agreed upon some proclamation of a spirited nature for discountenan[c]ing such proceedings which was delivered to the Governor to publish. He kept it in his hands and did...
[ New York, March 17, 1789. ] On this date Hamilton’s name was listed as one of the subscribers to the New-York Manufacturing Society. The [New York] Daily Advertiser , March 17, 1789. The New-York Manufacturing Society had been organized on January 7, 1789. At a later meeting it was resolved to raise a fund by subscription for the establishment of a woolen factory, the shares to be £10 each....
[ New York ] March 11, 1789 . At a meeting of the New York Society of the Cincinnati “held on the 11th of March, at the Holland Lodge, Hamilton informed the Society that he intended to move at the next meeting, for the following By-Law, to be annexed to those already established by the Society, to wit: ‘That each Treasurer of the Society, before he enters upon the execution of his office,...
The last of the circumstances mentioned by me in my letter of the 26th of February, as evincive of the inimical disposition of the governor towards the union, is that he is unfriendly to the residence of Congress in this city. This may be inferred from the disrespectful manner in which he has treated that honorable body, aggregately and individually, as detailed in some former letters; and...
22H. G. Letter XII, 8 March 1789 (Hamilton Papers)
The seventh of the circumstances enumerated in proof of his Excellency’s enmity to the Union is, That he has continued his opposition to the new constitution even since its adoption by this state. There are two kinds of opposition, direct and indirect. The Governor must have been an idiot to have rendered himself chargeable with the first kind. It would have brought the resentment of the whole...
I A March 7th. 1789 Army in old Emissions Dr. To John Pierce Pay Master General, his account old emissions For Five thousand six hundred and twenty nine dollars 30/90 old Emissions that Lieut Col: Hamilton late aid de Camp to General Washington, credits on the settlement of his account at the Treasury the 2nd instant the specie value of which deducted from the amount   in Specie 5.629.30 O.E....
The next in order of the circumstances, alledged in proof of the unfriendly disposition of the Governor to the Union, is that he opposed the new constitution after it appeared, with unreasonable obstinacy . To judge of the propriety of this observation, it ought to be recollected, that the merits or demerits of that constitution must after all, be in a great measure a speculative question,...
25H. G. Letter XI, 6 March 1789 (Hamilton Papers)
One of the circumstances stated to you in mine of the 26th of February, to shew that the Governor is unfriendly to the UNION, is that he prejudged and condemned the new Constitution before it was framed. This fact has been long since given to the public; to which no other answer, that I have heard, has been made by his Excellency, or his friends, than that he as a citizen had a right to...
26H. G. Letter X, 4 March 1789 (Hamilton Papers)
Sometime in the latter part of the year 1785, or beginning of 1786, the state of Virginia proposed the holding a convention for the purpose of devising some system of commercial regulations for the United States. This state among others acceded to the proposition; and the deputies from different states appointed pursuant to it met at Annapolis in the fall of 1786. But the number actually...
It is in my opinion intirely necessary that the Common Council should be convened this day in order to pass an act for appropriating the City Hall to the use of Congress. This act should be published in the papers & notified by yourself, or if you are not well enough by a committee or member of your board to the senators & representatives as they arrive. The Philadelphians are endeavouring to...
Having been appointed by two different, and very numerous meetings of the inhabitants of this city, among other purposes, for that of forwarding the election of John Lawrence, Esq. as the representative of this district in Congress, we think it our duty to state to such of you as may not have been present at those meetings, what we understand to have been the motives to his nomination, and the...
29H. G. Letter IX, 3 March 1789 (Hamilton Papers)
I have mentioned as a third circumstance tending to prove the enmity of the Governor to the UNION, “That his behaviour towards the individuals composing Congress has been of a nature calculated to give them just cause of disgust.” I am well informed, that his Excellency never made a visit to, or had any intercourse of civilities with either of the two last Presidents of Congress. This neglect...
The second particular, which I have stated as evidence of Mr. Clinton’s enmity to the union, is, that he has treated Congress as a body in a contemptuous manner. A proof of this exists in his refusal to convene the legislature of this state, in the year 1786, upon pressing and repeated applications of Congress; sheltering himself under the frivolous pretence, that the constitution did not...