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I have recommended to the Secretary at War, Mr Philip Church, my nephew, for the appointment of a Captan of Infantry—This young Gentleman is personally known to you; but your knowlege of him is too slight to render it useless to speak of his qualifications. To the advantages of a good education, he adds a very discreet judicious mind and an excellent heart—duly animated by that laudable pride...
The very obliging manner, in which you was pleased to assure me of the appointment of my nephew Philip Church , and the actual appointment of my relation Captan Hamilton to a Lieutenancy in the Navy, which I just learn from the Marine Department, are circumstances from which I derive much pleasure, which I consider as conferring upon me a personal obligation, and for which I beg you to accept...
I shall with pleasure obey the command contained in your letter of the 17th instant and shall accordingly inform the Governor that I am ready to proceed in the execution of the measure. With perfect respect and esteem / I have the honor to be / Sir / Yr Obed Servant MHi : Adams Papers.
General Wilkinson, who has been some weeks in this City, in consequence of an invitation having for object the readjustment of our Western Military affairs, is about to make a journey to Braintree to pay his respects to you. On such an occasion, I hope it will not be thought improper that I should address you on the subject of this officer; since what I shall say will accord with what I know...
I had the honor of receiving, an hour since, your letter of the 22d instant, with the copy of one to you from Colonel Smith. I am happy to think that the question presented is on mere military principles a very simple one. The rule of promotion, by succession, does not in any service, as far as my knowlege goes, apply to a new corps, in its first organisation. Officers for such a corps, it is...
It has been repeatedly mentioned to me that you have, on different occasions, asserted the existence of a British Faction in this Country, embracing a number of leading or influential characters of the Federal Party (as usually denominated) and that you have sometimes named me, at other times plainly alluded to me, as one of this description of persons: And I have likewise been assured that of...
The time which has elapsed since my letter of the first of August last was delivered to you precludes the further expectation of an answer. From this silence, I will draw no inference; nor will I presume to judge of the fitness of silence on such an occasion, on the part of the Chief Magistrate of a Republic, towards a citizen, who without a stain has discharged so many important public...
I have considered with attention the draft of instructions to Mr. Bayard, which appear to me full and judicious. There are but two points upon which I would submit a reflection or two— I It is prescribed that no money shall be advanced for any quantity of land purchased more than in the proportion of the intire sum to the intire quantity. It is possible that this restriction may be...
[ New York, March 8, 1797. On March 9, 1797, Morris wrote to Hamilton : “I have this moment received yours of yesterday.” Letter not found. ]
New York, March 10, 1797. “… You will oblige me by letting me know what have been the laws & practice of Maryland with regard to naturalization—pointing me to the parts of its Constitution & laws which respect the subject. I have under consideration an important question of Insurance in which this inquiry is necessary.” ALS , Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Tilghman was born...
I have asserted, that the conduct of Great-Britain towards us and other neutral powers has been at no period so exceptionable, as that of France at the present juncture. A more distinct view of this truth may be useful, which will be assisted by a retrospect of the principal acts of violation on both sides. Tho the circumstance was cotemporarily disclosed in all of our newspapers, yet so blind...
It is now ascertained that Mr Pinckney has been refused and with circumstances of indignity. What is to be done? The share I have had in the public administration added to my interest as a Citizen make me extremely anxious that at this delicate Crisis a course of conduct exactly proper may be adopted. I offer to your consideration without ceremony what appears to me such a course. First. I...
It has been seen that the Governt of France has an indisputable title to the culpable preeminence of having taken the lead in the violation of neutral rights; and that the first instance on the part of the British Government is nearly a month posterior to the commencement of the evil by France. But it was not only posterior—it was also less comprehensive. That of France extended to all...
The post of yesterday brought me your letter of the day before. I regret that the idea of a Commission extraordinary appears of doubtful propriety. For after very mature reflection I am intirely convinced of its expediency. I do not understand the passage you cite as excluding the reception of a special extraordinary Minister but of an ordinary resident Minister. It seems impossible that the...
General Pinckney, appointed minister plenipotentiary from the United States to the French Republic, left Philadelphia near the end of September, and arrived at Paris the 5th of December last, in the evening. On the 6th, he sent, by his secretary, to Mr. Monroe his letters of recall; and immediately afterwards waited on Mr. Monroe, who shewed him a letter from M. Delacroix, the French Minister...
