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Summary of the opinion of the General Officers upon the propriety of attacking New York in the Campaign of 1780 Genl Greene. States the Enemy’s force in New York at 11,000 Regular Troops—Militia & Refugees 4,500—Sailors & Marines 3,500—Total 19,000—and Our force at 8,000 Contls—Recruits for Regr Ballns 12,000 (of 16,000 demanded)—Militia 8,000—French Troops 6,000—In all 34,000. Is very...
At a meeting of a board of Genl Officers held the 4th July 1780 pursuant to a General Order of the 3d Present Major General’s Greene Marquis dela Fayette Brigadier General’s Maxwell The Board adjourned untill tomorrow 9. o’Clock A.M. July 5th the Board met agreeable to adjournment. Present Major General’s Greene Lord Stirling Marquis dela Fayette Brigadier Genls Maxwell
Majr Genl Greene Is under present appearances, for discontinuing our preparations against New York, and givg up the Enterprize, unless a considerable reinforcement should arrive immediately from the West Indies. In that case, tho’ he has no sanguine hopes of success he thinks a co-operation should be attempted with our allies agt New York. Keeping the Continental force (now in this Quarter)...
To locate the army to any particular spots, may facilitate the Enemies getting possession of advantageous grounds, either upon one or the other of our flanks. It appears to us more proper therefore, that we move the troops upon the high and advantageous grounds, according as the motions of the enemy may indicate an intention to make an impression at particular places. Having examined the...
In Obedience to Your Excellency’s Orders, we have considered the Matters referred to Us, & beg leave to recommend the following Signals to be given from Roxbury, in Case of any Movement of The Enemy to Distress our People at Dorchester Hill: Signal in Case the Enemy begin to Embarque, a Flagg on Roxbury meeting House; If they Actually Land at Dorchester Two Flaggs, One, over the Other; In case...
Remarks on the Resolution of Congress of the 25th February 1780—requiring each State to furnish certain species of supplies for the support of the Army. The measure seems to be calculated, more for the convenience of each state, than for the accommodation of the service. The aggregate quantity ordered, tho’ far short of the demands of the army, is proportioned on the states, in such a manner,...
It gives me the greatest pain to hear the murmurs and complaints among the officers for the want of spirits—they say they are exposd to the severity of the weather subject to hard duty and nothing but bread and beef to eat morning, noon, and night, without vegetables or any thing to drink but cold water—this is hard fare for people that have been accustomd to live tolerable—The officers...
Inclosd is a letter from Mr Levi Hollingsworth relative to the situation of the Stores in that quarter —General Mughlenburg has marched with his detachment to cover the removeal of the Stores—If your Excellency thinks any additional force is necessary it shall be sent immediately—I wait your further Orders and am your Excellencies Most Obedient & very humbl. Servt ALS , DLC:GW . Robert Hanson...
I wrote your Excellency the 8th of February since which I am without your favor. In my last I informed you that I had written to Count Rochambeau for reinforcements. Inclosed is his answer. I am persuaded he must have mistaken your intentions. I find nothing is to be expected from that quarter. I am sorry the Legion was put in motion as it may raise the enemy’s apprehensions, and bring upon us...
Inclosed is a copy of my letter to Congress which contains all material matters of occurrence since I wrote your Excellency before. Capt. Shutrick, who transacts the business for Major Hyrne in the commissary of Prisoners department since his misfortune has transmitted a copy of the State of that business in this quarter and upon examination I found Major Hyrne had forwarded one a few days...
Your Excellencys favor of the 24th I had the honor of receiving last Evening. I dind yesterday with the Minister of France and find him still determind to set out for Camp to morrow. He sets out at seven in the morning and intends lodging at Trenton. On Wednesday he will be in Camp, if no accident attends him; but at what hour cannot be assertaind as the place he dines at, is not yet determind...
General Wayne wrote me last Evening that all his troops had crost over the River Delaware into the Jerseys—He intends to collect all the Stock and burn all the Hay along the River that will be within the reach of the Enemy—If he executes the business effectually the only chance the Enemy will have of forageing will be between Schuylkill and the Delaware—I am told there is considerable Hay upon...
Philadelphia is an object of such magnitude, the prejudices of the People in the surrounding States so strong, in its fervor, as to its importance, and consequence, the manufactories & supplies for the Army so numerous in that City, that the loss of it would so effect the Country, and the Army, that very great injury would arise to the common cause of America. to prevent so great an evil, it...
While I was in philadelphia, I wrote your Excellency, that I had little prospect of being able, either to provide for the march of the Maryland Troops to the southard, or to put this army in motion. Lest you should suppose that the prospects have mended, and be about to take measures accordingly, I think it my duty to inform you, that the former embarrassments still continue, and that new...
An idle surmise of Mr. Banks, and an improper curiosity of General Scott in the State of Virginia, may give an unjust complexion to the late transaction respecting the measures taken to obtain clothing, as the Governor of Virginia writes, that it was considered a mere speculation for private emolument. For fear, such rumors should spread to my disadvantage, I take the liberty to enclose you a...
