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  • Author

    • Franklin, Benjamin
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    • Williams, Jonathan, Jr.
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Franklin, Benjamin" AND Recipient="Williams, Jonathan, Jr." AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Copy: Library of Congress I am glad you have settled your affairs to your Mind relating to the Fayette. I hope She will now soon be at L’Orient. M. le Marquis de Castries, desired to know of me if your Request of a Passport for the Arms was agreable to my Views. I answered yes, & that he would oblige me by granting it. I suppose you will receive it by this Post. I wish You to send, either by...
Copy: Library of Congress Enclosed is a Letter from M. Lavosier, one of the Fermers General, by which you will see that the necessary papers for the Saltpetre are dispatched. I want much the Invoice you promised me of the Cloths bought of M. De Chaumont, and to know precisely the Terms of that Purchase & the Amount. M. Austin tells me he will leave some Money in your Hands for me, in 270...
Two copies: Library of Congress I mentioned the other Day the Affair of your Man to M de Renneval at M de Vergennes’s who informed me that I should apply to M. de Castries. I did not meet with him, & Billy goes out to day expressly to obtain his Order for the Release of the poor Fellow, which M. de Renneval assur’d me would meet with no Difficulty. I hope you will receive it with this, as he...
Copies: Connecticut Historical Society, University of Virginia Library Yours by Capt. Nicholson are before us. Mr. Deanes Lettres of yesterday proposed passing a Sale of the Lyon and sending her out as french Property, that is that she go down the River as commanded by the french Captain, and that Captain Nicholson instead returning to Nantes go directly to meet her at the mouth of the River...
ALS (draft): American Philosophical Society; copy: Library of Congress I have acquainted Mr Chaumont that I approved of his accepting the Bills, and that I would provide for the Payment. I observe they are drawn at 2, 3, & 4 Usances.— As to the Cloathing. If the Congress had only demanded so many Suits, without giving particular Directions, we might have taken our Friends Opinions, and let...
Copy: Library of Congress I received your three Letters of the 22 Inst and one of the 24th. As to the Report you mention be assured I never gave any “ orders to M. scheweighauser to advance no Money to any Prisoners .” On the Contrary, when the former Cartel arriv’d, I directed him to supply them with such Necessaries as Mr. Adams who was present should advise. And when he wrote me word that...
Jr. Copy: Library of Congress I have received yours of the 19th. Inst. with the Account of the Duties you have paid. I do not comprehend the Policy of burthening their own Manufactures; but the Laws of the Country we trade with must be observed. I have determin’d to rely on the Government entirely for the Transport of the Goods. I am instructed not to send them but under Convoy directly to...
ALS : Frederick R. Kirkland, Philadelphia (1955) I have now receiv’d the Bill from Mr. Chaumont accepted. The Acceptance is in these Words Accepté pour payer des fonds qui me seront remis a cet effet, Le Ray de Chaumont . He tells me that you may act upon this in relieving Capt. Babson and his People to the Amount including what they have already had from you. There seems however some Caution...
ALS (draft): Library of Congress The Prize of Capt. Wickes, which we ordered into your Hands, we desire you will deliver up to the Disposal of Mr. Lee; and are Your humble Servants Notation: Letter to Mr Williams This is also in BF ’s hand and was clearly intended to accompany the preceding letter; like it, we assume, it was not sent.
Copy: Library of Congress I have received yours of the 26th. I am promised an Answer from Mr. Paulze this Morning and If I receive it shall send it to you by tomourrow’s Post. This Soliciting of Interested People to forgive Duties they think their Right, is an odious Task to me. I had rather at any time, If I could afford it, pay ’em myself. Mr. Chaumont thinks Mr. Bondfield’s Propositions too...