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In obedience to a vote of the Standing Committee of the Washington Society I have the honor to transmit to you the enclosed Card, and to request that you will honor the Society with your presence on the ensuing Anniversary of American Independence. With respect, / your most obt Servt— MHi : Adams Papers.
Robert Morris, Esquire, Financier for the United States, has in his advertisements for receiving proposals for contracts for supplying the army with rations, directed them to be made to me, in the States of North and South Carolina and Georgia; but in his letter of the 17th of October, 1782, he desires me to commit the business to your care and management, should I find it more convenient for...
Misfortunes are more or less painful, as they have been brought upon us by folly, extravagance, or imposed by public necessity. Those of the latter kind may be distressing, but cannot be dishonorable. I have long struggled with difficulties, in which I was involved, while in command to the southward, and which I should have laid before Congress, at an earlier period, but from a hope, that I...
[ New York ] August 16, 1785 . On this date Hamilton witnessed a power of attorney from Greene to Wadsworth. DS , signed by Nathanael Greene and witnessed by H and Dirck Ten Broeck. Connecticut State Library, Hartford.
This letter will be handed you by my friend Mr. John McQueen whose principal errand to Paris is to form a contract for live oak on which I wrote you some time since. I beg leave to recommend him to your good offices on the business which he comes but I hope the matter may be so managed that our propositions may not interfere with each other. Mr. McQueen can give you full history of the...
[ Charleston, S.C., 1 June 1785 . Recorded in SJL as received 3 Sep. 1785. Not found.]
Some little time ago Capt. Gunn formerly an officer in the horse sent me a challenge to fight him upon the footing of equality as Citizens. His reasons for it are he says I injured him in a tryal while I was in command in this Country. He sold a public horse and was called to account for it. To avoid breaking him I refered the matter to a board of Officers in preference to a Court Martial. I...
Mr Watson by whom this will be handed you having some things for you brought with him from England and having it in contemplation to call at Mount Vernon it gives me an opportunity to inform you of my safe arrival with my family. I found Mrs Greene and the children all in good health. I hope the Marquis arrivd safe in Virginia. A report prevails here that his Frigate is cast away near the...
My ill health and the distressing situation of my private affairs for some time past has claimed too much of my Attention to afford me either time or inclination to attend to any thing else. At the time of the meeting of the Cincinnati in Philadelphia I had a dangerous and disagree[able] pain in my breast. It had hung about me then upwards of two months; but by the use of balsam of firr soon...
Since I wrote you by Col. Henley I took a ride to Boston to try my strength and see how traveling would affect me. It increased my complaint but not so much as to discourage my attempting to be at the Cincinnati had not my complaint increased since my return. The Doctor thinks my life would be endangered by attempting to cross the Water and my pain in my stomach increased by riding by land. In...
Your two letters of the 20th and 27th of March both came safe to hand. My indisposition is such I fear it will not be in my power to comply with your wishes if there was no other obstacle. I have a constant pain in my breast and am now so weak as to be incapable of bearing the fatigues of a Journey. Besides which the Doctor thinks it would be dangerous to go by water for fear I might burst a...
I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 28th of December last, and having had the Honor of being appointed President of the Cincinnati of Rhode Island, I embrace the earliest opportunity of giving you an Answer. General Varnum, Major Lyman, and myself, are in the appointment to attend the annual General meeting of the order. It is not expected more than One will attend the meeting....
I return your Excellency many thanks for your polite letter accompanying the resolution of Congress, complimenting me with a couple of Cannon. I am not very certain where those Cannon are, but I believe two are in Virginia & three in So. Carolina, and it is no less difficult for me to determine where I would wish those sent which are made choice of for me. If those in So. Carolina should be...
Several Officers belonging to the Southern Army have made application to me to use my interest with your Excellency for obtaining appointments in the peace establishment. Col. Harmer was among the first and a better Officer cannot be found; his whole soul is in pursuit of the profession of Arms. Col. Men t gez is also exceeding anxious to be put upon the establishment both from his fondness...
I am this far on my way to the Northward and should have had the happiness of seeing you before this but have been sick with a fever at Alexandria. I dined at Mount Vernon and went to Alexandria in the Evening and that night was taken with a fever which lasted me nine days. For six days I had no intermission and but little remission. My fever is gone but has left me exceeding weak. While it...
When I wrote you last I did not expect to address you from this place again; but Col. Carrington has detained me upwards of a week to complete the business of his department. On Thursday next we set off by land for the Northward. The Assembly of this State have rejected the impost Act recommended by Congress. Had your circular letter been printed a fortnight earlier I am persuaded it would...
The bearer of this Mr Clarke was an inhabitant of the City of Philadelphia and went off with the british Army when they left that place in—78. He is an old acquaintance of Col. Lawrens’s the late President of Congress and was introduced to me by Lt Col. John Lawrens his Son as a very deserving character altho he had been unfortunate in joining the enemy. He rendered us considerable service in...
