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I laid your’s and Mr Richardson’s letter before the Council of our incipient University at their monthly meeting, and now return that of Mr R. We have not yet obtained a Charter and cannot expect any pecuniary assistance either from the State or City. We have in that respect great difficulties to encounter and probably still greater from the Sectarian influence, whether that which supports or...
I have just received your letter of 14th inst. When Mr King left England, he transferred to my credit the unexpended balance of the £2000 which had been remitted on account of the University of Virginia. I made sundry payments and in like manner, on my leaving London, I transferred the unexpended balance, amounting to about £300 as far as I can recollect, to the credit of the Secretary of...
Your letters of March 20th & April 9th have been duly received, and although my enquiries are not terminated, I will no longer delay the answer, which it may be desirable for you to receive before the 20th of July. I have extended the enquiry to every accessible quarter; Mr Lawrence the Secy. of the Legation has also been actively employed, and the concourse of candidates for Professorships in...
I arrived here with my family on the 24 th instant after a prosperous voyage of 34 days from Havre: but I could not open my baggage till yesterday. By this day’s mail I send five packets directed to you, and another will accompany this letter. Of the state of your health I have not lately heard, but hope that you have recovered & do not sensibly feel the effects of your accident. I am well...
I inclose a copy of M r Gallatin’s letter temporably appointing M r Dady Consul at Marseille, American Legation M r Joshua Dodge is hereby authorized to act temporaly as Consul of the United States of America for the Port & Consulate of Marseilles and to continue to perform the functions of the Said Office untill the will of the President of the United States as to the Said appointment shall...
On my return from Geneva, I found your friendly letter of March last. Most sincerely do I congratulate you on the happy & honorable termination of your political labours. Few indeed have the good fortune, after such career as yours, to carry in their retirement, the entire approbation of their fellow citizens with that of their own conscience. Never was a country left in a more flourishing...
I enclose a letter from Professor Pictet which he gave me during a last excursion to Geneva . I saw there your nephew Terrel with whom every one is well pleased and who appears to be desirous of improving himself in every respect. He is not at all dissipated, and if his expences somewhat exceed his calculations, it is because he has fixed himself in the house of one of the most respectable...
Amongst the offers of persons wishing to go to the United States & to enter their service, one only has appeared to me worthy of attention & to deserve to be submitted to the decision of Government. Mr. LeSueur, whose letter explaining his views is enclosed, is a civil Engineer of reputation, who has executed with much correctness various extensive trigonometrical operations, & whose Services...
The month I have already spent in Paris has been necessarily devoted in a great degree to my private arrangements; and I am only within two days settled in my house. Various considerations induce me to think that it will be proper to open soon the discussion of the subject of indemnities with this Government; & I believe that they expect it. In making my compliment to the King, I took care,...
I have this moment received your’s of 3d. instt., an answer to which has been anticipated by my two last letters. I am urging the Captain of the Peacock, and still hope that he will be ready to sail the day after to morrow. I almost envy you the happy time which you will spend this summer in Orange, and which will not, I hope, be disturbed by any untoward change in our affairs. I think that,...
I have received your’s of 16 th ult o , and, from Dufief , the work of M r Tracy , for La Fayette . I had become acquainted with M
I omitted, in my last letter, an answer to your queries on the subject of the remittance to Baring for Todd’s expences. The exchange is now at specie par, both bills on London and specie being about nine per cent above New York bank paper. There is no prospect of either the exchange or the English Bank paper falling lower down. I have not known the true rate of exchange, after making allowance...
I duly received your letter & will of course see La Fayette and procure the busts. The Peacock will, it is said, be ready on Wednesday, and we expect to sail on that day. I do not contemplate a long residence in France and hope that I may soon be permitted to return to America which I leave with a heavy heart. In the expectation of having again the pleasure in a short time of seeing you, and...
Last Washington mail brought me the enclosed letter (returned) from Gen. John Smith of New York. Mr. Astor has never spoken to me on the subject. It would please me that he should be gratified in that respect. It will promote the filling of subscriptions, and he has a fair claim to that honorific distinction. In April 1813, when the federalists of New York refused to subscribe to the 16...
Your letter of the 12th. reached me only the day before yesterday, and not willing to make a hasty decision, I have delayed an answer till to day. I feel very grateful for your kind offer, which I know to have been equally owing to your friendship for me and to your views of public utility. I decline it with some reluctance because I think that I would be more useful at home than abroad and I...
I have much regretted that a detention in my journey to this place prevented my arriving at Baltimore till after your nephew ’s departure . I had brought with me letters for Geneva which I have sent after him. M r Erving takes duplicates, and I will send triplicates on my arrival at Paris ; so that I hope that he will experience no disappointment on that account. I found the institutions and...
Mr. Gelston, having determined to go to Washington on the subject of the damages recovered against him in the case of the "American Eagle", has requested me to write to you in his behalf and to state the distressing situation in which he is placed. Having written to the Secretary of the Treasury, permit me to refer you to that letter. I do not perceive how he can, unless relieved by...