I have examind the prisoners and find them to be a poor parcel of Ignorant Cowardly fellows. Two are Taylors named John & James Dunbar, and the other two are common labourers named Isaac Petit & Will Smith. They candidly confess they set off with an intention of going to Statten Island, but not with any intention of Joining the Enemy; but to get out of the way of fighting here. I believe the...
I am just favored with your Excellency’s letter of the 18th of March. I wrote you in my letter of the 22d April that a spirit of mutiny and discontent had got footing in the Army. hanging the serjeant and sending off five others belonging to the Pennsylvania and Maryland Line has happily put a check to it, and the troops appear now of quite a different temper, altho’ their sufferings still...
I do myself the honor to inclose Your Excellency a return of the Troops under my command, and take the Liberty to request you will order a copy made out for the Board of War as I have been able only to obtain one copy and that just as the Express was about to set out. I am with every Sentiment of esteem & respect Your Most Obedt ser. NjP : DeCoppet Collection.
Major Burnet and Col. Dehart has just returnd from the Equacanock [Pequannock] and say that there is (as to wood Water & Sandy soil) a most excellent position, within about four Miles of Equacanock [Forks of Pequannock] and five of the great falls, it is distant 15 Miles from Newark ferry, and twenty from Elizabeth town. The left will be coverd by the Pasaic: It lies in a plentiful Country of...
I find in yesterdays orders I am directed to attend the Board of General Offic⟨ers⟩ for settleing the Rank of the Line of Artillery. your Excellency must be sensible th⟨at⟩ the duties of the quarter masters Department are a sufficent employment for the most active mind. I consider my being put up⟨on⟩ these Boards therefore a public injury; bu⟨t⟩ as I seem to be excluded in the present...
Inclosed I send your Excellency a letter from Colo. Hay covering some conditions proposed by the Ship–carpenters at Fish Kill on which to engage in the Continental service. I have had the letter by me some days and have defered giving an answer untill things were in such a train as to enable me to judge whether we should stand in need of their services or not. But this being settled in your...
The position which Lord Sterling and Col. Abeel wrote such a flattering account about, has nothing but water and naked ground to recommend it, for I dont believe there is one quarter wood enough to supply the Troops through the Winter. I rode all day yesterday, and all day to day in search of a position, but without the least success. I have searched the Country pretty thoroughly from...
Prospect Hill, 21 February 1776 . Mr Davids has been chosen chaplain for Varnum’s and Bond’s regiments, and Mr Noble chosen chaplain for Hitchcock’s and Little’s regiments. ALS , DLC:GW . Ebenezer David (c.1752–1778), who was ordained by the Sabbatarian Church of Newport on 31 May 1775, began serving as a chaplain in January 1776. It is said that he returned his commission to GW and acted as a...
Since I wrote your Excellency last, I have taken an entire new position with the Army. One part is with me on this river about 80 Miles from Charlotte, and the other is with Genl. Morgan on Broad river, on the West side of the Catawba about 60 Miles from Charlotte. The State of the provisions as well as many other reasons rendered this measure necessary. Lord Cornwallis continues in the...
2 March 1776 . “I visited the . . . Guards in the left and Center Division and . . . found all the Guards in Good Order—Capt. Lewis reported Eight oClock this Morning Five sail of Ships were Coming into Boston. . . . N.B. Joel Hewit of Col. Sargeants Regiment & Francis Offy of Col. Greytons Regt confined in the Main Guard at Cambridge for Mutiny & Disobedience of Orders.” ADS , DNA : RG 93,...
In my despatches of the 29th Ultimo, I did myself the honor to acquaint your Excellency with the disposition I had made to counteract the movements of the enemy, and to protect the Country from their depredations. Lord Cornwallis continued at Weymissbury, making every preparation, and compleatly equiping his troops for the most active operations, untill the 9th Instant; when having been joined...
Inclosd is a Letter receivd last Evening from Mr Patterson. The contents are not the most agreeable; and how it comes directed through me to your Excellency I cannot imagin. He mentions there being a greater number of Boats upon the Susquehannah then he gave an account of when at Camp. Will it not be best to lessen the number orderd to be built; if the proper sizd ones can be had already fit...
Benjamin Cattle Esquire an inhabitant of South Carolina lately in the Continental Army and one of the Governors privy Council has been in a declining state of health for a long time. It has been recommended to him by his physician, and friends to go to the Northward by winter to New York for the recovery of his health, and General Leslie has been polite enough to grant him the necessary...
By an Express from Major Clarke stationed at Dobbs ferry I find the Enemy are encampt right opposite, to the number of between three and five thousand—and the Major adds from their disposition and search after Boats they design to cross the River—A frigate and two Transports or Provision Ships past the Cheveau de frize Night before last—they were prodigiously shatterd from the fire of our...
Inclosed is a copy of my Letter to Congress containing an account of the operations of the detachment mentioned in my last gone towards Charles Town for the purpose of attacking the Enemys lower Posts. The success was less than I expected or than the opportunity promised; however upon the whole many advantages have resulted from the manoeuvre. Major Hyrne our Commissary of Prisoners has...