I have received an order, since your Excellencys letter of the 18th May from the War office, and a resolution of Congress for sending the troops to their respective states, and for furloughing them until the definitive treaty is signed. In consequence of which, I have sent home the North Carolinians, furloughed the troops of this State and Georgia, and expect to embark most of the rest in a...
I am now sick with a fever and almost blind with sore Eyes. I only write this Leter to apoligize for not writing. Mrs Greene who will have the pleasure of delivering this letter embarks to day for Philadelphia. Her health is so much improved I am anxious to get her to the Northward notwithstanding my own situation. Mrs Greene will deliver your Excellency a Green silk embroidered pattern for a...
I beg leave to Congratulate your Excellency upon the returning smiles of peace, and the happy establishment of our Independence. This important event must be doubly welcome to you who has so successfully conducted the War, thro’ such a variety of difficulties to so happy a close. If universal respect, and the general Affections of a grateful Country can compensate for the many painful hours...
I have the honor to inclose Your Excellency a Return of the Army for the month of March. I am with great esteem Your Excellency’s Obedt Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Persuaded that your Excellency, would wish to have good information upon every subject, before you take your ultimate determination upon a place of operations, I shall take the liberty of laying before you a slight sketch, of the political disorders, & military resources of the Southern States. As I am entrusted with the command here; the people will expect it of me, and as your Excellency...
I have been honor’d with your Excellencys despatches of the 18th of December, and 29th of January. I am made happy by your full approbation of my conduct and the Army under my command, during the Southern operations. The evacuation of Charles Town, & the proposals of Peace, are matters highly interesting to this Country, whose finances, and political arrangements, are in the most deplorable...
I do myself the honor to enclose your Excellency the returns of the Southern Army for the Month of January. With due respect and esteem, I have the honor to be your most obedient humble servant Not Assigned.
An idle surmise of Mr. Banks, and an improper curiosity of General Scott in the State of Virginia, may give an unjust complexion to the late transaction respecting the measures taken to obtain clothing, as the Governor of Virginia writes, that it was considered a mere speculation for private emolument. For fear, such rumors should spread to my disadvantage, I take the liberty to enclose you a...
“Lieutenant Colonel Carrington has closed a contract with Mr. Banks for the subsistence of the army, at something [less] than eleven pence sterling. It is high, but it could not be had lower. There was not an offer made but by Mr. Banks, although I wrote to all the principal men in the country. People have not that spirit for engaging in business, here, as with us. “I shall get the troops...
Your letter of the 18th of September, by Mr. Hayward, with the Bills enclosed, I forgot to acknowledge in my last. He promises me the money very soon; Mr. Drayton also promises to pay me very shortly. The clothier’s, quarter master’s and medical departments, together with the bills drawn for two months pay for the officers, give me no small uneasiness, for fear the amount should exceed your...
It having been suggested from an interpretation of my letter of October 1782, to Mr. James Hunter, that the honorable Major-General Greene was interested, or intimated a desire of holding a commercial connection with me in Charleston; I do, therefore, as well for the sake of removing such an idea, as to avert from myself any mischief, that a heedless surmise, expressed in a confidential letter...
The comfortable condition, in which you have put the army, from the large supply of blankets and clothing furnished it, claims my particular acknowledgments; for, although I expect the public will make you a reasonable compensation, yet, as you were the only person, who had the will and the means to serve us, our obligation is equally great. I am happy to find, that most, if not all our...
“You will see by some of my former letters, that, in consequence of your orders, I had taken measures, to provide such articles of clothing, as were necessary to complete the troops with their winter clothing. Messrs. Banks and Company have furnished most of the articles we shall want, and will provide the rest. Mr. Hamilton, the clothier, had instructions to contract with such as would supply...
I do myself the honor to inclose your Excellency a copy of my letter to Congress containing an account of the evacuation of Charles Town, on which happy event I beg leave to congratulate you. It has been long in expectation, and for some time past seemed to hang in doubtful suspence. This, together with the liberation of all the militia on parole in the southern States, places them on the most...
I have taken the liberty to inclose to your Excellencys care a number of family letters from Mrs Greene and my self to our friends in Rhode Island; the whole under cover to Governor Greene. I am not informed whether letters go to the Governors free from postage. If they do not, I beg you will be kind enough to give them a private conveyance by the first safe opportunity. I should not have...
I doubt not your Excellency expected to hear of the evacuation of Charles Town long before this. The enemy are not yet gone altho’ now just upon the eve of this departure. In two days more the town will be free. Your letter of the 23d of Sepr I just acknowledged in Novr with a promise to give it a more full answer at a future day. The Minister at War sent me an order for incorporating &...
Inclosed I have the honor to transmit Your Excellency a Return for the Month of November of the infantry, cavalry, Artillery, and the Legion serving in the Southern Department. I am Your Excellency’s Most obedient Humble Servant DLC : Papers of George Washington.