On my return from Washington , I found your welcome letter of Oct er 16 th which my friends here, daily expecting my return, had kept instead of forwarding it. Our opinions opinion of Bonaparte is precisely the same. In that, La Fayette ’s and every friend’s of rational liberty in France did coincide. The return of that man was generally considered by them as a curse. Notwithstanding the...
I have ultimately decided not to go to France, and write this day accordingly to the Secretary of State. I am fully sensible of the efforts you made to keep me in the Treasury, of the unpleasant situation in which my absence & that effort placed you, as well as of the friendly motives which, combined with your view of public utiltty, induced you to give me this last proof of your high regard...
I enclose two letters from Europe, one from La Fayette , who desired that I should bear witness to his constant endeavours, under all circumstances, in support of the cause of liberty, and to his undiminished affection for his American friends & particularly for yourself. I was much gratified by the receipt of your kind letter of March last brought by M r Ticknor . Your usual partiality to me...
I have sent by Mr Cutts the convention for regulating the commercial intercourse with Great Britain, & will write on that subject to the Secretary of State. I will only say that the British Government appeared rather desirous to have made no arrangement & to have kept the whole intercourse to be controuled by their own municipal regulations, which they thought we could not counteract. The...
Govr. Tompkins, at the request of the general Govt., called into service detachments of militia to assist in carrying the embargo into effect along the lakes. He also organised at the request of Gen. Dearborne & Wilkinson the regulars on the same service. In fact he alone did all that was done on that occasion & even advanced money. I understand that his accounts are suspended because he...
In a conversation with Gen. Armstrong, he appeared disposed to make an excursion towards the scene of action on our northern frontier. I have perhaps more confidence in Gen. Dearborn than almost any other person, and for many reasons have no wish to see Gen. Armstrong unite the character of General to that of Secretary. Yet, from my knowledge of both, I think that the success of the campaign...
I have the honour to enclose the copy of a letter written this day to the Secretaries for the War and Navy department, which gives a general view of our fiscal situation for this year, and regulates the sums which in conformity therewith may be monthly drawn during the residue of the year 1813, for the service of each of those departments respectively. I have the honour to be with the highest...
Whereas his Imperial Majesty the Emperor of all the Russias, as the common friend of the United States and Great Britain, has offered them his mediation, with a view to the restoration of Peace and the establishment of permanent harmony between them; and the invitation having been accepted on the part of the United States in contemplation of a like acceptance on the part of Great Britain: Now...
We have hardly money enough to last till the end of the month. The loan is opened for 12th & 13th inst. The result will be known here (Boston & Charleston excepted) on Tuesday or Wednesday 17th inst. If therefore there be any arrangements discretionary with the President, such as the organization of the 20 regiments of 12 months men, building ships &c, and which are susceptible of extension or...
You will perceive by the enclosed letters from Collector Dearborn, that the information given by E. Mix has enabled him to seize two vessels bound to Halifax with provisions and to arrest several of the merchants concerned. E. Mix has arrived here & was in fact obliged to leave Boston. He states that he has not one cent & by the enclosed letter asks for some compensation. As his information...
It is necessary to open immediately the loan as we have not money enough to last us more than one month. I enclose for your signature the usual authority. The terms which it is intended to offer are to give for every 100 dollars loaned, six per cent stock to that amount & in addition thereto an annuity of one dollar a year for thirteen years. That annuity is equivalent to a premium of about 8½...
I enclose the recommendations &a. for sundry offices either vacant or where removals should take place. The pressure of more important business had prevented an earlier attention to those minor subjects, all of which have been delayed too long & most of which are earnestly urged by the respective members of the vicinities. The designations of offices and names of candidates are as followeth....
22 January 1813, Treasury Department. Submits statements in conformity with the resolution of the Senate dated 20 Jan. “For all the Treasury notes which have been disposed of, credit has been given, by the respective Banks, to the Treasurer of the United States, on the days from which such notes, respectively, were dated & commenced to bear interest.” RC and enclosures ( DNA : RG 46,...
Since, from this morning’s conversation, it appears that the choice of a Secy. of War must fall on Govr. Tompkins or on Gen. Armstrong, permit me to state the reasons which, after fixing my thoughts on those two gentlemen alone, incline me in favour of the last. Personally acquaintted with both, I feel no hesitation in saying that as respects talents & military knowledge, Gen. Armstrong is...
7 January 1813. “I enclose the usual account of the contingent expences of Govt.—which is sent by yourself to each house of Congress. The triplicate remains with you.” RC and enclosure ( DLC ); enclosure, two copies ( DNA : RG 233, President’s Messages, 12A-D1; DNA : RG 46, President’s Messages, 12A-E2). RC 1 p.; docketed by JM. For enclosure, see n. 1. JM transmitted the message in a letter...
I do not believe that the appointmt. of Govr. Tompkins would be either eligible or calculated to inspire confidence. No person thinks him equal to the place at such time as this. The office requires first abilities & frightens those who know best its difficulties. Dearborn & Mr Monroe have shrunk from it, & so will, I suspect, Crawford. Respectfy. Yours RC ( DLC : Rives Collection, Madison...
