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Results 4711-4724 of 4,724 sorted by recipient
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Draft: American Philosophical Society On Sept. 21, 1764, Franklin and Foxcroft recommended that the proposed new postal act change the schedule of rates between colonial offices from one based chiefly on a few specified places to one stated in general terms of mileage alone, thereby eliminating several inconsistencies resulting from the earlier method. The postmasters general adopted this...
4712Poor Richard Improved, 1765 (Franklin Papers)
Poor Richard improved: Being an Almanack and Ephemeris … for the Year of our Lord 1765 : … By Richard Saunders, Philom. Philadelphia: Printed and Sold by B. Franklin, and D. Hall. (Yale University Library) During Franklin’s first mission to England, 1757–62, he left the preparation of the annual issues of the Poor Richard almanacs to his partner, David Hall. When he returned to Philadelphia,...
4713Editorial Introduction (Franklin Papers)
These letters illustrate the complexities—perhaps increased by the writer’s nature—of trying to negotiate a transatlantic sale of land. Daniel Roberdeau wanted to dispose of his plantation in the Antilles; he believed that he had one potential buyer in London, and hoped that he might find several who would vie with each other. To save himself a journey to England he sent a power of attorney to...
D : American Philosophical Society Mr. Me. et Mlle. Defouchy sont venus pour avoir l’honneur de voir Monsieur franklin. Comte de Mac Donald Colonel. P. Hancock, from England au Caffe anglais Rue st. honore du sergent. Hemery fondeur en carataire d’ainprimery Rue st. jaque che Mr. Canon Cordonier visavi le notaire. See the preceding document. Jean-Paul Grandjean de Fouchy, an astronomer, had...
Printed in The Public Advertiser , May 21, 1774. Permit me, thro’ the Channel of your Paper, to convey to the Premier, by him to be laid before his Mercenaries, our Constituents, my own Opinion, and that of many of my Brethren, Freeholders of this imperial Kingdom of the most feasible Method of humbling our rebellious Vassals of North America. As we have declared by our Representatives that we...
4716Passport for Cartel Ships, [1782] (Franklin Papers)
Passy, printed by Benjamin Franklin, 1782. Printed form and AD (draft): American Philosophical Society Whereas an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain has been lately passed for the Exchange of American Prisoners; and in pursuance thereof, sundry Vessels are by that Government engaged as Transports to convey to America those Prisoners of War who have been confined in the Goals of England and...
Printed by Benjamin Franklin, Passy, 1779. Printed form with MS insertions in blanks: Archives Départementales du Morbihan By the time Franklin received Francis Coffyn’s letter of September 18, below, enclosing a copy of the French government’s regulations concerning American prizes, he had already seen those regulations and had finally understood that he bore responsibility for judging the...
Printed in The London Chronicle , Dec. 23–25, 1773 By the late summer of 1773 the furor aroused by the Hutchinson letters had spread from Boston to London. Franklin’s role in the affair was still unknown; attention focused on who had obtained the correspondence from Thomas Whately’s papers, and a long controversy on this point began in the pages of the Public Advertiser . On September 4 an...
AD (draft): American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress This document, as Franklin explains in his note at the end, is not what it appears to be. It was a protest from him and not, despite its opening sentence, from the convention. If he ever submitted it to that body, the meager minutes say nothing about it; and it was certainly not submitted to Congress. He wrote it at some...
That the Subjects of his Britannic Majesty and the People of the Said United States Shall continue to enjoy, unmolested, the Right to take Fish of every Kind, on the Grand Bank and on all the other Banks of Newfoundland: also in the Gulph of St Laurence, and in all other Places, where the Inhabitants of both Countries, used at any time heretofore to fish; and the Citizens of the Said United...
Printed in The Boston Gazette , November 27, 1775. The King’s own REGULARS; And their Triumphs over the Irregulars . A New SONG , To the Tune of, An old Courtier of the Queen’s, and the Queen’s old Courtier. The song was also published in the Pa. Evening Post , March 30, 1776, and the Constitutional Gaz. , April 6, 1776; we have supplied readings of some illegible words from the former....
4722Memorandum Book, 1757–1776 (Franklin Papers)
MS account book: American Philosophical Society [April 3, 1757] Before leaving for England Franklin provided his wife with a long, narrow account book in which she was to record her expenditures during his absence. She made the first entry on April 3, even before he had gone. But later, like many wives—and husbands too—she was far from meticulous in recording everything she spent. There are...
AD : University of Pennsylvania Library These jottings are beyond question an early step in formulating the dispatch below, November 30, to the committee for foreign affairs. They afford the first insight we have had into Franklin’s approach to the drafting of such a document, and also into his determination to dabble in French even when preparing notes in English. The list can be assigned...
4724On Sinecures, 28 September 1768 (Franklin Papers)
Printed in The Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser , September 28, 1768 To the Printer of the Gazetteer and New Daily Advertiser . Great complaints are every day made, that notwithstanding Great Britain has involved herself in a very heavy debt, for the defence of the American colonies in the late war, that now they refuse to pay any part of this debt. On this subject there has been a very...