“I am taking measures to obtain clothing for the troops. We have on hand but a small part of our winter clothing, and after what we shall be obliged to issue to those troops going northwardly, we shall have but a small pittance left. I imagine, our purchases will amount to not less than forty thousand dollars, for which I shall draw bills on the Financier; and, as I provide the clothing, at...
I have the honor to enclose your Excellency the returns of this Army for the Month of October. In my next dispatch perhaps I may have the pleasure to congratulate you on the evacuation of Charles Town. This event I expected would have taken place long before this, but some particular circumstances have occurred to prevent it; and I believe they will not leave this Country untill about the 20th...
I am much obliged by your Excellency’s long and communicative letters of the 9th of July and 6th of August. Since my letter of the 26th of August the evacuation of Charles Town is reduced to a certainty. The following disposition it is said is to be made of the troops in garrison. Lord Rawdon’s corps which is put upon the british establishment as the 105th Regt is going directly to Ireland....
Since I wrote your Excellency a day or two ago Lt Colo. Laurens has been killed in an Action on the Combahee River about fifty miles south of our Camp. The Enemy made a detachment into that quarter with a number of armed Vessels, empty Sloops and Schooners with about 500 Infantry to collect Rice. General Gist with the Light Troops, in which Lt Colo. Laurens held a command, was detached to...
From present appearances and what is past one would be led to conclude the enemy mean to change the whole plan of the war for a time or that they are taking measures to bring about a peace. Which is their object or whether either, is what I could wish to have your sentiments on. I am much at a loss how to take some measures of a private nature and shall esteem it a particular mark of your...
Inclosed I send your Excellency a duplicate of my letter of the 12th Inst. As it is necessary you should be early and fully informed of what is going on in this quarter, and as conveyances are subject to interception I think this precaution requisite to guard against any evil which a circumstance of that kind might produce. Since I wrote you last two fleets have passed this latitude...
I have great reason to believe as well from appearances as from the enemy’s declarations that they will evacuate Charlestown very soon. I hinted something of the kind in my letter of the 11th of July which I hope has been recieved. Appearances then were equivocal, they now seem to wear a face of certainty. They have left the Quarter-house, requested the inhabitants to hold themselves in...
My letter of the 7th Ulto covering the returns of the army, I hope has been safely delivered. Since which I have been duly honoured with your Excellencys favours of the 23d of April and 22d of May. The troops have been so badly cloathed and the season is so very hot that many of the soldiery have been seized with fevers which render them unfit for service although it has by no means proved...
Benjamin Cattle Esquire an inhabitant of South Carolina lately in the Continental Army and one of the Governors privy Council has been in a declining state of health for a long time. It has been recommended to him by his physician, and friends to go to the Northward by winter to New York for the recovery of his health, and General Leslie has been polite enough to grant him the necessary...
I have the honor to transmit Your Excellency the monthly return of the Army under my command. I am Your Excellency’s Most Obedient & Most Humble Sert MiU-C : Nathanael Greene Papers.
I had the honor of informing your Excellency in a letter of the 19th instant that a dangerous spirit of discontent had been discovered in the Army, and of the measures I took to suppress it. I am happy to inform you that this spirit seems intirely to have subsided, as the persons who fomented it are removed at a distance from the troops: and, as we have now a prospect of some cloathing and...
Fortune seems to smile upon the perseverence of Great Britain, Count de Grass’s defeat mentioned in my official letters appears to be much more important than I expected. Since I wrote I have seen Admiral Rodneys letter. Cout de Grass is a prisoner and has lost six Ships of the line; and I fear the rest of the fleet are so shattered as to be incapable of attempting any thing for a long time....
I am just favored with your Excellency’s letter of the 18th of March. I wrote you in my letter of the 22d April that a spirit of mutiny and discontent had got footing in the Army. hanging the serjeant and sending off five others belonging to the Pennsylvania and Maryland Line has happily put a check to it, and the troops appear now of quite a different temper, altho’ their sufferings still...
I was honoured by your Excellency’s letter of the 2d Ulto two days since. The enemy continue in the same position as when M.Genl St Clair left this army; however from various circumstances I am led to believe they are making preparations for a forward movement, and am apprehensive for the consequences of such an event. Our force is inferior to the enemy and in a distressed situation the men...
General St Clair being on the return to the northward affords me an opportunity to inform your Excellency of the safe arrival of Mrs Greene and to return you my sinsere and grateful acknowledgements for your kindness to her. She spent some time at Mount Vernon and was most agreeably entertained. Her journey was disagreeable and beset with many difficulties; but the politeness and hospitality...
Your Excellency’s Letters of the 26th of January, and 18th of February have both been received. But I am afraid some of the Northern dispatches have been taken by the Enemy, and carried into Charles town. It is certain they have taken a packet coming to me, but where from I cannot learn. I have represented my situation so fully in several former Letters, and as our difficulties rather increase...