Every one who can properly appreciate the situation of our Affairs at this moment, in all the extent of possible circumstances, must be extremely anxious for such a course of conduct in our Government which will unite the utmost prudence with energy. It has been a considerable time my wish that a Commission extraordinary Madison Pinkney Cabot should be constituted to go to France to explain...
Take my ideas and weigh them of a proper course of conduct for our administration in the present juncture. You have called Congress—tis well. When the Senate meets (which I should be glad to see anticipated) send a Commission extraordinary to France. Let it consist of Jefferson or Madison Pinckney & a third very safe man, say Cabot . Proclaim a Religious solemnity to take place at the Meeting...
I have received your letter of the 30th. with the statement inclosed. I do not believe that its publication would have any influence upon the question of a rupture with France; but yet, as it seems that those who surround the President are not agreed in the matter—as an opinion is industriously circulated that too much fuel has been added by the publications of the Government—as it is...
[ New York, April 1, 1797. On April 6, 1797, Tracy wrote to Hamilton : “I thank you for your Letter of the 1st. inst.” Letter not found. ] Tracy was United States Senator from Connecticut and the state’s attorney for Litchfield County.
The fourth & last installment of the purchase money of the Cosby Manor Lands has become due. It is 1655 Dollars & 50 Cents of which your ¼ is 413. Dollars & 87 Cents. I beg the favour of you to lose no time in forwarding this Sum to me. With esteem   Yr very hum ser ALS , Detroit Public Library. For an explanation of the contents of this letter, see the introductory note to Philip Schuyler to...
I have received My Dear Sir Your letter of the with your little work accompanying it, which I shall read with the interest I take in the author, the first leisure hour. I have cast my eye over it and like very much the plan. Our affairs are indeed very critical. But I am sorry to find that I do not agree with several of my friends. I am clearly of opinion for an extraordinary mission and as...
I have received your letter of March 31. I hope nothing in my last was misunderstood. Could it be necessary I would assure you that no one has a stronger convinction than myself of the purity of the motives which direct your public Conduct or of the good sense and judgment by which it is guided. If I have a fear (you will excuse my frankness), it is lest the strength of your feelings, the...
I thank you, My Dear Sir, for your letter of the 6th. of February. The intelligence that the Directory have ordered away our Minister is every way unpleasant. It portends too much a formal Rupture as the only alternative to an ignominious submission. Much public feeling has been excited. But the Government, I trust and believe, will continue prudent and do every thing that honor permits...
Since my last to you I have perused with great satisfaction your little work on our Governments. I like the execution no less than the plan. If my health & leisure should permit, I would make some notes, but you cannot depend on it, as I am not only extremely occupied but in feeble health. I send you My ideas of the course of Conduct proper in our present situation. It is unpleasant to me to...
It must be acknowleged by all who can comprehend the subject that the present situation of the UStates is in an extreme degree critical, demanding in our public councils a union of the greatest prudence with the greatest firmness. To appreciate rightly the course which ought to be pursued it is an essential preliminary to take an accurate view of the situation. That the preservation of peace...
The post of today brought me a letter from you. I am just informed that an order is come to the Custom House not to clear out any Vessel if armed , unless destined for the East Indies. Under the present circumstances I very much doubt the expediency of this measure. The excesses of France justify passiveness in the Government and its inability to protect the Merchants required that it should...
We arrived here last Evening well and shall proceed immediately on our journey. I forgot my brief in the cause of Le Guen against Gouverneur which is in a bundle of papers in my armed Chair in the Office. Request one of the Gentlemen to look for it and send it up to me by the post of Tuesday. Beg them not to fail. Adieu My beloved. Kiss all the Children for me. Yrs. ALS , Mr. George T....
I informed you My Darling by a letter which will go by post of my arrival here in good health and finding your family well. But this morning your papa has an attack of the Gout, not particularly severe, one indeed which in a different situation would give no uneasiness—but as his strength has been of late somewhat diminished, it is impossible not to feel anxiety about him. On the whole I...
The consideration for the candidates in the better part of the community stands nearly thus. Clarkeson , ver Plank , Fish = Walker , Burrall , Giles ,
Lest my Dear Eliza any circumstance should have prevented your departure before this reaches you, I conclude to drop you a line to tell you your Father is considerably better at the same time considering the delicate state of his health generally I am very desirous you should come up as he is. Yrs. Most Affec ALS , Hamilton Papers, Library of Congress. For background to this letter, see H to...