There is not now any vacant office of Receiver of public monies in the Mississippi territory . There was a vacancy last spring which was filled before the end of the last session of Congress. The series of misfortunes experienced this year in our military land operations exceeds all anticipations made even by those who had least confidence in our inexperienced officers and undisciplined men. I...
In support of the suggestions heretofore made against permitting Gen. Armstrong to raise a volunteer force on different principles from those recognized by law and adopted elsewhere, I enclose 3 advertisements from the late New York papers. Whilst such improper encouragement is given for a local force, it will be impossible to recruit for the army or for general purposes; and the general...
The enclosed letter asserts positively that Hutchinson is warmly attached to the present administration. That from his connections & residence at Lisbon, he will be the most respectable & best appointment, I really believe. On those grounds, permit me once more to renew my application in his behalf. Cathcart is already placed, & will certainly give much less satisfaction to the commercial part...
Memoranda Mr Armstrong’s letter 1. Preference to be given to contracts for supplying the army with provisions. This is so indubitable that how any hesitation on the subject could take place is not easily understood. That branch of military expenditure is the only one (pay excepted) which is well administered & under a good accountability. If it was practicable to extend the same system (of...
Is it proper to enlist volunteers, under the existing act, for local & special services? Is not this a distinct organisation such as was contemplated when thinking of a local force? And would it not be better to have a general law for that object, reserving the volunteers for more active service? If Gen. A. is not controlled, he will draw for the defence of New York a much larger permanent...
I send the two paragraphs. I believe the whole to be sufficiently distinct, with the exception perhaps of the last sentence of the first paragraph. If the forfeitures are not remitted at all, there will be considerable injustice, great discontent, & 8 to 10 millions of dollars put in the pocket of the collectors. If they are altogether remitted, the importers will make unreasonable profits, &...
The exchange of places which you suggested would, in my opinion, have a most salutary effect on the conduct of the war: but, on mature reflection, I apprehend that it would not satisfy public opinion and would be more liable to criticism than almost any other course that could be adopted. Respectfully Your’s RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM. The details of this proposed change have not been found,...
Cleveland being at the mouth of Cayuga, the Huron river at the mouth of which the Ohio militia have been landed, is certainly that which empties into Lake Erie between the rivers Cayuga & Sandusky. The letter being dated 27th instt., Huntingdon cannot be expected within less than a week. In the mean while I am most decidedly of opinion that no information he may bring, can or ought to alter...
Is not the within important? And Might not the Navy dept. give immediate authority to Capt. Chauncey? RC and enclosure ( NHi : Gallatin Papers). RC undated; date assigned here on the basis of JM’s reply of the same day. For enclosure, see n. 1. The enclosure was a 24 Aug. 1812 letter written from New York by John Armstrong to Gallatin (2 pp.). Armstrong relayed the substance of a conversation...
I was detained by indisposition & bad weather longer than I expected. I have found here your letter of 15th inst., and wish that you may not leave Washington as early as you had contemplated. I go there at this time only to meet with you, & will not reach it before Saturday. It is important that I should know your decision on the subject of the large British importations: I have some not...
I received yours, of 7th only by yesterday’s mail. What I can do at this time here with respect to money is nearly completed. But I had intended before my return to Washington, to go to Albany in order to see Gen. Dearborn & Govr. Tompkins together and to be able to give you a better account of the situation & prospect of our affairs there. It is also necessary that I should spend one week...
It is said that the Consulship of Lisbon is vacant. If so, permit me to recommend with more than common earnestness Pemberton Hutchinson the son of my former friend Doctr. Hutchinson. The name is dear to every republican in this State both in city & country. And I am assured that the son by his talents & standing deserves the appointment. In one respect he has an advantage, that of being...
The monies approprd. by 1st. Sect. of Act herein mentioned, not being stated to be for the use of the navy cannot by the Secy. of the Treasury be ordered for that purpose. It must on the contrary be observed that the words used are the same wh. have in former laws been exclusively applied to fortifications & been accordingly placed under the controul of the Secy. of War. RC ( DLC ). Docketed...
1. Organise regularly the encampment at Albany by marching there all the recruits, those intended for Niagara excepted 2. Invite offers of volunteers every where, but not giving orders to march (those intended for Niagara excepted) until the number in most places be ascertained, and it be known whether the changes in England will produce immediate peace The inviting offers as aforesaid through...
I believe the weekly arrivals from foreign ports will for the ensuing four weeks average from one to one and a half million dollars a week. To protect these & our coasting vessels whilst the British have still an inferior force on our coast appears to me of primary importance. I think that orders to that effect ordering them to cruize accordingly ought to have been sent yesterday, & that at...
The enclosed memorandum contains the substance of all the information I possess respecting the lands in Tenessee, which is connected with the late proceedings on the part of North Carolina. Respectfully Your obedt. Servt. Memorandum—Lands in Tenessee By act of cession of N. Carolina to U. States of year 1790; reservation is made of land sufficient to satisfy military land bounties, & all...
Understanding that the law authorising a loan has passed, I beg leave to submit the propriety of requesting the Secretaries of the War and Navy departments to prepare estimates of the probable monthly expenditures of each of the said departments to the end of the present year. The extent of the loan, the time of opening it, and the dates at which its several instalments should be made payable,...